Turning ‘nothing’ into ‘something’

Whether you refer to it as Folk Art, Barge Art, Canalboat Art – or even the modern version One Stroke or Fusion Painting – they all cover roughly the same territory. The artwork is bold and simplistic and once tutored, even a relative beginner can produce some really fun pieces of artwork.

Many moons ago my mother and I signed up for barge art evening classes and for ages, we plagued the entire family with decorated gifts for birthdays, Christmas, anniversaries – you get the drift! But joking aside, it is a fun way to decorate the most inexpensive household bits and pieces.

These enamel items are all painted using glossy paint (small pots of Humbrol) but you could use other mediums on cards or canvas. I think it’s a great way to pretty something up and it encourages me horribly to hoard more dilapidated bits and pieces ‘for when I have time…’!

We’ve decorated wonderful flat irons, horseshoes, hat boxes, coal scuttles, washing up brush containers, bottles, trays, jars… the list is endless, and many of these bits and pieces we managed to collect for nothing.

One of the joys of crafting I guess… turning nothing into something and creating a really pretty thing that takes pride of place in your home!

Smiles, Joanna

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Lovely lavender…

Lavender is one of my favourite plants – to grow, to dry, to use in pot pourri and to cook with (truly lavender cookies are yummy!). I wrote a whole little book about Lavender many years ago and it’s just a wonderful, wonderful addition to any garden.

This card mixes a lavender backing sheet and image from our Jane Shasky CD and some parchment stamped with our AMAZING lace stamps. If you haven’t played with them yet, I think they prove just how accurately and beautifully a rubber stamp can be made.

The way to get the best from the stamps is to stamp on parchment using Versamark and then some detail white embossing powder. I choose to heat from behind when embossing with the heat gun as I can keep a really sharp eye on when the powder starts to turn and whip the heat away so that I use the least heat possible and so slim down my chances of spoiling the parchment with too much heat.

Nothing brings a smile to a girl’s face like lavender and lace and maybe even a fragranced card – why not keep the card in a drawer with some lavender or some cotton wool with drops of lavender oil dotted on it – just don’t let the oil touch the card!



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Marvellously marbled

Marbled paper is one of my favourite things – I love the blends of colours, especially if it has a bit of gold in it. When I went to Venice for the weekend, it was the stationery shops I couldn’t keep away from – oh well and the lace shops. Never mind the amazing scenery, give me craft ideas!!

You can buy real hand-marbled paper as I have got here – or you can get printed marble paper – which can look just as nice and can be easier to find. The sheets used to cover this chest of drawers are wrapping paper-sized which means no joins but you could use something smaller.

You can also do much easier projects like covering notebooks to make a really special present. I use PVA glue or you could try Pinflair bookbinding glue.

There’s something really tactile and special about covering things in pretty papers, I suppose it’s making them ‘yours’, putting your stamp on something…. I remember covering my exercise books at school – didn’t help the content much, but they looked good!

There are oh so many places you can pick up books, box files, little chests, tiny cupboards etc. Try Ikea, for example, and have a search online.

Another idea I have used successfully is covering papier mache shapes – heart shaped boxes, frames – the choices are endless, so just get Googling!

The other thing you could try if you were feeling really ambitious is to marble some paper yourself. I am a bit cautious about it and would rather skip to the covering stage – but hey I bet it might be fun to experiment!

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Shellcraft

We are so lucky to live near the coast and beachcombing is great fun. Sadly, I don’t have as much time to do this as I’d like but, whenever I do, I always keep my eyes open for pretty shells and interesting shaped bits of driftwood and pieces of dried seaweed as you never know when they might come in handy…

I wonder how many of you have tried using shells? The finished results can range from really rather yukky seaside ornaments (that aren’t even made in the UK!) to works of complete and utter beauty that can be found in museums and art galleries.

My Mum’s work comes somewhere in the middle – I would say they are definitely of complete beauty but I do realise I am utterly and forever biased – so I am trying to seem fair!

I have used shells many, many times in craft work and you can get the most amazing results. Here are a few tips to help you get the best results when working with shells:

If you are doing something small – as these boxes are – scale down the size of shells that you use.

A detailed little mosaic of miniscule treasures is going to look amazing – clunky lumps of big shells just don’t do it.

I have used shells mainly for mirror frame decoration – so I upgrade the size slightly but again try and go for a more complex intertwining shell look. I usually mix with preserved ivy or something soft and feathery like silk foliage to fill the gaps and balance the strength and angles of the shells. You really can create some beautiful effects.

Experiment with several glues before you make your definitive masterpiece.

Nothing is more infuriating than shells dropping off or not standing the test of time. I have used a dozen different glues over the years but I would say the most useful ones have been pinflair glue gel, hot glue and tacky PVA. In all cases I would ensure you have a fine nozzle rather than gloops of glue – it’s never a good look!

There are lots of places online that sell shells and the little ones look fab on cards – the huge ones are a work of art in themselves – why not have a play? And next time you are on a beach, make sure you keep your eyes peeled!

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It’s personal!

We all know how difficult it can be finding suitable shop-bought cards for special people and special occasions – with this card design, your problems are solved! Whether it’s a golden wedding celebration, a 21st birthday or a funny card to cheer someone up this photo card design is perfect for every event.

I’ve used an old sepia photo – but you could use a black and white or even a colour one instead. The flowers have all been produced using my pressed flower stamps and then coloured using Promarker pens.

The prettily shaped aperture is created with a diecutting machine and then the photo placed behind the cutout. The leaves and flowers are attached using Pinflair glue gel.

For a golden wedding card – you could use a picture of the bride and groom on their big day 50 years before, for a 21st birthday card – a photo of the subject as a baby or toothy toddler, or just a funny photo from a day out with a happy message to cheer someone up when they are poorly or have got the blues! What could be more personal and thoughtful than that?

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