Barbara Anderson flowers to bring a smile!

There’s nothing like a beautiful bunch of flowers to bring a smile to my face! Having said that, there are plenty of times when physical flowers are not an option. I know you can send flowers anywhere these days, but it does involve quite a bit of money and, sometimes, all you want to do is cheer someone up, or say ‘thank you’, or a million other reasons.

These cards can deliver beautiful flowers for you, although only 2D, not 3D, they are still gorgeous! The artist is Barbara Anderson. Barb is American and uses vintage floral images which she tweaks and twists and adds original little extras as varied as birds to calligraphy or teacups to wheelbarrows!

I only discovered Barb last year and I have really enjoyed working with her designs. We have two pads available, Collection One and Collection Two, and both pads give you 24 sheets to make cards, and almost everything you need is on that sheet. Just add blank cards, some of your time and a dab of glue!

I love using anything vintage – I define vintage as anything older than me – it makes me feel better! You can see here on the centre card I have added pearly buttons from my button box, which has inhabitants that have been there for generations. It was my grandmother’s box first, then my mother took it on and now I have it in my craft room. I must admit I rarely use the buttons on clothing – I add them to other craft projects because I think they are just so pretty.

So looking at all three cards, you can see that apart from a little extra cardstock and a blank card, these pads really do give you lots to work with and the results are pretty good I reckon.

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Thomas Kinkade’s beautiful skies

I chose to group these cards together to show off Thomas Kinkade’s talent when he painted skies. The light and the effects are just stunning, aren’t they?

He produced several pictures of boats and maritime-themed images but the central windmill scene is one of my favourite skies in the latest collection we have produced. These are from the Thomas Kinkade Pad 5 and Pad 6.

Judging by the hugely enthusiastic response we have had to the latest couple of Thomas Kinkade pads, the concept of mixing backing papers and images in the same pad is going to be a good ongoing idea.

You can see three of the papers included in the pads here – the stripes to the left and a couple of lovely cloudy skies. I do find it convenient having reached for the pad, almost everything I need is there at my fingertips! I am talking to the powers that be at Thomas Kinkade’s management team and hopefully we will have four new pads coming out in the next six months, including some very pretty Christmas ones.

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Burns’ Night cometh… the mystery of the haggis!

While wandering down an aisle in the supermarket last week, my mind on other things, I came to a sudden halt and I found myself staring at some alien looking things in the meat department. After the initial shock, I realised I had come across a pile of haggis, all ready for Burns’ Night on 25th January.

In my younger days, the prospect of a Burns’ Night Supper was quite fun as it usually involved plenty of energetic Scottish dancing and a jolly evening perfect for livening up a cold and grey January. But haggis? It has never been high on my list of likes. Oh, be honest Joanna, it’s high on your list of dislikes! But the whole Burns’ Night Supper always sounds so wonderfully wild and Scottish that it appeals to the romantic in me. Served alongside the haggis you have the marvellously named ‘rumblethumps’ (potato, cabbage and onion) or ‘neeps and tatties’ (swede and potatoes), followed by the magical sounding ‘Clootie dumpling’ (a suet and fruit pudding). If all that wasn’t enough to fill you up and keep you warm through a freezing Scottish night, you can always add a few drams of whisky!

As decreed in Burns’ great poem, the haggis is slit with a dagger!

So what is haggis? It is a savoury pudding containing sheep’s ‘pluck’ (heart, liver, and lungs); minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, traditionally encased in the animal’s stomach although nowadays, an artificial casing is often used. A cheap dish designed to waste nothing and use up scraps and offal; it isn’t something many people would choose today as they try to eat less meat. But if you want to enjoy the whole Burns’ Night atmosphere there are lots of vegetarian haggis (haggi?) on sale and plenty of recipes online if you want to make your own.

Haggis is Scotland’s national dish, thanks to Scots poet Robert Burns’ poem ‘Address to a Haggis’ of 1787, a Scottish dish through and through, you would think. But wait! The name ‘hagws’ or ‘hagese’ was first recorded in England in 1430! And it gets worse…

There’s evidence to suggest that the ancient Romans were the first known to have made products of the haggis type. Even earlier, a kind of primitive haggis is referred to in Homer’s Odyssey. The well-known chef, the late Clarissa Dickson Wright, said that haggis “came to Scotland in a longship” (from Scandinavia) even before Scotland was a single nation. So that’s another ‘tradition’ shattered!

We looked for the reclusive wild haggis but couldn’t find any photos, so here’s a gorgeous Highland cow instead!

Even though there may be evidence that the Scots didn’t invent haggis after all… they have come up with an alternative history that I think sounds perfectly reasonable. The wild haggis is a small Scottish animal, a smaller hairier version of a sheep. According to some sources, the wild haggis’s left and right legs are of different lengths, allowing it to run quickly around the steep mountains and hillsides that make up its natural habitat but only in one direction. It is further claimed that there are two varieties of haggis, one with longer left legs and the other with longer right legs. The former variety can run clockwise around a mountain (as seen from above) while the latter can run anticlockwise. The two varieties live happily alongside each other but are unable to interbreed in the wild because, in order for the male of one variety to mate with a female of the other, he must turn to face in the same direction as his intended mate, causing him to lose his balance and fall over!

PS. According to one poll, 33% of American visitors to Scotland believed haggis to be an animal

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Jane Shasky vibrant nasturtium card

I am rather fond of nasturtiums. Partly because they grow so easily and fight on regardless of how crummy the soil is… but also because their bright colouring attracts my little granddaughter and she keeps them regularly watered for me!

This image is from one of our Jane Shasky pads called Garden Herbs and the backing paper comes from Jane’s CD – From the Heart of the Garden. I know I say it often, but it is one of those really useful CDs you will use over and over again for many different projects. The papers are fab and so are the images.

The Garden Herbs card making pad has the same really useful selection of pictures on it. I find Jane’s work so easy to use and turn to it frequently. The die is from our Signature die range, Crocus SD470. It has been cut out on green card a couple of times and then a third time with white card and the flowers coloured and snipped off to paper piece the finished embellishment.

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New Year resolutions!

Just the one glass!

I always have a positive start to January with happy optimistic New Year resolutions and ‘things are going to change this year’ themed hopes and dreams. Then often they come crashing down when I mess up whatever my new intentions were.

Well why would that be I wonder? I suspect it’s because I set ridiculous targets. Unreachable changes are never going to happen in an instant. Habits like overeating, smoking or drinking are unlikely to magically change after the stroke of midnight on the 31st December.

I’m lucky in that I only have my ‘eating too much’ demons to conquer – smoking went out of the window nearly 40 years ago and I managed to slowly cut any alcohol I drink to a teensy minimum a year or two back. So I have hopes for 2018. The main thing for me is to eat healthy food and ‘behave’ 80% of the time and then hopefully the remaining 20% will be tolerable!

Learning Japanese… er, no.

One new year’s resolution many moons ago was to learn Japanese, I did try… however, I am not expanding my languages this year or any other year for now. I am also not planning to climb more than a local hill, so the climbing Everest and swimming the channel thoughts have been binned too!

There are other things that matter to me as resolutions though. Whether it’s an age related thing and my ambitions have mainly been met – my only thoughts and resolve right now are to help my family as much as I possibly can. To see if I can help shepherd granddaughter Grace though childhood and support my girls.

Mount Everest? I think not.

So I think this year my resolution is to pick up the phone, get in the car and generally stop relying on emails and Facebook for communicating with family – you only get one 2018 – so make the best of it and I want to feel happy next December that I did everything I could towards having a happier, well rounded life.

Happy New Year everyone, I wish us all health, contentment and laughter.

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