A fan of fans!

I have been a fan of fans, so to speak, for ages and I was thrilled when Practical Publishing chose fans as the theme of my latest boxed set with them. The set (and it’s fantastic value) will be available on the website for pre-orders on Thursday 10th May and then on my upcoming Create and Craft shows on the 17th and 18th May. But back to being a fan of fans…

While there are endless possibilities for crafting, fans were, and still are, extremely useful devices for cooling yourself down on a hot day. Both highly decorative and practical, I think the loss of the fan as an everyday accessory is a great shame as it makes a great prop. You can fiddle with it (in lieu of cigarettes!), flirt coyly from behind it and use it to make a point by snapping it shut or perhaps even prodding someone with it!

Archaeological ruins show that the hand fan was used in ancient Greece at least since the 4th century. Christian Europe’s earliest fan dates from the 6th century. This was used during services to drive insects away from the consecrated bread and wine. Hand fans were absent in Europe during the High Middle Ages until they were reintroduced in the 13th and 14th centuries. Fans from the Middle East were brought back by Crusaders while Portuguese traders brought them back from China and Japan in the 16th century, and fans became popular. Fans are well displayed in the portraits of the high-born women of the era. Queen Elizabeth I of England can be seen to carry both folding fans decorated with pom poms on their guardsticks as well as the older style rigid fan, usually decorated with feathers and jewels.

In the 18th century, fans reached a high degree of artistry and were being made throughout Europe often by specialised craftsmen. Folded fans of silk or parchment were decorated and painted by artists.

It has been said that in the courts of England, Spain and elsewhere fans were used in a more or less secret, unspoken code of messages and that these ‘fan languages’ were a way to cope with the restricting social etiquette… However, modern research has proved that this was a marketing ploy developed in the 18th century by a fan manufacturer! I am going to pretend I didn’t discover this fact on Google as I think the language of the fan sounds wonderful and should be reintroduced!

I always associate fans with Jane Austen’s novels and there are lots of fun and interesting fan references on the Jane Austen’s World website.

The website contains the following ‘quote’ supporting the language of fans story, which I am going to repeat here as I’d really like to be able to snap my fan shut to end an argument!

“In the eighteenth century, wealthy Georgian ladies, especially English ones, waved fans at masquerade balls and wore them as a fashion accessory with almost every outfit that they owned. There were daytime fans, white satin bridal fans and even mourning fans. As well as drawing attention to beautiful and perfectly manicured hands, these items played a big part in delicate flirtations. In fact, a whole ‘language of the fan’ had developed in England in Tudor times that became especially popular for middle and upper-class Victorian women who were courting. A folded fan placed against a lady’s chin told a gentleman that she found him attractive, for example, while snapping a fan shut was a curt dismissal! No wonder that the 16th century English writer, Joseph Addison, stated: “Men have the sword, women have the fan and the fan is probably as effective a weapon!”

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