Salt of the earth

There’s been a lot of publicity over the past few years about cutting down salt intake as it is ‘bad for you’, especially with regard to blood pressure… but let’s not get too panicky about it. Salt is actually absolutely vital for our bodies to function.

Salt – whether it’s the stuff they spread on the road in winter, common table salt or an exotic pink one from the Himalayas – has the same chemical composition, an equal amount of sodium and chloride. Salt is essential for life and, as the body can’t produce it itself, we have to add it to our diet in some way. Without it, our bodies become chemically unbalanced, our muscles and nervous system cease to function and eventually we will die.

If you think about it, all our body fluids are salty – blood, sweat, tears and saliva. The general consensus among experts is that a healthy adult should aim towards a daily intake of five or six grams of salt to maintain a good balance. It seems the biggest problem with controlling our salt intake is through eating convenience foods as these often contain astonishing amounts of salt – and that’s in both savoury and sweet dishes! If you prepare most of your meals fresh and from scratch, you can govern how much salt you do, or don’t, add and your intake is probably absolutely fine.

Salt is all around us. Underground and on the earth’s surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. Some salt has even arrived from outer space in meteors. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, seawater offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply that, if extracted, would cover the world’s total land mass to a depth of 35 metres.

Apart from its essential health benefits, salt is also a fantastic flavour enhancer. It is one of the key five tastes that we experience on our tongues, the others being sweet, sour, bitter and umami. It can reduce bitterness and enhance sweetness – salt just makes things taste better!

And what an amazingly useful thing it is too. Think how we use it as a preservative (and have done for thousands of years), it improves texture and colour and is an abrasive too. It’s soothing – we take salt baths and my Mother used to make me gargle with it as a child if I had a sore throat and if you spill any, do remember to chuck a pinch over your left shoulder and it will ward off evil spirits too!

Salty facts:

  • Roman soldiers were sometimes paid in salt – which is where the word ‘salary’ comes from
  • Every cell in the body contains salt – an adult contains about 250g
  • Salt is used to remove traces of water from aviation fuel after it is purified
  • Salt was used to preserve Egyptian mummies
  • Salt removes red wine stains.
4 Comments
4 replies
  1. Sallyann Davis says:

    Did you know you can buy beautiful salt lamps ? It is believed they put good irons or something into the air..the salt is heated by using a light bulb. I was looking at them n my local crystal shop. Xx

    Reply
  2. PJ Thompson says:

    Joanna… Enjoyed your “Salt Talk”… I’m a Salty myself…I have over 3000 Open Salt Cellars in my collection… Did you know that there is actually SPILT SALT on the TABLE of THE LAST SUPPER that Leonardo da Vinci painted??? Yep.. Right there in front of Judas.. (Facing the painting-to the Left of Jesus) He had knocked over the salt cellar… BAD LUCK… Hummmm…..

    Reply
  3. Jan Allen says:

    I remember flying to Faro Airport in the Algarve one year and to my amazement, flew over what appeared a luna landscape….no, it was the salt flats, absolutely fascinating to see, like huge ripples of white waves, a wonderful sight! Very interesting article Joanna, thank you.
    Jan Allen, Dorset.

    Reply

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