The Wheel of the Year forever turning…

wheelyearblackberriesAutumn has most definitely arrived and we’ve had some gorgeous misty mornings and dramatic sunsets. I’m not sure if it is my imagination but there seem to be huge quantities of blackberries in the hedgerows this year and the rowan trees are thick with their red berries… I do hope this isn’t a sign of a cold winter to come! I came across an article in a magazine that was talking about it being ‘Mabon’, which I had heard of but didn’t know much about, so I did some Googling…

Mabon is the Autumn Equinox, or Harvest, on Sept 21nd/22nd in the ‘Wheel of the Year’ as followed by practicing Pagans. All very ancient and traditional, I thought… but it seems not! The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans.  It consists of either four or eight festivals: either the solstices and equinoxes, known as the ‘quarter days’, or the four midpoints between, known as the ‘cross quarter days’. and tThe term ‘Mabon’ was only introduced in the 1970s.

While many historical Pagan traditions celebrated the various equinoxes, solstices, and the days approximately midway, celebrating all eight festivals is a new departure and, you could say, a jolly good excuse for more partying!

Joking aside, I love the idea of celebrating the changes in the seasons, the fruits of nature and the changes in the weather. Mabon, which is basically Harvest Festival, is the Pagan ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth and recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months.

The Festivals of the Wheel Of The Year represent the active and dormant states of nature, man and agriculture. Each of the festival days was ruled by a governing deity, with each region having its own associated deity. From planting to reaping to winter to summer… the seasons were of great importance to our ancestors, for their very existence depended upon good harvests, mild winters and enough rainfall.

So, as it is Mabon, here’s a lovely recipe using quince which, apart from having a beautiful name, is a magical autumn fruit. When stewed for a long time, it turns aromatic and gloriously pink. Its syrup makes an excellent base for a warming autumn cider punch.

Quince, apple & cider punch

Serves 6

  • 250ml apple juice
  • 225g soft brown sugar
  • 1 quince, peeled, quartered and cored
  • 1 vanilla pod, halved
  • 1 apple, cored and sliced
  • 500ml cider
  1. Put the apple juice in a pan with 250ml of water. Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Add the quince and the halved vanilla pod.
  3. Simmer for at least 30 minutes, or up to an hour if you want a stronger colour.
  4. Add in the apple slices and cook for a couple of minutes, then add the cider and remove from the heat.
  5. Serve immediately, making sure there are some slices of apple or quince in each glass.
3 Comments
3 replies
  1. Tracy W says:

    A great post. I’m a modern Pagan and celebrate all the festivals and to extent it is a good excuse to party, well for me it’s a good excuse for some me time with extra treats! Creative Blessings, Tracy x

    Reply
  2. Bonnie Weakley says:

    We too in Oregon share in beautiful Autums. The colors are just glorious . Don’t you just love the change of seasons? I truely believe that there is nothing more beautiful than an Oregon Blue Sky Day. You and your family are more than welcome to visit me and discover for yourself. Don’t come in the wiinter or spring because we are well known for our rainy weather. Love everthing about you Joanna. Bonnie usa

    Reply

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