Making a Christmas Wreath

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What a lovely day out! From the tutor, to the lunch to the finished article!

Alright, I admit it was a bit of a busman’s holiday, but my goodness I did enjoy myself on Wednesday! I went to a lunchtime course on making a Christmas wreath, held by Karen of 2020 Flowers who lives in Stokeinteignhead, near me. The course itself was held in a dear little café in Shaldon on the seafront, which was fun to go to in itself, and the food they served for lunch was amazing! Honey pumpkin soup and home made bread… it was just perfect.

Anyway, back to the wreath making! I know it all through and through, but it’s sometimes lovely to have a few hours to yourself where the phone won’t ring and the emails can’t get you! Karen is a serene, calm teacher and had all her ingredients so beautifully organised it was such fun to just play.

Using an Oasis ring, which you can get at some garden centres and obviously florist wholesalers, it is so, so simple to make a wreath yourself. A great tip from Karen was to not only soak the oasis in water (knew that) but to add flower food to the water (didn’t know that!) and I can see what a great idea it is.

I’d brought a whole selection of greenery from home as I felt the wreath would mean more to me if it was created using my own greenery and in the end, as I was a touch speedy, (sorry Karen!) I ended up making two wreaths – so my daughter Pippa is thrilled to bits to have a wreath Mummy made!

Another useful tip is that you can use unwanted pieces of Christmas tree – sometimes you trim some away from the base – or maybe you have a Leylandii hedge in the garden that could be carefully snipped at. I used ivy, Leylandii, rosemary and anything else that looked quite tough and long lasting.

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…and this was the second wreath I managed to squeeze in!

To decorate your wreath once the greenery is all pushed in (small lengths only, all the way round) you can use Christmas tree baubles, shells, berries, artificial or real flowers and, obviously, ribbons. As the Oasis is easy to push things in it’s fairly plain sailing until you get to baubles and shells, those are best hot glued onto pieces of bamboo skewer or just hot glued straight on the wreath.

It does make you feel good to have a decoration that you made yourself – I hope my family enjoy mine as much as I enjoyed the course!

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A winter wonderland…

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kjestenbasket2I love Christmas – I love the preparation, the decoration and the celebration! It is a wonderful opportunity for us crafters to create all sorts of fabulous things and I am always keen to see what new ideas or trends will appear each year alongside traditional decorations.

Everything Scandinavian is very ‘in’ at the moment, but it is such a magical winter wonderland, it is no surprise that they are the masters of cosy (yes, hygge again!) and of creating fabulous decorations from the plants and trees that thrive in such a cold landscape.

I follow a Facebook page that’s linked to Gardener’s World and someone whose posts regularly catch my eye is a lady called Kjerstin who lives in Norway. Her wooden house, built in 1919, looks like something out of a fairytale, and her garden is equally lovely, full of shape and colour even when the temperature has plummeted well below freezing.

kjerstincolourKjerstin has recently posted some great photos of the Christmas decorations and arrangements that she has created outside and she has very kindly said I can share them with you. The arrangements in urns and baskets are, Kjerstin said, simply stuck into soil, with branches the pushed well down.

I thought Kjerstin’s ideas might inspire us to come up with similar designs and, if you swap soil for oasis, many of her ideas would work well inside as well as out. I’d love to hear about your own Christmas decorating ideas, so please share!

Smiles, Joanna.

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A Christmas cracker!

You can’t have Christmas dinner without Christmas crackers – well, that’s my view anyway! We groan at the awfulness of the mottos, we laugh at the pointlessness of the ‘gift’ and we feel silly wearing the paper hats… but it is a tradition and we stick to it every year.

In moments of great industriousness, I have made my own crackers and spent ages thinking of appropriate gifts and jokes to go inside. They always go down well, but they take a lot of planning.

This will be my first Christmas without my parents, Diana and John, so this year will be tinged with sadness for all the family. But Mummy’s enthusiasm for a traditional family Christmas is firmly entrenched with all of us and I shall be filling stockings, dressing the table and fussing about the sprouts just as always.

I love decorating the table, I think it makes such an impact with pretty napkins, candles and, of course, a special Christmas table centrepiece. I have produced so many over the years and always find myself getting excited as I add the finishing touches. If you don’t have a large table, you can still make it look lovely with a table runner ­– cheap enough to buy even in supermarkets these days – or run up one of your own very simply. Table sprinkles are also great fun and really do add a touch of glitz and sparkle… but you’ll be hoovering them up for weeks afterwards!

Returning to the Christmas cracker… did you know they were invented in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Thomas Smith? Rather unromantically, he devised the Christmas cracker as a money-making idea when bonbon sales slumped. They originally contained love messages and a sweet. The enterprising Mr Smith then went on to the snapping strip to replicate the sound of a crackling log fire!

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House-Mouse sewing card

housemousesewingmontageThis card was made as a special tribute to Suzanne’s late mother. They shared so many sewing interests and as you turn the pages in this card, you see all the aspects of sewing that they enjoyed together. I think it’s a lovely tribute and shows that House-Mouse has multiple uses, not just to make us laugh!

The main ingredients apart from obviously the white pearlised card come from the following CDs:

House-Mouse Triple CD

House-Mouse Decoupage CD

House-Mouse Volume 1 Project Book
The pretty edges are all created with the set of 5 Signature Edger Dies – add a bit of ribbon and thread and you are away!

Thank you Suzanne for making this for us – I took it up to Create and Craft for one of my TV shows, but as is sometimes the case I just wasn’t able to show it as time whizzes past and before you know it the show is over and I often think – ‘Oh but I didn’t show..’ and ‘Oh what about…?’ so it’s lovely to give the card a blog all to itself!

 

 

 

 

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Anyone for skiing?

skiingThis is a really different card! It’s not perhaps suited to everyone you know but, if you have a skiing enthusiast among your friends and family, it would really hit the spot.

It really fascinates me how card making seems to fall into different groups. You have my favourite cards to make – flowery, lacy, pretty landscapes and gorgeous animals. These cards suit so many different people and they are excellent standbys to have in a drawer in case you need to quickly send or deliver a card you have forgotten, or only just been asked for.

The other group, however, is much more targeted. There’s no point in sending someone who is frightened of fish (me!) and hates being underwater (also me!) a card with a scuba diver on – but send one to my younger daughter Emily and she will be thrilled to little bits as scuba is a massive hobby for her.

This skiing card is going to thrill those that love their time on the slopes and a targeted card can give so much pleasure compared to a ‘safe’ choice, so it’s really worth making them and thinking about what that person might really like. The cocktail sticks make great poles to support the banner and the figure is cut using the Signature dies skier. Note the use of mirri card for the skis and poles!

Let’s hope you have lots of friends with similar tastes to mine as regards greeting cards – easy and beautiful please!

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