An Ocean Birthday


This was a sample made for my July TV show by Sylvie which I feel didn’t get enough airing – I just love it and the ideas used here are really worth showing you.

Start with an 8 x 8” white card blank and then layer some of the beautiful blue marble paper from our Joanna Sheen Backing Papers Volume One onto silver mirri.

Cut several pieces of the Louisa embellishment (Louisa Lace Border Signature Die). Try the 300gsm Elegance satin card on our website – it works brilliantly. Cut another piece of white card to about 5” square and colour it with distress inks. To get that wonderful bubble effect – flick tiny amounts of water at it once you have coloured it. Then draw round the splodge with a white gel pen to create bubbles.

Now cut several Ocean corner pieces (Signature Ocean Corner die) and 3 or 4 Sammy Seahorses (I chose that name – makes me smile every time!). Colour them all with Promarkers and assemble the seahorses one on top of the other and then apply a layer of crystal lacquer.

Now assemble the card. Add a layer of dark blue net/tulle between the middle panel and the back of the card and add the Louisa pieces to the back of your middle panel before you stick it down rather than trying to glue it afterwards. Add all the corners and then the seahorse and fish.

Add a final row of Louisa bits and a die cut Happy Birthday to finish the card.


Vintage Containers

CoffeeBeanSome call it clutter, hoarding or just plain rubbish. However, I love my collection of ‘useful’ pots. I save and buy quite randomly – I might see a basket in a charity shop, or a vase in a local gift shop or florist. But my squirreled away treasures also include things like Camembert boxes (come on, you can cover them or just use them as a ‘useful pot’) and, when I have seedlings in mind, even the yogurt pots are not immune to being well washed and stored away in a cupboard.

As a crafter I have worrying tendencies to clutter my life with things that will ‘come in useful’. But they bring me a lot of pleasure and when you find a brilliant use for something you had hidden away, it can feel really rewarding. If I have to defend myself I will play the eco card and talk loudly about recycling but …. the truth is I was obviously a hamster in a previous life and just like storing all sorts of goodies!

On the desk that I use for crafting I have several recycled items used for storage. I adore Jo Malone perfume and was given a set of their smellies for Christmas and the box – well, I was almost as thrilled with that as with the perfume! So that has all my ‘too small not to get lost’ in a drawer oddments. Then I have an old enamel pot that my Mum decorated with barge art when we were both going through ‘a phase’! That sorts my scissors and Japanese screw punches. I also have a pretty little handmade box that a crafter called Alice gave me one NEC that I treasure and also use for my stash of cocktail sticks.

So I understand only too well when my little toddler granddaughter holds tightly onto the box of an expensive toy and disappears off to play with that leaving whatever the present was languishing on the floor! Maybe my children can blame that on her Granny as an inherited trait!

This image caught my eye as I love the collection of vintage bits and pieces filled with flowers, I may even try and recreate something like it one day – if I do I’ll post it here on the blog!

Lily of the Valley card



  1. Start by trimming some of the paler hessian backing paper to 7 ¾”, then the darker coffee sack paper to 7 ½”. Layer these onto the card with double sided tape.
  2. Cut out the main image from the cardmaking sheet. Also cut the decoupage pieces.
  3. Attach the image to the card using tape and then build the decoupage with Pinflair glue gel.
  4. Make the embellishment of lilies of the valley by cutting the die multiple times in soft green, cream and white. Finish the bunch with a bow tied in bakers twine.

French China and hydrangeas…

CulinaryBirthdayI have said before that Hydrangeas are one of my favourites and here’s another example of how pretty they look. Fresh hydrangea popped in a teacup with another flower or two – lovely!

I follow various vintage–inspired interior design companies on Facebook and I get so much pleasure from little cameos of flowers in old china, or just old china on its own! I keep promising myself that I will redo my kitchen cupboards and arrange vintage china beautifully on every shelf… hmm maybe not, I might be too busy, nice thought, though.

It may be wonderful and contemporary to get all your household contents from IKEA, or somewhere equally minimalist but, for me, it will never have the appeal of collecting oddments from older members of the family and arranging them on shelves and window sills. I have about twenty little jugs of various sizes and I love the way they look as a collection. If I had more space I would love to collect teapots or teacups and saucers. I saw a collection the other day beautifully displayed – vintage Tupperware – hmm mine just looks beaten up and not attractive at all and is bunged in the cupboard over the freezer!

But the romantic in me inspired me to choose this artist – Stefania Ferri – she has some wonderful vintage–inspired looks which we have translated into card ingredients in the pad – I love it! Here’s how to make this card.


  • Stefania Ferri paper pad
  • Joanna Seen Paper Collection volume 3
  • Signature Dies Hydrangea and Wild Rose
  • 8” square white card blank
  • Pink, Green and burgundy cardstock
  • Assorted glue and tape


  1. Take some burgundy paper from the papers pad and layer some of the hessian look paper on top. Cut the main topper from the sheet and the small decoupage piece. Also, cut out the border strip featured on that page and the sentiment. (Brilliant that it’s all on one page I think.)
  2. Attach the hessian layered paper to the card blank, then add the decorated border. I do this with double sided tape. Now add the main topper and build the small amount of decoupage with some glue gel. Add the sentiment in the position shown.
  3. Now cut the roses and hydrangeas. Make sure you lift the rose petals to give some movement and likewise with the hydrangeas. If you wanted to you could add pearls in the centre of the roses. All of the die cuts have been fixed onto the card with glue gel.

