It’s personal!

We all know how difficult it can be finding suitable shop-bought cards for special people and special occasions – with this card design, your problems are solved! Whether it’s a golden wedding celebration, a 21st birthday or a funny card to cheer someone up this photo card design is perfect for every event.

I’ve used an old sepia photo – but you could use a black and white or even a colour one instead. The flowers have all been produced using my pressed flower stamps and then coloured using Promarker pens.

The prettily shaped aperture is created with a diecutting machine and then the photo placed behind the cutout. The leaves and flowers are attached using Pinflair glue gel.

For a golden wedding card – you could use a picture of the bride and groom on their big day 50 years before, for a 21st birthday card – a photo of the subject as a baby or toothy toddler, or just a funny photo from a day out with a happy message to cheer someone up when they are poorly or have got the blues! What could be more personal and thoughtful than that?

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Pots of fun!

We’ve enjoyed some lovely spring days this week down here in Devon and, ever keen to get into the garden, I’ve been spring cleaning my garden pots and planters.

As I sorted through them I thought I’d like to ring the changes a bit but, as we are all watching the pennies these days, I thought rather than buy new, I’d spruce up what I’ve got with some stencilling.

Terracotta is a lovely, warm material and I do love having a selection of pots in different shapes and sizes. Oil-based stencil paints show up very well on unglazed terracotta. The only drawback is the depth of colour in terracotta that will show through the paint colour – but you can use that to your advantage and allow for it in your design. You’ll end up with a more natural, earthy look, which is very attractive, rather than something too bright and vibrant.

Large terracotta planters and containers that you want to use outside will need some all weather protection. Because painting varnish directly on to a design with a brush could cause smudges, I recommend using two coats of a spray varnish over the stencilled design first, before covering the whole pot with yacht varnish or another finish suitable for outdoor use.

You will need:

  • Plain terracotta pots
  • Stencil templates – I’ve used a heart-shaped one
  • Oil-based stencilling sticks in colours of your choice – go for fairly strong colours to show up against the terracotta
  • Size 2 and 4 stencilling brushes
  • Glass palette
  • Satin or matt aerosol spray varnish
  1. Using your first colour and holding the stencil firmly with your non-painting hand, stencil a few hearts randomly on the flowerpot.
  2. With your second colour, using the same heart stencil, add some more hearts to you pot, overlapping slightly. Or, you could keep them separate, or perhaps create a band of hearts around the top and bottom of the pot – the choice is yours.
  3. Taking your third colour, continue stencilling and add some more hearts. Gold and silver paints give a lovely effect.
  4. Give the flowerpot a good coat of spray varnish. If you want to make it weatherproof for outdoor use, give it another coat of spray varnish once the first has dried and then finish off with several coats of thicker out door varnish.

Of course you can use all sorts of stencils to create very different effects, it’s great fun and easy to do. Decorated flowerpots make a very attractive gift too.

And you don’t have to stop at pots, you can decorate other terracotta objects, such as kitchen storage jars and crockery in just the same way If the objects are to be used in the kitchen, they should be varnished to protect the design against the damaging effects of grease and dust.

Have fun!

 

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An egg-citing post…?

Did you know chickens lay blue eggs? No, neither did I until my Hen Pal presented me with a lovely eggy selection last summer which included a blue one.

I love hens, but don’t have time to keep them myself. Hen Pal currently has eight chickens and we are lucky in that we get a regular supply of gorgeous, totally free-range eggs. The yolks are a rich orange, not like anything you can buy, and they taste amazing.

The blue egg layer is a pretty chicken called Hetty and, just to confuse things further, she is a Cream Leg Bar! The blue eggs taste no different to the other eggs, but they just look so lovely…

Eggs are wonderful things – delicious to eat of course, but also fun to be creative with. Blowing eggs is not that difficult and you can still eat the egg so it’s not at all wasteful.

As a child, I loved blowing eggs and decorating them, why not have a go this Easter, it’s great fun!

How to blow an egg:

You need to ‘get the feel’ of your egg, grip it firmly enough, but not too hard so it breaks. If you always work over a bowl even if you break one you can still use the contents once you’ve picked any shell out!

First, grasp your egg! Insert a long needle into the large end of the egg to make a small hole. Work the needle around a bit to enlarge the hole slightly.

Then, do the same on the other end, but this time wiggle the needle more to make a bigger hole – this is the end the egg will come out from.

Push the needle into the centre of the egg and move it around to break up the yolk.

Now, place your mouth over the end with the smaller hole, the other end over a bowl and gently blow into the egg. It might take a few puffs before it starts to come out, but once going it will all come out with a few blows. If any of the egg gets stuck, shake the egg and give it a few more prods with the needle.

Rinse out the egg by running a thin stream of water into the larger hole, then blow out the water the same way that you blew out the egg. Leave to dry and then they’re ready to decorate.

And now – it’s up to you! Paint them, stick on sequins, draw on them with Promarkers or any other alcohol-based ink like the Spectrum Noir range. Great Easter gifts for old and young alike.

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A basket of flowers…

I thought it was about time I had a look at a card design – and I’ve chosen a really lovely one for you! The artist behind this series of 3D-decoupage is T.C.Chui and I just love all the flowery interior scenes we have chosen in this pack – such pretty pictures. The sheets are available from my website.

A basket of flowers on a card can be just the thing for so many different occasions and gives you the chance to add some pretty paper or silk flowers as embellishments.

The decoupage is made up using silicone glue or Pinflair glue gel – or alternatively you can use little foam pads. Then mat and layer on some pretty pink card and place on a seven or eight inch square base card with a fairly neutral backing paper. The fun can then begin with floral or die cut embellishments and ribbons!

With Valentine’s, Mother’s day and Easter looming, you can have great fun creating something really lovely and personal for those special people in your life.

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A very special celebration

A Baby’s Birth Date

Whether it’s your own baby or that of a friend or relative, it is lovely to commemorate the new celebration dayby surrounding the baby’s name and birth date with pressed flowers. The result is a unique gift that can be hung in the nursery. You could also add more details such as the baby’s weight and length. This would make a really super gift to bring when you visit a new baby and mum once they are home from hospital!

What you will need:

  • 25cm x 20cm (10in x 8in) frame with glass cut to fit and a hardboard back.
  • Cream or pale-coloured card, to fit the frame, with the baby’s name and date of birth either in calligraphy or printed from your computer.
  • A selection of pressed leaves and flowers
  • Latex adhesive – or any glue that starts white and dries clear

1. Start by positioning your chosen leaves to frame the wording, leaves with silver colouring were used in this project, but you could use any pressed leaf or even a paper diecut instead of real leaves.

2. Next, add dainty touches of gypsophila and heuchera or diecut flourishes. Follow these with larger flowers, in this case roses but whatever you choose would be fine.

3. To finish, add some more flowers – pink larkspur and hydrangea florets, the latter with potentilla centres forming the middles. When you are happy with the design, secure each item with adhesive, applying it with a large needle or cocktail stick. Cover the finished picture with clean glass and then fix it in the frame.

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