The origin of the willow pattern…

I know the most popular colourway relating to willow pattern… is blue, obviously. However, I think it looks good in a black silhouette too.

I have willow patterned everyday plates and blue and white pots and vases galore in my home. I love the romantic feel of the design and like the story that supposedly describes the images – I am quoting here from Wikipedia:

Once there was a wealthy Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter (Koong-se). She had fallen in love with her father’s humble accounting assistant (Chang), angering her father. (It was inappropriate for them to marry due to their difference in social class.) He dismissed the young man and built a high fence around his house to keep the lovers apart. The Mandarin was planning for his daughter to marry a powerful Duke. The Duke arrived by boat to claim his bride, bearing a box of jewels as a gift. The wedding was to take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree.

On the eve of the daughter’s wedding to the Duke, the young accountant, disguised as a servant, slipped into the palace unnoticed. As the lovers escaped with the jewels, the alarm was raised. They ran over a bridge, chased by the Mandarin, whip in hand. They eventually escaped on the Duke’s ship to the safety of a secluded island, where they lived happily for years. But one day, the Duke learned of their refuge. Hungry for revenge, he sent soldiers, who captured the lovers and put them to death. The gods, moved by their plight, transformed the lovers into a pair of doves (possibly a later addition to the tale since the birds do not appear on the earliest willow pattern plates

So when you are using a willow pattern die or stencil or stamp reflect on the sad demise of a mandarin’s daughter that had the misfortune to fall in love with an accountant … I won’t mention this to assorted members of my family that are either accountants or married to one!

These cards show off how striking the dies can look in black and they have set me wondering what it would look like as white images on black, or how about white on pale or dark blue? Love our craft!

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Howard Robinson’s Farmhouse

 

I always feel as though making a little decoupaged scene feels rather like creating a jigsaw puzzle – and I love puzzles! It may actually be that you have seen this image in a range of jigsaw puzzles as the artist Howard Robinson licenses quite a few of his creations to puzzle manufacturers around the world. It always makes me smile when I spot a puzzle from an image I recognise in a toy store.

There are twenty sheets to play with in the pack of Howard Robinson decoupage and it does feel like play. In this farmhouse picture, there’s the group of animals to arrange and it’s up to you how much detail and how many layers you choose to add. You can be really frugal and make more than one card from a sheet, it’s all personal choice.

I have to say the only real success I have had with decoupage over all my years’ experience is when I have been using a glue gel. My choice is usually Pinflair or Collall – both work really well and make decoupage a delight to create. You can make 3D decoupage cards with foam squares but the end result looks very gappy in my opinion, with glue gel you can curve the edges and vary the heights.

If you have never tried decoupage, these sheets are a good place to start – and remember you may find it easier to snip everything out using a tool like decoupage snips – if you don’t want to use those than try for some really small but sharp scissors.

Happy cardmaking!

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Joanna Sheen Cardmaking Collection

I know many of you will have spotted this Cardmaking Collection back in January when it was released, but we have had so much positive feedback from it – I’m so glad everyone has enjoyed playing with the freebies and the papers – that I thought it would be good to just mention it again.

There are many nice bits and pieces that come with the set – a FANTASTIC embossing folder, that I have loved and used and used, a jug on a lace tablecloth that just goes so brilliantly with the flowers in the kit or any other flowers you choose. The daffodil die is of course very appropriate as the daffs are all struggling to come out now the snow has cleared (at least down here in Devon it has!) and there are so many different designs you could create with this die.

I have to say thank you to some of Practical Publishing’s team that made some of the cards in this picture, Nicky Gilburt, Jo Boland and Sue Hughes. There are many more card designers that worked on this issue and I wish I could mention them all – they are a very talented team.

Also included in this kit is the pretty stencil and of course fabulous rubber stamps and not forgetting the sheets and sheets of backing papers and toppers.

Currently, we have a few copies left so if you fancy one, grab it now before they disappear forever – they never republish an issue!

 

 

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Dreaming of Thomas Kinkade summer cottages in the snow!

I am sitting warm and cosy, at my desk in deepest Devon, while outside there are quite a few inches of snow! It’s very unusual for us to have snow at all never mind this deep as we’re not far from the sea, which seems to keep things warmer. But not this winter… although is March still classed as winter?

