Remember rosemary…

I think most of us tend to think of the herb rosemary alongside roast lamb, I know I certainly do! But there’s much more to this zingy Mediterranean herb than you might think…

Its Latin name means ‘dew of the sea’, possibly because in its natural habitat it often grows on the sea cliffs of the Mediterranean. It is a hardy evergreen shrub and, once established, will chug on happily in most gardens throughout the year. It comes in compact and trailing varieties and really is a bit of a gem.

It is a plant I love to have in my garden, not just to because it is so wonderfully pungent and fresh when picked, but because of its delicate lilac-blue flowers that appear in winter to bring cheer. Brush against it on the coldest of days and the fragrance transports you to warmer climes… The flowers are edible and give a sweeter, lighter flavour than the leaves. What could make a prettier addition to a winter salad?

Rosemary planted as a hedge outside a local school… lovely for little hands to brush against.

Fresh or dried leaves can be used to flavour meat, soups and many other dishes, while sprigs steeped in olive oil give it a distinctive flavour. It’s becoming more common to see recipes for fish using rosemary and, given where it grows in the Mediterranean, that’s really no surprise. I think it works really well.

It is also surprisingly good in some sweet recipes – add a teaspoon of dried rosemary to an ice cream mix before making it. It’s particularly good with peach, strawberry, and lemon flavours. Or, why not try making this simple syrup and add it to summer drinks:

Rosemary syrup

  • 250ml of water
  • 200g granulated sugar
  • 2 good sprigs of rosemary
  1. Put all the ingredients into a pan, heat gently until the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Bring to the boil and simmer for a few minutes.
  3. Leave it to cool and then pour it into a jar, rosemary sprigs and all, and store in the fridge. Simply add a splash of rosemary syrup to cold drinks, such as orange juice, lemonade… or even a gin and tonic!

Tea made by infusing chopped leaves in boiling water helps digestion, so it’s no surprise to learn that rosemary belongs to the same family as mint, also a great choice for aiding digestion.

In the Middle Ages, rosemary was associated with wedding ceremonies. The bride would wear a rosemary headdress, while the groom and wedding guests would wear a sprig of rosemary. I went to a wedding last year where the corsages included rosemary, they looked (and smelled) wonderful!

Rosemary has a reputation for improving memory and has been used as a symbol of remembrance during war commemorations and funerals. Mourners would throw it into graves as a symbol of remembrance for the dead. And in case we were left in any doubt, even The Bard mentions it. In Hamlet, Ophelia says, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.”

 

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Get well again soon!

Oh dear – January the month of coughs and sneezes and all things cold related – I thought I ought to have a get well soon card as the theme for today. If any of you have a nasty old cold then get well soon, but also if you have a friend or family member that’s suffering – send them a get well wish to speed things along!

There are so many things people recommend for coughs and colds and we all have our favourite tips and tricks. The main thing I was always told was drink lots and lots (not alcoholic!) – my choice is often just plain water but I often make up a jug with lots of slices of cucumber in it, a slice or two of lime or lemon or even satsumas. This, after it has been in the fridge for a while, is wonderfully refreshing and fractionally less boring than plain water!

Another favourite of mine are all the new flavoured green teas – have you tried Twinings salted caramel or fudge melts flavoured green tea? No calories to worry about and I am really keen on it at the moment (drinking a fudge melts one as I type). There are loads of fruity and flavoured teas on the market these days, hot and refreshing and, no doubt cool, and refreshing if I were to make up a jug and put in the fridge this summer.

Anyway I am going off track! I added this card as today’s blog as I wondered if it might inspire you to send a card to a neighbour, friend or relative that’s under the weather for whatever reason – you can rely on House-Mouse to cheer someone up!

Ingredients

Instructions

This is a nice straightforward card, so doesn’t take long to make – trim some raspberry card slightly larger than the main image and another piece to just less than the 8″ square main card. Then cut some aqua card slightly smaller again than the main raspberry.

Run the aqua through your die cutter to get the lovely arch edge to it. If you feel unsure, then do this first by cutting say a piece 8″ x 8″ and then trimming once you have added the edge so that it’s smaller than the raspberry card.

Now using double sided tape (or your choice of glue) add the raspberry to the card blank. Then layer on the aqua. Cut out the main topper and layer onto the smaller piece of raspberry card and attach.

