Christmas stockings

My major task this week is to find lovely little stocking fillers for my daughter’s stocking. I realise I have very few Emily-free days before she is home from university and will be as nosy as a five-year old about where presents might be hiding even though she is now 21!

Christmas stockings have been hung for ages but there’s no definitive history, it’s all folklore or tradition. Some people just have presents in the stocking – all supplied by Father Christmas. Some have a stocking, and then Father Christmas comes along and leaves larger presents under the tree. In our family’s case, we have stockings, and then all the presents are from real people rather than Father Christmas.

We always leave gifts for the reindeer and Santa – I don’t mean for a moment that Emily still believes – but I think we all just enjoy the little ritual of carrots for the reindeer, orange juice for Father Christmas as he is driving (Father Christmas was a little disappointed about that!) and a mince pie or chocolate brownie depending on what’s in the cake tin, to sustain him through his busiest night of the year.

When the girls were little, it was easy to have a limit of £4-5 for anything in the stocking, now it’s so much harder. Not only have prices gone up – I saw a £45 cashmere scarf advertised as a stocking filler today – but also adults are much harder to find things for than little girls! As tradition dictates, there’ll be a satsuma, some gold chocolate pennies and then a few other sweet treats, the obligatory amusing bubble bath and sadly this year I have stooped to a parrot key ring that swears – not a very good example but it is highly amusing.

So it’s full speed ahead for me – a personalised cupcake making apron (she loves to cook), some underwear, funny socks … thank goodness for the internet!

So, what are your stocking traditions?

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Patchwork baby bib

I have found myself semi-obsessed with new baby cards recently (can’t think why!) and this patchwork baby’s bib was made for me by Sylvie Ashton.

The main point of the card was to use the patchwork dies from our Signature range and very pretty it looks too. I persuaded Sylvie to make a quick template for you to use if you want to copy the idea. You will find that on our website just here

Cut out some card using the template as your guide. This will be the card blank. Cut another bib piece and decorate with diecut patchwork pieces from our Signature dies here.  

Glue some narrow lace around the edge of the main card blank and then add the patchwork bib layer. Finally decorate with a bow and a stamped or diecut sentiment.

Hope you enjoy playing!

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Photographs: to print, file or…?

With the arrival of my little granddaughter Grace – actually not so little now as she is gaining weight well and is nearly 10lbs – good for you Gracie! Anyway I digress, with a new addition to the family it made me look back and get out some photo albums from thirty years ago when my daughter Pippa was born.

There was a collective gasp when we compared newborn and first month photos and the similarity was incredible, no hiding whose daughter Grace is! I love family similarities (well the better ones) it feels comforting somehow to know the genes are working! But flicking through all the family history and remembering days out and birthdays etc, made me worry about my photographs taken today.

I love my computer, the internet and all things digital – to an extent. I know full well that Richard and I have lost some photographs from about seven or eight years ago, simply because a computer decided to die on us and we hadn’t been thorough enough to back things up. Our fault yes, but no way at all of ever recovering those lost moments.

Which is better I wonder, endless packets of negatives and print costs as you go somewhere to have them developed or to be at the mercy of your technical inefficiencies. We now have a sacred harddrive that we load with pictures and then put away somewhere safe till the next batch.

So what I am saying is – should we print out any really precious photos (possibly a real need for scrapbooking here!) as well as keeping them safe on a memory stick? What about the future in a hundred years time, will they laugh at our current technology and not be able to read it? I have photos from 1850 onwards all framed and hanging in my downstairs cloakroom, no problem with future generations being able to look at those.

What do you think?

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