A bit of a swagger!

As I think many of you know, I have spent a great many hours of my life cutting, drying and arranging flowers both for work projects and also for my own personal pleasure, especially at Christmas. It’s a hobby I love and never tire of. Those of you who have read my latest novel ‘The Proof is in the Pudding’ will know that this keen interest of mine has even crept into a murder mystery!

But anything I have ever produced as a Christmas decoration pales into insignificance next the utterly extraordinary giant swag that, every Christmas, graces the Great Hall in Cotehele in Cornwall. Although this National Trust property dates back to Tudor times, the yuletide tradition of decking the Great Hall with a garland is a relatively recent one. Begun in the 1950s, the Christmas flower garland is now firmly established as one of Cotehele’s annual highlights.

Every November, gardeners and volunteers at Cotehele create the 60ft long Christmas garland using thousands of flowers grown on the estate. The giant swag hangs in the Great Hall throughout the festive season and, if you are anywhere near Saltash on the Cornwall/Devon border between now and 6th January 2018… I urge you to go! You will need to book, so do have a look on the website before you set off.

Preparations for the garland begin almost a year earlier in February when the flower seeds are sown and planted in early spring in the Cut Flower Garden. The gardeners pick them daily during the summer, strip their leaves and carefully hang them in the potting shed to dry. Stripping the leaves from each individual stem is one of the most time-consuming elements in the garland-preparation process. Typically, the gardeners would like about 30,000 flowers in the garland – yes THIRTY THOUSAND!!

One of the things I love about this magical project is that, rather than following a standard design, each year the garland is different and depends on which of the specially grown flowers have done well. The garland often includes ornamental grasses, paper daisy, paper rose, statice and garden thrift.

Creating the garland is a task that involves Cotehele’s gardeners and volunteers using scaffolding to add flowers into the growing festive display. The results are spectacular, not only because of the stunning visual impact the garland makes but also because of the months of work, skill and care that has gone into creating it.

Photo:  The Christmas swag at Cotehele – photo copyright National Trust, go to their website for more information and photos

 

8 Comments

Sunshine and swing seats

Ah yes, sunshine and swing seats… Now that summer is a distant memory, I thought I’d reminisce about the summers of my childhood with this pretty card. When I was little we used to go and visit my godmother deep in the country and the main thing I remember from her garden was a lovely swinging seat. I have always loved swings and the luxury of a wide and comfy seat with cushions while you are swinging – yes, I was easily entertained!

The background image on this card is from one of the new Jane Shasky pads, Birds in the Garden. All of Jane’s work is brilliant for cardmaking but the latest couple of pads, Garden Delights and Birds in the Garden are particular lovely.

On this card I have snipped up a Morning Glory Vine die and wound the pieces around the swing seat, which softens it and adds a lovely embellishment. The basic card is 8” x 8” which is a size I find really easy to work with.

8 Comments

A ‘Quick’ drink inspiration!

There is such an amazing renaissance going on in the gin world, it is quite extraordinary. When I was young, it was a Gordon’s and tonic, and that was it! Over time, the spirit seemed to dwindle in the face of more trendy offerings… now it is the ‘in’ thing and go into most pubs and there’s a selection of 10 and sometimes 20 gins to choose from. There are gin producers popping up all over the place, and while I am not suggesting we all need to start guzzling G&Ts, I think it’s a very positive development and is creating local jobs and generally promoting a ‘local’ product which has to be a good thing.

Copyright: Quick Gin

I featured Tarquin’s Cornish gin a while ago and have recently spotted a new gin on the block that is made in Exeter – given its bright orange bottle, it’s hard not to spot! Called Quick Gin, the producers use a wide range of botanicals (the herbs and spices used to give each gin its distinct flavour) – juniper berries, coriander seeds, orange peel, angelica root, cassia bark, orris root powder, lemon peel, liquorice root powder, nutmeg and cinnamon. They then infuse orange and a hint of almond to round off the gin. Hence the orange bottle!