Owls under the wisteria

OwlsWisteriaI think this card is adorable (go on Joanna, just praise your own card!) but you know what I mean, sometimes you make a card and you go ‘Ah, like that one!’

The image comes from the Marjolein Bastin’s new Autumn pad that launches on Create and Craft on the 25th July and I think they are a very cute owl family. Shame about the field mouse but hey, she has to feed her babies.

I started, as I often do with an 8 x 8” white card blank, 300gsm so it’s nice and firm. Then I chose some soft dark mauve cardstock and trimmed that slightly smaller and layered some hessian style paper from my Volume 3 backing papers.

The image itself was cut out and layered onto some purple backing paper again from Volume 3 of my backing papers and attached to the card on the bottom half.

The die is a Signature Dies Wisteria and I love, love, love it. I chose a pale lilac and a soft green – try not to go too fierce on the green as it does overshadow the flower if you have an ‘in your face’ emerald green for leaves. I die cut it several times and then arranged first the leaf sprays and glued them down using little blobs of glossy accents (applied with the ever present cocktail stick). Then, gradually add the flowers and make sure you tuck them between the leaves to cover the tops of the sprays.

For me, the card made me think of a country barn with the owl family sheltering under the eaves… just saying!


A heart-felt experience…

Today, I am handing over the blog to my partner in crime writing, Julia. She has been on a course to find out about the wonders of needle felting…

“Felt wasn’t a fabric I had really thought much about since I last made dolls’ clothes out of it as a child – it didn’t need hemming, so a great advantage. Having recently read about Sue Lewis’s lovely wet felt pictures and visited the Bellacouche studio near where I live in Moretonhampstead, I’d started to think about felt in a new light…

I booked myself on a needle felting course at the lovely sounding Cowslip Workshops on the other side of Dartmoor. Run by mixed media artist, Kate Toms, the course was entitled ‘Make a Dog in a day’, so how could I resist? As some of you may know, I am the owner of Moss the Dartmoor Dog Blogger and, like Joanna, am a confirmed dog fan. Kate creates 3D characters as well as being a published author and illustrator of books for the very young. Needle felting is currently her favourite technique.


Left to right: Kate starting to create the dog’s body using a large needle felting mat; Rovings!; These strange looking items went on to form Moss’s legs!

I, and nine other enthusiastic students, gathered at 10am for the workshop that would take us through the process of making a small felted dog. Needle felting is a wonderfully simple technique where barbed felting needles are used to interlock wool fibres forming a solid mass.

Kate is an excellent tutor, extremely knowledgeable and with a great sense of humour. She patiently took us will through the various stages to ensure we all managed to take our own little dog home with us at the end of the day.

We were faced with huge balls of wool (actually called ‘rovings’) in a mix of lovely natural colours. We made our selections and dutifully copied Kate’s demonstrations as we built up our little canine figures. And then the fun began! Stabbing yourself with a felting tool is painful… when you somehow manage to keep doing it, it is extremely painful! The air was peppered with little squeaks and cries as we all managed to stab ourselves every few minutes. (Note to self: buy a finger guard!) But never mind the pain, it was so exciting to see these amazing structures emerge out of wispy scraps of wool, that none of us showed any signs of flagging.


Left to right, adding the legs to the body; Kate patiently demonstrating; A fellow crafter having a go!

It is a fascinating technique and, once you know the basics, easy to create 3D figures. I assumed needle felting was an ancient technique, like wet felting, but apparently not. It was ‘invented’ in the 1990s. You can use a variety of tools, from a very fine single needle to create detail, to a long vicious-looking sturdy three-pronged affair that Kate calls a ‘claw’, to the smaller and very effective five-needle tool that allows you to stab away and create shapes really quickly. To minimise pain and blood loss, you work onto a foam block or a thing that looks like an enormous nail brush, the latter being a great way of carding the wool as you work.

After lunch (there’s a lovely café selling loads of delicious home-made dishes!) things got a bit more mellow as we all wallowed in a post-lunch slump. Kate, who had run the workshop the previous day, realised we were getting behind schedule and chivvied us on, saying she was happy to stay until we had all finished. We were scheduled to finish at 4pm… I finally left – ­tired, battle scared and not a little emotional – proudly clutching my little dog at 7pm!

The studios were as delightful as I’d imagined and Kate was an inspirational teacher and I can’t recommend them highly enough. A regular supply of tea, coffee, biscuits and even cake, throughout the day, ensured we didn’t run out of energy. I had a wonderful time and, as promised, everyone on the course produced a dear little dog at the end of it. They were all very different, reflecting their creator’s own personality. I, rather predictably, was trying to make a dog that looked like Moss… you can judge for yourselves whether I succeeded or not!


Left to right: Kate’s own gorgeous dogs! Everyone’s efforts – what a motley crew… and my version of Moss. She was not impressed!

If you fancy having a go at needle felting, you can find everything available online. It is a relatively cheap hobby to take up, so if it appeals to you, why not have a go? I intend to make more figures… after I’ve bought a finger guard and some sticking plasters!