So I thought a warm comforting selection of pictures would do us all good! Here you can see Thomas Kinkade at his best. Gorgeous summery cottages, flowers and peaceful fields and a pony or three that looks very content. Not so my daughter’s horse at the moment, I digress I know, but poor Bobby the grey horse is a very grumpy chap this morning. He has four blanket things on (can you tell I’m not horsey?) and has been given a warm breakfast and is still giving any human nearby the evil eye, assuming I guess that it could be any one of us that has caused the drop in temperature! Last night when tucking him into bed (believe me if they did 4 poster beds for horses she would buy him one) the temperature outside the stable was -6 degrees C …. I wouldn’t like to be out in that it has to be said, I have an electric blanket …. Result!

Anyway back to Thomas. These pictures are from our latest Thomas Kinkade pads, volume 5 and volume 6 and they are some of the best yet. I have tweaked the design slightly so you get co-ordinating backing papers contained within the pad and that seems to have hit a chord with many of you. For example that lovely red brick gate post has a matching red brick wallpaper in the pad, then there are frames and sentiments as well as the usual decoupage and borders. Lovely pads and very, very popular everywhere in the world that we sell to.

So all these three cards have main images and backing papers from the pads, have a look at our website and see if you fancy making a happy summery card today!

PS Apologies to those of you reading in other countries that are either hot and sunny currently, or like my friend Cheryl in Michigan, totally unimpressed by a measly inch or six of snow!

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The Mad Month of March!

Whenever the month of March arrives, I always think of Mad March Hares! As a child, I think we were all told about how they box and seem to go ‘mad’ and this eccentric behaviour endears us to this elusive mammal. Alice in Wonderland is also responsible for heightening the hare’s reputation, as it is one of the strange creatures stuck in an interminable tea party with the Mad Hatter and the Dormouse.

With its long ears, long legs and saucer eyes, the brown hare is a beautiful, yet sadly rare sight in most of this country. I have never seen one in the Westcountry, but I did see some when I lived in East Anglia, many moons ago. Once a common sight, it is thought the brown hare in the UK has decreased by up to 80% in the last century, thanks largely to changes in farming techniques. Where have we heard that before?

Long and brown and fantastically fast moving (up to 40mph!), the brown hare is a member of a group of mammals called Lagomorpha. For many years it was thought they were rodents but we now know that hares belong to their own separate family. The other common Lagomorpha is, of course, the rabbit.

Although vaguely similar, on closer inspection, there are several distinct differences between the two. While rabbits are known for having long ears, the ears of the brown hare are much longer and have black tips. As the two animals move, you can see that the back legs of a hare are much longer than on a rabbit – this makes it look like a rabbit hops and a hare sprints. Rabbits live underground in warrens whereas hares never go underground, preferring ditches along field edges.

Hares are famous for their energetic behaviour, and March, in particular, is when they are known to ‘box’ frantically with one another. These mad March hares are in their mating season, with the males (bucks) seeking out any females (does) that have come into season. However, it’s not the males that are responsible for the boxing (not with each other anyway) it’s the females who start the punch-ups! This usually happens when a male is being too pushy with a female, chasing her across fields in an attempt to mate. Eventually, when she has had enough, she’ll turn around and try to fend him off in a boxing match! Girl power!

Hare mythology has fascinated us for centuries. Ever since the Romans first brought them to Britain, hares have had a role to play in legend and myth. In hare mythology, the hare is a creature with pagan, sacred and mystic associations, by turns benign, cunning, romantic or, most famously in March – mad! We see images of hares everywhere, they are found in carvings on ancient buildings (particularly here in Devon) and are popular in paintings and statues of ‘moon-gazing’ hares are commonplace. The hare and the rabbit are often associated with moon deities and signify rebirth and resurrection.

A study in 2004 followed the history and migration of a symbolic image of three hares with conjoined ears. In this image, three hares are seen chasing each other in a circle with their heads near its centre. While each of the animals appears to have two ears, only three ears are depicted. The ears form a triangle at the centre of the circle and each is shared by two of the hares. The image has been traced from Christian churches here in Devon right back along the Silk Road to China, via western and eastern Europe and the Middle East.

 

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