Spiced Christmas cupcakes

Here are some really sparkly spicy Christmas cupcakes guaranteed to be popular with everyone! The pretty poinsettia baking cups make the cakes look so festive… and if you haven’t tried the clever cupcake plunger yet – do give it a go. Easy to use and very effective.

To make the cake:

  • 110g brown sugar
  • 75g plain flour
  • 75g self-raising flour
  • ¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1tsp ground ginger
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp freshly ground nutmeg
  • 100g butter, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 50ml buttermilk (you can use normal milk too)
  • 2 tbsp golden syrup

Preheat oven to 180ºc (160ºc fan). This mix is enough to make six large poinsettia baking cups and six small poinsettia baking cups. 

Put all the dry ingredients into a large bowl and mix until combined. Put all wet ingredients into another large bowl and mix until combined. Then combine both together.

Divide the mixture evenly between baking cups and bake for 25 minutes for the large cakes and 15 minutes for the small cakes. Once cooked, leave to cool completely before decorating.

To make the mincemeat filling:

2tbsp mincemeat, homemade or shop bought.

1-2tbsp Icing sugar

Warm mincemeat and add Icing sugar to sweeten, put to one side to cool. Use a cupcake plunger to cut centres out of large cakes and fill with fruit mince, add as much or a little fruit mince as you like.

(If you want to make your own mincemeat check out my recipe in the filo pastry brandied mincemeat blog)

To make the butter cream:

  • 220g butter, softened
  • 400g icing sugar
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • 3-4 tbsp milk

Combine butter, icing sugar, vanilla and enough milk to make the mixture easy to pipe. Fill piping bag and pipe onto cakes, add decorations, here I have added edible silver stars and fondant snowflakes.

 

0 Comments

Brandied mincemeat filo waterlilies

If you fancy a change from the traditional mince pie this year, why not try these? I personally prefer filo to shortcrust pasty – try them and let me know what you think!

Serves about eight. 

You will need:

For the brandied mincemeat

This recipe makes enough for 6 x 1lb jars and as an alternative you could try ginger wine or whisky instead of the brandy!

  • 450g apples, peeled and cored
  • 225g suet
  • 350g sultanas
  • 250g raisins
  • 225g currants
  • 225g candied peel (chopped)
  • 3 oranges (grated rind and juice)
  • 1 lemon (grated rind and juice)
  • 50g flaked almonds
  • 4tsp ground mixed spice
  • ½ teaspoon each nutmeg and cinnamon

Mix all the ingredients together in an ovenproof bowl, cover with foil and stand in the oven heated to 120ºC/225ºF/Gas ¼ for about three hours. Take the bowl out and allow to cool, then mix in the alcohol and spoon into clean, dry jars. Cover and seal as usual.

For the waterlillies 

  • Approx 20 sheets of filo pastry
  • 225g (8oz) melted butter 

Using good kitchen scissors, cut the filo pastry into 5 – 5.75cm (2-21/2 inch) squares. Cut a stack at once, don’t do them one at a time or you really will be there until Christmas! Keep the pastry covered with a clean damp cloth as much as possible to avoid it drying out. Butter a nine-hole bun tin and place a square of pastry over the hole. Brush the top of the pastry with melted butter and cover with another square of pastry, placing the second square at an angle. Continue to layer about 5 sheets of pastry, buttering in between and rotating each square a little each time to give a petalled edge effect – see diagram. Fill each pastry case with between 10 – 15g (1dsp to 1tbs) of mincemeat and bake in a pre-heated oven at 160ºC (325ºF), gas mark 3 for 45 minutes.

 

 

5 Comments

Remember, remember the 5th November…

… gunpowder, treason and plot! Ah, the smell of bonfires, gunpowder – we had many wonderful family parties on Guy Fawkes night when I was a child.

My parents always had their respective jobs – Father would disappear purposefully down to the bottom of the garden wearing his gardening jacket, “Come along John dear, the nights are drawing in, don’t forget your scarf”. Meanwhile, my Mother would have spent hours in the kitchen cooking up a ‘feast’ that invariably consisted of jacket potatoes, sausages, occasionally baked beans with apple pie and cream for pudding.

We children would all be trying hard not to get over excited (not sure one can ever be over excited – just more excited than usual maybe!) and would restlessly tackle puzzles, or try and read books and keep busy – anything to make the time go faster until it was dark enough for the fun to begin.

I must have been about 12, the year of the disaster. As was tradition, we had all moved to the end of the garden where a small bonfire glowed and the Black & Decker workmate had been turned into a table, where the box of fireworks was laid out in readiness for the ‘grand display’.

We could never afford many fireworks, I think I remember about £2-£3 being the family budget. This would have been spent on carefully chosen favourites – sparklers, Catherine wheels, Roman candles… one called a chrysanthemum I remember and, inevitably, in that selection were the dire and dreaded jumping jacks… how I hated them!

This particular year we were huddled round the small bonfire, eagerly anticipating the first Roman candle… my father struck a match with a flourish – and a spark leapt into the box of waiting fireworks sitting on the trusty workmate. We were treated to an amazing, if somewhat scary display of jumping, shooting, whizzing fiery noisiness for about one minute … and that was that! The whole box was gone in a single flash.

Ah sad memories, the over 40s were inconsolable, the children thought it was hilarious if a bit short lived and we have teased my father with the story ever since. But they were happy and simple times, when a sparkler and a jacket potato were really all you needed – my precious memories of 5th November.

6 Comments

Hot Brie with hazelnuts on a watercress sauce

Have to say, this is one of my favourite recipes. The warm gooey-ness of the rich cheese is very comforting and, as I feel the inevitable arrival of Autumn (after no summer at all) it seems rather timely… sigh….

I love Brie, but you can make this with another cheese if you prefer. Great as a dinner party starter (as per this recipe), or a delicious veggie main meal perhaps made using two different types of cheese, camembert is another good one… it’s up to you.

You will need:

  • 350g (12oz) ground hazelnuts
  • 225g (8oz) granary breadcrumbs
  • 675-900g (1/2-2lb) small whole Brie
  • 50g (2oz) self-raising flour
  • 4 large eggs, beaten

For the Watercress Sauce

  • 1 bunch fresh watercress
  • 1 handful of fresh parsley
  • 30g (2 tbsp) fresh chives
  • 15g (1tbsp) fresh dill
  • 100g (4oz) plain Greek yoghurt
  • 30ml (2 tbsp) mayonnaise
  • 22ml (12 tbsp) lemon juice
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Sprigs of watercress for decoration 

The Brie

Mix the hazelnuts and breadcrumbs together. Cut the Brie into eight equal pieces. Coat each piece with flour then brush on the egg, or dip the cheese in the egg, and roll in the crumb mixture. Dip the cheese in the egg a second time and roll it in the nuts and breadcrumbs again. Cover a baking sheet with a piece of greaseproof paper and place the pieces of cheese on it until they are needed.

Deep-fry the pieces of cheese for about 1-2 minutes and then place in the oven, pre-heated to 180ºC 9350ºF), Gas mark 4, for another 4-5 minutes. Do not leave the Brie in the fat or the oven for too long or it will run everywhere and look terrible! Serve in a pool of chilled watercress sauce – see below.

Watercress Sauce

Place all the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and process for 20-30 seconds until well incorporated. If you don’t have a food processor or blender you should mince all the herbs or chop them very finely, and mix well with the other ingredients.

To serve, spoon a puddle of sauce on to the middle of the plate, place a hot Brie portion on top and decorate with a sprig of watercress.

 

 

2 Comments