Elegant Birdboxes!

We feed our birds with very basic lumps of fat and seedballs, and they build nests under the thatch and in the ivy that covers the house. But I can still dream of having pretty bird boxes like these but I’m not sure a very rural Devon bird would choose ‘new’, ‘improved’ housing over the eaves with which they are so familiar and comfortable!

But that aside, this is one of my favourite cards that shows the beautiful Jane Shasky stamps and it demonstrates yet again what beautiful effects you can get when colouring with Promarkers.

The basic scalloped ivory card is layered with some pale blue card and a strip of calligraphy backing paper from the Jane Shasky CD. The main image isn’t layered as it appears, it is edged with the chisel tip of a Promarker, as is the cream layer beneath it. This is a fabulous way of getting the layered effect without the expense of extra card.

The birdbox has been coloured using a Blush Promarker but there are lots of other beige/pale wood colours you could use – caramel for example. When it comes to the flowers, stay really pale or they will overwhelm the entire card – here they are soft and match the blue card really well.

One final note – the whole of the stamped image has been surrounded with a very pale grey – this brings the whole coloured image together and looks really effective I think. Finish off with some self-adhesive pearls and the ‘Thank You’ sentiment has been edged with the blue Promarker too.

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Pretty cards with pressed flowers

Pressed flowers can look so pretty when used as a simple decoration on a card that I feel you don’t always need a picture as well – here the words and embellishments are enough.

If you have never tried pressing flowers then it’s worth a go as it’s so rewarding. There are instructions on pressing flowers on the tuition section of our website. However if you want to get started right away, or experiment with flowers on cards instantly, then you can buy packs of ready pressed flowers from the website too.

Start by deciding which die you would like to use and the words. This will obviously depend on what stamps you have (this is from our Wordy stamps) and which dies. The labels series from Spellbinders is very handy and any one of those may be perfect, depending on the shape of the words you are going to stamp. Create several layers under the words as shown in the photo.

The base is cream and the layers are an olive green, then some more cream that has been embossed with a folder (Cuttlebug’s Swiss dots is a perennial favourite) and the edge punched with border punch. So, layer some green card, then a piece of tonight backing paper, add the cream embossed card and then wrap some dotty ribbon around this stack. Attach this to the blank card.

Add some flourishes and a rose, rosebud and touch of gypsophila to each corner. Then cut a sheet of acetate to the size of the card blank and hold down in each corner with a pretty brad. This covers and protects the pressed flowers as people simply cannot resist rubbing them (and destroying the card) when they receive it!

Finally add the layered words on top of the acetate.

 

 

 

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Get down and dirty this autumn!

This week, my hen pal, Julia, reports back on a recent willow hurdle making course as a guest blog and gives some interesting alternatives to your usual pruning… whether I have the strength and enthusiasm to follow suit I’m not sure but it makes interesting reading!

I‘ve been at it again – tackling willow that is! After my success at making willow sculptures I set off full, of confidence, on a course to make willow hurdles. I think they are lovely – so aesthetically pleasing and great as fences, screens or edges. I’ve always wanted some in my garden but was put off by the prices. “Easy, I’ll just make my own!” I thought… wrong!

To start – sturdy, straight hazel poles were stuck at 6” intervals into a sleeper, to give the uprights to then weave around. Despite having a very good tutor, the initial ’tie’ that makes the free-standing hurdle secure at its base is really complex and is an utterly exhausting process! Despite being shown twice, I’m not sure any of us actually ‘got it’.

The first few hours of the day were spent on my knees shuffling side to side across by 6ft hurdle’s length, weaving the willow. Then, as the hurdle grew in height I was able to stand but had to maintain a very uncomfortable bent stance and my hands and thumbs became increasingly sore and tired.

At the end of the day, I came home with a respectable looking hurdle. My other half did say ‘It looked like a proper one’, so it wasn’t a complete disaster – but wow, was I shattered! I now appreciate the work involved and why they are so expensive!

However, talking to the tutor, and others on the course, I realised that you don’t have to weave structures in such a structured way. You can ‘have a go’ with all sorts of off cuts and whippy bits of shrubs and trees. If you fancy weaving a little bit of fencing – perhaps to edge a flower bed, or to form a small retaining fence on a slope, you can simply stick some sturdy off-cuts of hazel, or a thick stemmed shrub (all leaves removed) into the ground where you want the structure to be – and start weaving. As your structure is fixed and isn’t free-standing, the initial ‘tie’ isn’t essential. You can weave with long whips cut from pretty much anything. Dogwood, for example, is lovely, as the stems are a wonderful red colour.

It just so happens that it’s a bit of a bumper year for growth – with all the rain we’ve had, I’ve got shrubs 12 to 15ft high in my garden. So, rather than trimming with hedge clippers as I would normally, I am going to get down and dirty and get in underneath the shrubs and prune some of the really long stems at the base so I end up with long whips that I can then use to weave my mini hurdles. Don’t get carried away though – make sure you prune things at the right time.

What have you got to lose? If it goes wrong, pull it out and have another go. It will cut down on the clippings that you’ll need to burn or shred, the leaves you strip off can all go into leaf mulch and, if it works, you’ll get some really pretty and useful structures in your garden. There’s lots of information on the internet – go on, have a go!

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Rustic charm…

Isn’t this a pretty card? This image is from the Jane Shasky CD. I have lost count of how many times I have got this CD out of the case and felt sure there was going to be something that would suit a specific card or project I had in mind. There are so many lovely ideas on there. As you know I am very enthusiastic about herbs and so the images really do inspire me over and over again!

The printing has been done on a cream textured paper this time which adds a nice extra touch to the design. The cream card base is approximately 8” x 8” and the next layers are dark green and then some of the textured cream. Wrap some sage green ribbon around these and tie with a knot (makes a nice change from a bow) and then attach to the card blank with 2mm foam to give a bit of a lift.

The topper is constructed by using three same size toppers. One is the background, a second has the herbs cut out and then decoupaged onto the base. The third has a cream border left around it and the centre removed with a sharp craft knife and ruler. I often find a glass mat helps a craft knife cut more easily.

Layer the base image onto dark green and gold and attach to the card. Then using some string, knot a couple of pieces top right and bottom left across the frame and fix onto the card with foam tape.

This card is so pretty I am sure someone would tuck it away as a keepsake!

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Triple fold envelope card

This sumptuous and very special card will delight anyone who receives it. It can be made in a variety of sizes, some people love making huge cards, some very small – I would aim for somewhere in the middle.

To make the basic card you need a triple fold – so three panels of equal width. I used an A3 sheet to start with but you can also buy triple fold card blanks (from Craft Creations) if you don’t like having larger sheets of card in stock!

Once you have the triple fold then using a guillotine of just a pencil, ruler and scissors, trim the out fold into a triangle to create the envelope concept. Then using flowers from “If Flowers Could Talk”, decorate the edge of the envelope ‘flap’. The strip at the bottom can simply be a couple of strips of gold peeloffs or you can layer a thin strip of matching card onto gold mirri and attach it to the main card. The butterfly and wording are both peeloffs to but could just as easily be die cuts.

The inside is simply constructed with an insert from that same CD which features the words from Patience Strong together with artwork from Jayne Netley-Mayhew. Layer the insert onto some backing paper to fill the inside panel of the card and decorate.

The basic idea of this card is so very versatile it can be tweaked to produce lots of different creations depending on the images and ideas you have. Have a go and see what you think!

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