A window of opportunity

The other day (over yet more book signing – yippee!!) I was discussing houses and décor with my partner in crime writing, Julia. She has recently moved house and is blessed with wonderful views of Dartmoor. Not wanting to obscure the views behind blinds or net curtains, she was telling me about the ‘window art’ she has discovered… hmm, interesting I thought, tell me more!

After living in a very old and dark farmhouse for the past 20 years, Julia wants to ensure she gets lots of light (and the gorgeous views) in her new house. She has opted for clear glass in her front and back doors, as well as patio doors and even her bathroom window! But to ensure privacy and to deter people, dogs and birds from colliding with the glass she has bought several designs of decorative window stickers.

I guess we’ve all seen the bird silhouettes you can stick on your patio doors to try and stop bird strikes, but if you look online there are a huge range of really lovely designs that transform glass to look as if it is etched.

All these images are from Metal Monkey, they have a huge range!

You can either buy frosted and decorative window film where there is a pattern or image cut out of the frosting (offers the most privacy), or you can go for the reverse, where you add a frosted design onto plain glass. While rummaging around on the internet, Julia came across some wonderful designs from Metal Monkey, the most expensive about £18 while the majority were under £10. It’s a very reasonable way to add a lovely design touch to what used to be a rather ‘utilitarian’ look and often involved buying whole new panes of glass and the expense of having them fitted.

Photo: Brume.

Julia has opted for modern designs to reflect the style of her house, but also kept them very ‘natural’ to compliment her lovely countryside surroundings. She has bees and birds for her patio doors, mostly to stop her dog Moss from squashing her nose on the glass when she forgets they are closed, and some lovely allium-inspired designs for her main doors. Oh, and some lovely Japanese leaping carp for her bathroom window! Can’t wait to see the finished results!

Jewel-like stained glass film from Brume. Photo: Brume.

One of the suppliers Julia came across is called Brume, and they are actually based just down the road from me here in Devon! They have some lovely contemporary designs as well as more traditional ones. As well as the frosted stickies, they also make the most gorgeous stained glass colours. Their coloured transparent window film can give you the sophisticated look of traditional stained glass without the costs and installation problems. And of course, if you decide to have a re-design, you can easily remove your stained glass window sticker and replace it with a different colour that reflects your home’s new look.

I must say I do fancy having a bit of a play with the stained glass idea… Have any of you already tried something Like this, I’d be interested to hear how you got on!

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Have a Holly Pond Hill Christmas!

I wanted to share a couple of Holly Pond Hill Christmas cards with you today – hmm not that many weeks to Christmas, have you made all your cards yet?

Of course the first thing you are going to do is say “Have you?” and of course the answer you knew was coming is… nope nothing like all of them yet!

One year I promise I will be a super organised Christmas person, I will plan in advance not only what we are eating, who is coming and when, but also make my cards months in advance. I’m not succeeding very well on that list this year. Currently I have no clue if my girls are with me on Christmas Day or whether as we have done in the past we postpone the big day to December 26th.

It’s so much harder when children are grown up, they acquire other families (their in-laws) that have just as much right to Christmas Day as you do and, shock horror, they even occasionally want to go away for Christmas! I do wonder what the reaction would be if Richard and I went away for Christmas, not sure they would think that was right! No stockings, no-one to cook and clear away on Christmas Day – noooo!

But back to the cards – Christmas in Holly Pond Hill is a fabulous CD. If you haven’t got it already, then it’s definitely on my top 5 list for making Christmas cards and I can recommend it. I love the little characters and there are also some amazing images without furry bits too!

Both the cards use the matching backing papers that come with the toppers on the CD (easy to find!) and the little parcel on the right uses the (SD553) Small Box Envelope die and again a paper from the CD.

Maybe aim to have half your Christmas cards done by the middle of November Joanna? Hmm … maybe!

 

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Patchwork Fish!

This is a fun shaker card that has bubbles or snow inside the fishbowl! Shaker cards are simple to make once you have made your first one (I always found them really intimidating) and the swish of the ‘bubbles’ adds another dimension to the card.

The background patchwork paper is from the Joanna Sheen Paper Collections Pad (Volume 3) – there’s a blue version of this pink patchwork too – so pretty. The size of the card is 8” x 8”  – yes I use this card size a lot and love our own brand cards that size as they really are 8” x 8”, whereas most manufactured cards measure the envelope or have slight tolerances with size etc..

