Cross-stitched herbal sachets

These pretty little sachets are made from a cross-stitch kit we sell, I wish I could say that I had stitched them but sadly … no time … but they were beautifully made for me by Gladys Dorr and don’t they look lovely!

I love having fragrance around the house and sachets and little bags of goodies feature heavily in many of the rooms here. Some I fill with lavender, little sachets for example in drawers and with the linen and towels in the airing cupboard. But sometimes I want a different effect, which is where making your own pot pourri comes in handy!

It depends what type of smell you enjoy the most – some people are very flowery, others prefer clean piney smells – I am very fond of citrusy smells and often use oranges and lemons for these projects.

This is a recipe for pot pourri I have used for many years:

Strawberry and orange preserve pot pourri

  • 2 cups chopped dried orange peel
  • 2 cups rose hips
  • ½ cup black peppercorns
  • 1 cup white peppercorns,
  • 1 cup strawberry leaves
  • 1 cup orris root soaked in 2tsp strawberry oil
  • 1 tsp sweet orange oil
  • A few drops of black pepper oil

Combine all the ingredients and leave to mature in a sealed ziplock bag for 3 weeks. Then display or fill little sacks like these.

Another idea is something much more feminine –  and dating back to Elizabethan times

Spiced roses for your linens

Rose petals dried in the shade with cloves ground to a powder and some dried mace.

As the recipe is so old there are no quantities but I used a large spoon of mace and clove combined with every cup or so of quite tightly packed rose petals. In Elizabethan times I am sure the rose petals would all have had a lovely smell, whereas today they rarely do. So add a few drops of rose essential oil before mixing everything together. Leave it overnight and then fill little bags.

Have a look on Google for a supplier of orris root or essential oils, they are fairly easy to find!

 

 

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Home made patchwork pine cones and baubles

I love the idea of having family treasures that come out every year and make a real tradition out of Christmas. My mother has been making these pretty decorations for many years and we all have special collections of examples she has made for us.

It’s easy to use different scraps of fabric for a colourful patchwork effect or you can plan a colour scheme and buy a small amount of fabric for your project. All you need are some polystyrene balls, your fabric and lots of little pins!

I like the idea of choosing a specific colour scheme or theme and making one for each of the family every year. You could write the date on in gold pen to make it a special piece that can go on the tree each year.

Making your own Christmas decorations is a rewarding way to spend some time as you can enjoy them hanging all through the festive period and then tuck them away safely to enjoy next year.

All the ingredients can be bought from Pinflair, who are colleagues of mine on TV – and very reasonably priced they are too!

There are lots of places on the internet that have great tutorials showing you how to make these ornaments so here are some links for easy access – have fun!

Fabric pine cone

Pine cone ornament

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House-Mouse mathematics!

Every design we have featuring the House-Mice makes me smile. Ellen Jareckie the artist has an amazing talent and a gift for just adding a spot of humour to everything she draws. Here the mice are checking their homework but in terms of seeds, oats and raisins!

I have sent House-Mouse cards to all ages, both male and female – their humour seems to appeal to so many different people – I am such a fan – oops you knew that already!

This card is pretty simple to make. Layer the main decoupage image up on some lilac card and the sentiment too. Then build up the decoupage using Pinflair glue gel, or similar.

Using an 8” x 8” scalloped card – add some layers of lilac card and a toning backing paper, rounding off the corners to blend with the scalloped edges. Add the decoupaged image at a jaunty angle, then add the sentiment beneath it.

Finally embellish with silk or paper leaves and flowers and a butterfly with a bit of sparkle!

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Scenting pinecones

Now is definitely one of my favourite times of year for scavenging and trawling the local paths and woods. Pine cones are of IMMENSE use to a crafter and can be used so many different ways, but my particular favourite is to use them as a Christmas pot pourri.

The fibrous material that makes up a pine cone is also, fortuitously, really good at retaining scents. So I capitalise on this ability and have a lovely big basket or bowl of pine cones near the open fire, or around in the kitchen throughout the dark wintery season.

The first and most important task is to dry out the pine cones – take great care as small bugs seem to lurk and these need to be removed. Start by shaking each cone well, outside on a sheet of newspaper. Tap it and give it a good shake – some people wash them in a very dilute bleach solution, again to eradicate any bugs – I usually just shake them a bit and then the drying process sorts out bugs as you will see. However the bleaching technique can be used to vary the colours of the cones in your collection if you’d like some lighter ones.

Once you are happy they are well shaken, bring them indoors and arrange on a wire cake rack, over a baking sheet and put in a very low oven (sort of thing that would be perfect for an Aga if you have one!) and leave for 4-5 hours. This should dry them nicely – if they were sopping wet then you might need a little longer – just check them and see.

Then decide what fragrance you want – either a bought pot pourri oil (like a refresher oil) or your own mixture of essential oils. Drop some oil onto each cone, stick them in a sealable plastic bag and leave for 24 hours or more. Then bring out of the bag and arrange in your chosen container. The scent can then be topped up by dropping oil onto the cones and shuffling them around in their container.

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Elegant Birdboxes!

We feed our birds with very basic lumps of fat and seedballs, and they build nests under the thatch and in the ivy that covers the house. But I can still dream of having pretty bird boxes like these but I’m not sure a very rural Devon bird would choose ‘new’, ‘improved’ housing over the eaves with which they are so familiar and comfortable!

But that aside, this is one of my favourite cards that shows the beautiful Jane Shasky stamps and it demonstrates yet again what beautiful effects you can get when colouring with Promarkers.

The basic scalloped ivory card is layered with some pale blue card and a strip of calligraphy backing paper from the Jane Shasky CD. The main image isn’t layered as it appears, it is edged with the chisel tip of a Promarker, as is the cream layer beneath it. This is a fabulous way of getting the layered effect without the expense of extra card.

The birdbox has been coloured using a Blush Promarker but there are lots of other beige/pale wood colours you could use – caramel for example. When it comes to the flowers, stay really pale or they will overwhelm the entire card – here they are soft and match the blue card really well.

One final note – the whole of the stamped image has been surrounded with a very pale grey – this brings the whole coloured image together and looks really effective I think. Finish off with some self-adhesive pearls and the ‘Thank You’ sentiment has been edged with the blue Promarker too.

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