Looking at Quick’s website, I see that they have all sorts of fun cocktail suggestions including one for Autumn, designed to enliven these long Autumn nights… well, it’s a good excuse, anyway!

Quick Gin’s Autumn Cocktail:

  • 25ml Quick Gin
  • 25ml Pimms
  • 25ml rhubarb syrup
  • 50ml apple juice
  • 25ml sugar syrup
  • 12.5ml lemon juice
  • Pinch of cinnamon

Add all of the ingredients to a shaker, add ice and shake. Strain over ice and garnish with an apple and orange twist.

Copyright: Seedlip.

For those of you that don’t drink alcohol or, like me, often look for non-alcoholic options, I also spotted this on a recent trip to Jersey to visit my sister Kate. Called Seedlip Spice 94, it is a non-alcoholic spirit, it’s made like a gin with botanicals, but is definitely not a gin. The predominant flavour is clove rather than juniper, and, most importantly, it has no alcohol! Perfect if you’re a designated driver or you’re just not drinking at the moment. Seedlip contains allspice, grapefruit, lemon peel, cardamom, American oak and cascarilla bark. Together, they make a fresh, warming drink that is full of flavour but is alcohol free.

3 Comments

Simple pleasures…

As we get older, I think we become more aware of ‘simple’ pleasures’, well I know I do! The smell of coffee brewing, freshly cut grass or hearing an owl hoot – all simple things that give immense pleasure.

I read the other day that Vita Sackville-West (she of Sissinghurst Garden fame, amongst other things…) used the term ‘through leaves’ to describe simple pleasures enjoyed by her family. She coined the phrase after “the small but intense pleasure of kicking through leaves while out walking”, which I thought was rather lovely.

Another classic, that I expect almost all of us know, are the lyrics to the song ‘My favourite things’ from the Sound of Music, including whiskers on kittens, warm woollen mittens and brown paper packages tied up with string.

It’s so easy to think that pleasures have to be big and expensive, like holidays, or fancy clothes… but I think we start to appreciate the simple things the more we experience life. You often hear people who have survived cancer, or cheated death in an accident or natural disaster, say how they appreciate every day, every moment, and are more aware of what’s around them.

I had a think about my ‘through leaves’ moments, and came up with the following list:

  • The smell of baking bread (thanks to Richard and his bread maker!)
  • Little Grace running towards me with her arms open
  • A beautiful sunset (or dawn, but that’s rare!)
  • Hearing my daughters say a casual I love you
  • Finishing a card and sitting back and thinking – that’s a keeper!

My co-author Julia was here (we were busy having a book signing session!) and I asked her, for her ‘Through leaves’ moments and she said:

  • Standing in the middle of her runner bean arch(!)
  • Being greeted by her dog, Moss, in the morning
  • Watching beech leaves unfurl in spring
  • Walks on frosty mornings
  • Birdsong

So what are your ‘through leaves’ moments? Do let me know… smiles, Joanna

 

18 Comments

Cosmos and hanging baskets

If you read the title and thought “You can’t put cosmos in a hanging basket” you would probably be correct!

There may be some mini ones I am not aware of but the glorious softly waving flowers at the back of my border would definitely not fit in a basket! No, the title refers to the mix on this card where I have embellished one of Jane Shasky’s amazing images with a die cut basket full of flowers.

The Signature dies I used for this were Hanging Basket and Flowers for Containers. The flower die was specially designed so you can fill the basket to size and choose how you colour them.

You could focus on bright reds as if it were a basket of geraniums, or if the card needs something soft and dgentle – how about cream, white and pale yellow? The joy of diecutting in white is playing with your markers to get something completely unique for your project.

The butterfly in the top right corner is snipped away from the diecut of Butterfly Cloud. The other butterflies all come on the sheet from the pad.

It’s a simple card but a fun change of colour combination for me, I did enjoy playing with this design.

10 Comments