The shaker part is created like this:

  1. Take a piece of white card about 4” square and put to one side for now. Cut a piece slightly larger say 4 ¼” square. Stamp or die cut a fish bowl (Sue Wilson does one on the website CED21001) on the larger piece and attach to the centre of the card. Now cut away the centre of the fish bowl. Cover the back of the fish bowl with some acetate.
  2. Die cut some tropical fish (Signature dies Tropical Fish) in white card and colour as you please. Glue these onto the smaller piece of card, checking that you are happy with their placement by hovering the fishbowl over the top.
  3. Place a strip of foam tape all the way around the smaller piece of card – and I mean all the way around. Cracks between the corners can spell disaster. One way to combat this is to place a strip all round and then cover that strip with yet another but staggering where the cracks are.
  4. Now you need to cover the fish and sticky layers with your fishbowl square – do this carefully and leave a small gap once you have most of it covered – pour in your glitter or snow effect crystals or seed beads, whatever you want to use. Don’t add too much or you will just obscure the fish. Now seal down the last bit of tape.
  5. This can then be added to the card and should shake very satisfactorily!
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Good night bunny

I made this card some time ago and didn’t end up giving it away at all – do you get cards like that? I just loved it so much, I have it standing on my craft room window sill. I adore the Holly Pond Hill artwork, love cards with lace, love rabbits… OK you get the drift, I loved all the ingredients in this one!

So the main image comes from the Holly Pond Hill CD. There are so many beautiful ideas on there that can suit all ages. This rabbit saying its prayers is just delightful I think.

The first thing I wanted to solve when I made this card (before the days when I had die cut lace borders to call on!) was how to get some pretty lace behind the main image. This I have achieved by using a lace handkerchief. Take a panel of cream/white,whatever you choose, card measuring 5 1/2” x 7 1/2” now take a standard lace hanky and gather the middle together – in the end I chopped out a bit of the middle to give a less bumpy effect – and arrange it so that it goes neatly around the panel. I used lots of double sided tape, glue gel and anything else that came to hand kicking it into neat submission!

The main image is mounted onto some lilac card to give it a bit of strength and then I added that using Pinflair as the lumps and bumps are easily coped with when you use a 3D type glue!

The backing paper comes on the CD and I cut a few bunnies from the leftover strip to decoupage those – ta–da… card finished!

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A murmuration…

If you have ever been lucky enough to see a murmuration of starlings – where the birds swoop and swirl in amazing aerial ballet creating patterns in the sky – it’s not something you are likely to forget. But have you ever wondered why it is called a ‘murmuration’?

You were probably too enchanted by the magical sight to notice the ongoing background murmur – or murmuration – as caused by the beating of 10,000 pairs of wings at once. And that’s where the term comes from. Most of the collective nouns we use date back to the mid-15th century. But the origins of most collective bird and animal nouns are not always as straightforward as they first appear.

Some are named after specific habits, such as ‘a descent of woodpeckers’, possibly due to their penchant for dropping down from great heights onto ants or ‘a leap of leopards’ or ‘a busyness of ferrets’ while others focus on a personality trait that we believe them to possess.

For instance, the number of sinister sounding nouns for crows, such as murder, mob and horde, probably come from medieval peasants’ fears that the mean-looking birds had been sent by the Devil or were witches in disguise.

Similarly, ‘an unkindness of ravens’ could stem from an old misguided belief that the birds were not caring parents, sometimes expelling their young from their nests before they were ready.

Many bird species have more than one collective noun. As with crows, there are many terms to describe finches (charm, trembling and trimming) and geese, depending on whether they’re flying (skein, wedge, nide) or gathered on water (plump) or land (gaggle).

A book by Chloe Rhodes An Unkindness of Ravens: A Book of Collective Nouns is fascinating. In it she explains that, unlike proverbs, rhymes or homilies, many of these delightful names endure because they were recorded and published in ‘Books of Courtesy’ – handbooks designed to educate the nobility. So an early sort of ‘one upmanship’ to ensure you made it plain you belonged to the ‘right’ set, something like the Sloane Ranger speak of the 1980s perhaps!

Here are some of my favourite bird terms:

  • A wake of buzzards
  • A commotion of coots
  • A murder of crows
  • An asylum of cuckoos
  • A swatting of flycatchers
  • A prayer of godwits
  • A conspiracy of ravens
  • A parliament of rooks
  • An exultation of skylarks
  • A murmuration of starlings
  • A chime of wrens
  • A booby of nuthatches
  • A quilt of eiders
  • A mischief of magpies
  • A wisdom of owls
  • A committee of terns
  • A descent of woodpeckers
  • A scold of jays
  • A charm of goldfinches
  • A fall of woodcock
  • A deceit of lapwings
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