Then simply decorate each of the top corners with a plaster (made me smile as I was doing that!). Now hand deliver or pop in the post.

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Lisa Audit artwork

happyanniversaryroseIf you haven’t had a look at our Lisa Audit Cardmaking pads yet… you should! Her work is so pretty, contemporary and useful for, oh, so many cards. They are lovely.

The nice thing about our paper pads is that everything you need to get you started on a card is there and then you can add embellishments or backing papers as you desire.

With this card, several Signatures dies have been used – our rose tea set and our Harriet Lace Edger down the right-hand side.

To complement the teapot there’s a fun little tea bag and string bow, and the bunting in the top right is one of our Signature shapes.

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French China and hydrangeas…

CulinaryBirthdayI have said before that Hydrangeas are one of my favourites and here’s another example of how pretty they look. Fresh hydrangea popped in a teacup with another flower or two – lovely!

I follow various vintage–inspired interior design companies on Facebook and I get so much pleasure from little cameos of flowers in old china, or just old china on its own! I keep promising myself that I will redo my kitchen cupboards and arrange vintage china beautifully on every shelf… hmm maybe not, I might be too busy, nice thought, though.

It may be wonderful and contemporary to get all your household contents from IKEA, or somewhere equally minimalist but, for me, it will never have the appeal of collecting oddments from older members of the family and arranging them on shelves and window sills. I have about twenty little jugs of various sizes and I love the way they look as a collection. If I had more space I would love to collect teapots or teacups and saucers. I saw a collection the other day beautifully displayed – vintage Tupperware – hmm mine just looks beaten up and not attractive at all and is bunged in the cupboard over the freezer!

But the romantic in me inspired me to choose this artist – Stefania Ferri – she has some wonderful vintage–inspired looks which we have translated into card ingredients in the pad – I love it! Here’s how to make this card.

Ingredients:

  • Stefania Ferri paper pad
  • Joanna Seen Paper Collection volume 3
  • Signature Dies Hydrangea and Wild Rose
  • 8” square white card blank
  • Pink, Green and burgundy cardstock
  • Assorted glue and tape

Technique:

  1. Take some burgundy paper from the papers pad and layer some of the hessian look paper on top. Cut the main topper from the sheet and the small decoupage piece. Also, cut out the border strip featured on that page and the sentiment. (Brilliant that it’s all on one page I think.)
  2. Attach the hessian layered paper to the card blank, then add the decorated border. I do this with double sided tape. Now add the main topper and build the small amount of decoupage with some glue gel. Add the sentiment in the position shown.
  3. Now cut the roses and hydrangeas. Make sure you lift the rose petals to give some movement and likewise with the hydrangeas. If you wanted to you could add pearls in the centre of the roses. All of the die cuts have been fixed onto the card with glue gel.
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Tea for two

TeaCupBirthdayFor the last 100 years at least, “I’ll just pop the kettle on” has been the British way of handling life. If in doubt … have a cup of tea. Things not going right … have a cup of tea. Long and difficult discussion to have with a family member, I’ll just get the kettle on!

The older members of my family were complete tea-aholics drinking many, many cups a day. But now as the younger generation comes through and flourishes, not so many of them are tea drinkers. I’m a bad example as I mainly drink coffee, then switch to peppermint or ginger tea after lunch, but my daughters – not a sign of a hot drink, what did I do wrong? My younger daughter quite likes mint tea made with fresh mint leaves (bet nobody in the office makes her one of those!) but apart from that, neither of them have anything except water. Goodness me, my granny would be amazed!

I always love sending a card with a tea bag hidden inside it as a little extra – just makes the handmade card even more of a little present. Here’s how to make this card:

Ingredients

Technique

  1. Cut some lilac card to slightly smaller size than the card blank and then white smaller again and layer. Attach to main card using thin foam tape or sticky pads.
  2. Die cut the cups and teapot in white and then stick some scraps of lilac card behind the rose design.
  3. Die cut the Clarissa die in white and trim to fit the card, attach with glossy accents glue or a quickie glue pen.
  4. Now cut a plain circle in the Kraft card and layer onto a scalloped circle in lilac card about 3½” diameter. Attach the teapot and cups using glue gel and curve them slightly.
  5. Die cut the wild rose in cream and green – or you could do it all in white and colour with alcohol pens. Attach to the card as shown.
  6. Finish the card with some flat back pearls and the printed out sentiments.
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