Even more fans!

Just available for pre-orders is this latest boxed set from Practical Publishing. As usual, the value of all the ingredients included in the set makes it amazing value and I have loved working with all the bits and pieces.

So, what do you get? Well here is where we have added it to the website if you want to check that out, but basically it includes some really great dies that work well, gorgeous stamps (the rose one in these cards is lovely), a really useful embossing folder, a template to help you make a little cake box, lots of backing papers and toppers and of course importantly the magazine with ideas and full instructions.

It can be so frustrating when you see something in a magazine or elsewhere on the internet and you can’t work out how to make it – well this magazine has full shopping lists and how to makes for every project featured.

I hope you will enjoy using it as much as I have, the cards have all been so simple and that tissue box is amazing isn’t it? What a great use of the embossing folder – and yes all instructions clearly laid out for you to copy, I can think of a couple of friends that would like one of these.

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The hedgehog – not such a prickly character!

Well, there’s a thing! I looked out of the kitchen window the other evening and there, trotting across the drive in the dusk, was a hedgehog!

Fifty years ago, this would have been an unremarkable event as these prickly little characters were regular visitors to our gardens but, like so many of our native creatures, they have suffered a huge decline over the past few decades. Sadly, it’s the same old story – the once common hedgehog is under threat from development and the loss of its habitat with hedgerows disappearing.

In just the last 10 years, hedgehog numbers have fallen by 30%, and there are now thought to be fewer than one million left in the UK. The Wildlife Trusts say that hedgehogs are disappearing from our countryside as fast as tigers are worldwide – isn’t that sad.

There’s something terribly endearing about hedgehogs, from their funny little round bodies to their twitchy noses – and let’s face it, most of us were brought up with Mrs Tiggy-Winkle! A hedgehog washerwoman who lives in a tiny cottage in the fells of the Lake District, Mrs Tiggy-Winkle appeared in 1905 and is the creation of Beatrix Potter.

They are such comical little creatures, toddling around like little old folk that it always comes as a surprise at how fast they can move, and how long their legs are when a turn of speed is required! The one in my garden positively raced off into the flower border when the outside security light came on.

When I was a child, we would always leave out a bowl of bread and milk. Sadly, we now know that hedgehogs are lactose intolerant, so I don’t think any of us helped much, although we obviously meant well! Apparently, the best thing to give them is a dish of cat food. In the wild, hedgehogs live on a diet of invertebrates, such as snails, slugs and worms and can get through about 100 every night! Great news for gardeners, but of course you need to not use poisonous slug pellets.

Despite their beady little black eyes that appear so alert, hedgehogs have poor eyesight. They are quite curious animals and they do tend to fall into holes and get stuck, so make sure you cover up any open drains and gullies. If you have a pond, make sure you provide an access point so that hedgehogs can climb back out – this can be achieved by simply placing some stones at one end.

If you’d like to try and help and encourage hedgehogs, there’s really useful information on the Wildlife Trusts website.

Another really good website is Hedgehog Street 

 

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Grand Prix and vintage cars

It is true that these cards are not really pictures of anything remotely suitable for today’s Grand Prix races, but aren’t they lovely and vintage!

I was thinking about these images as I was watching the race from Bahrain at the weekend as Richard is a massive Formula 1 fan. We have joined some friends in a fantasy F1 competition for the past two or three years – and last year to my absolute delight, I a lone female amongst the males, actually won, and not only won our competition but placed nationally amongst F1 fans playing the game – ha ha! If you listen to Richard he would say just pure luck – I would say no, it was carefully studied form, enthusiastic attention paid to all the Sky Sports programmes we watch… well, OK, maybe it was a bit of luck… But it’s fun to join in and we like checking how we did each week!

If the person you are making a card for is a car fan, then there are several possibilities for artwork or dies that could be suitable. Whether a carefully constructed VW camper van is your style or a racing car – there’s something for everyone on the website. I love old cards as in these illustrations by Kevin Walsh. We are working on a new set of pads from Kevin that should be available later in the year – something gentle, vintage and festively Christmas themed! Watch this space…

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The origin of the willow pattern…

I know the most popular colourway relating to willow pattern… is blue, obviously. However, I think it looks good in a black silhouette too.

I have willow patterned everyday plates and blue and white pots and vases galore in my home. I love the romantic feel of the design and like the story that supposedly describes the images – I am quoting here from Wikipedia:

Once there was a wealthy Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter (Koong-se). She had fallen in love with her father’s humble accounting assistant (Chang), angering her father. (It was inappropriate for them to marry due to their difference in social class.) He dismissed the young man and built a high fence around his house to keep the lovers apart. The Mandarin was planning for his daughter to marry a powerful Duke. The Duke arrived by boat to claim his bride, bearing a box of jewels as a gift. The wedding was to take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree.

On the eve of the daughter’s wedding to the Duke, the young accountant, disguised as a servant, slipped into the palace unnoticed. As the lovers escaped with the jewels, the alarm was raised. They ran over a bridge, chased by the Mandarin, whip in hand. They eventually escaped on the Duke’s ship to the safety of a secluded island, where they lived happily for years. But one day, the Duke learned of their refuge. Hungry for revenge, he sent soldiers, who captured the lovers and put them to death. The gods, moved by their plight, transformed the lovers into a pair of doves (possibly a later addition to the tale since the birds do not appear on the earliest willow pattern plates

So when you are using a willow pattern die or stencil or stamp reflect on the sad demise of a mandarin’s daughter that had the misfortune to fall in love with an accountant … I won’t mention this to assorted members of my family that are either accountants or married to one!

These cards show off how striking the dies can look in black and they have set me wondering what it would look like as white images on black, or how about white on pale or dark blue? Love our craft!

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Howard Robinson’s Farmhouse

 

I always feel as though making a little decoupaged scene feels rather like creating a jigsaw puzzle – and I love puzzles! It may actually be that you have seen this image in a range of jigsaw puzzles as the artist Howard Robinson licenses quite a few of his creations to puzzle manufacturers around the world. It always makes me smile when I spot a puzzle from an image I recognise in a toy store.

There are twenty sheets to play with in the pack of Howard Robinson decoupage and it does feel like play. In this farmhouse picture, there’s the group of animals to arrange and it’s up to you how much detail and how many layers you choose to add. You can be really frugal and make more than one card from a sheet, it’s all personal choice.

I have to say the only real success I have had with decoupage over all my years’ experience is when I have been using a glue gel. My choice is usually Pinflair or Collall – both work really well and make decoupage a delight to create. You can make 3D decoupage cards with foam squares but the end result looks very gappy in my opinion, with glue gel you can curve the edges and vary the heights.

If you have never tried decoupage, these sheets are a good place to start – and remember you may find it easier to snip everything out using a tool like decoupage snips – if you don’t want to use those than try for some really small but sharp scissors.

Happy cardmaking!

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