Heart-warming hygge

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I have to say, this is my idea of hygge! Hidden away in a corner of the lounge in a nice warm wooly jumper, a comfy chair and a book!

I keep seeing the word ‘hygge’ and wondering not only what it is, but also how on earth you say it!

Apparently, it is pronounced “hoo-ga” and is a Danish word that is a feeling that comes from taking genuine pleasure in making ordinary, every day things more meaningful, beautiful or special. I think as crafters, we can probably all identify with that sentiment!

Hygge is usually translated into English as ‘cosiness’. But it’s much more than that, apparently, and is an entire attitude to life that helps Denmark to vie with Switzerland and Iceland to be the world’s happiest country.

With up to 17 hours of darkness per day in the depths of winter, and average temperatures hovering around zero ºC, Danes spend a great deal of time indoors and, as a result, there’s greater focus on home entertaining. The idea is to relax and feel as at-home as possible, forgetting life’s worries. Sounds jolly good!

From what I have read, hygge seems to be about being kind to yourself – indulging, having a nice time, not punishing or denying yourself anything. All very useful come January when in the UK everyone’s on diets or manically exercising or abstaining from alcohol!

Apparently, the Danes are kinder to themselves and to each other. They don’t binge then purge and there’s not much yo-yo dieting in Denmark. No wonder they’re happier than we are back in dear old Blighty!

Certainly, everyone seems to be talking about hygge in the UK even though there isn’t an English word that means the same. It sounds a little like the English word ‘hug’, for which the Oxford English Dictionary lists no origins. You could argue that the effect of hygge and a hug is similar – comforting and secure. An obsolete meaning of hug is ‘to cherish oneself, to keep or make oneself snug”, according to the OED.

Hygge comes from a Norwegian word meaning ‘wellbeing’ and it first appeared in Danish writing in the 19th Century and has since evolved into the cultural idea known in Denmark today. Some older Danes feel that hygge isn’t what it used to be, as the stress on socialising has lessened. It’s now generally considered hyggeligt to watch TV alone or watching a DVD set, perhaps while eating crisps. Oh dear, a sign of the times even for the cosy Danes then…

And so, perhaps it’s safest to say that hygge was never meant to be translated – it was meant to be felt. I shall be attempting to feel some hygge this weekend – enjoy!

 

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The perfect hanging basket!

HydrangeaBasketI love hanging baskets and every year I promise we will have really splendid ones as you see in commercial places like pubs and shopping centres. I have discovered my problem – they all rely on an automated watering system, hence the beautiful and prolific blooms. I, however, have to rely on a Richard watering system, which although wonderful, amazingly hard working and… (what else should I say?) – just doesn’t seem to want to water the hanging baskets many, many times a day and do you blame him? He did try suggesting we had plastic flowers in the baskets this year – and I said I felt my Mother would send down a bolt of lightning onto him if he did that!

This card shows one of many ways to use our brilliant Signature hanging basket die, together with the Signature Busy Lizzie die and the Signature Sabrina Lace Border. The embossing folder is called Tied Together and must, I am sure, have been one of the best-selling embossing folders of all time.

Layer some embossed white card over a gentle mustard or mid-green card. Layer a smaller panel of white card with the same green and some pink. Assemble the card with the embossed layer, then some Sabrina Lace, then the smaller panel. Now put the hanging basket in place with the filling/soil made by cutting out some beige card or white card coloured with pens.

Now cut lots of the Busy Lizzy flowers and colour those with pens too, you could cut them out of pastel card if you hate using pens. Attach the hanging basket to the smaller panel using glue gel to raise the basket slightly. Now arrange your flowers and leaves as shown.

As an important embellishment, there is a self-adhesive pearl on every visible junction of the embossed card and a little dot of glitter in the centre of the flowers. Add the chains from the die and a ribbon bow and you’re all set!

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It’s a tiring business…

Tablet“Goodness, I am tired!” I hear myself and my friends say this on a regular basis. While I tend to laugh and put it down to advancing years, today’s world is actually much busier than it used to be with technology sneakily eating into our leisure time making us more stressed and tired. Many of the things we think are pick me ups, or relaxers actually have the reverse effect! But don’t despair… there are all sort goods of small things we can do to help improve our energy levels.

TVs and tablets
I don’t think anyone will be surprised by this appearing at the top of the list as it’s had a lot of publicity of late. Both TVs and tablets give off blue wavelengths that suppress your brain’s production of melatonin (the chemical that makes you feel tired and helps you fall asleep), so you’re more likely to have shorter, disrupted sleep, causing you to be tired the next day. I, for one, am very naughty about putting my iPad down at bedtime – grr!

TiredMessySort it out
A messy unorganised environment means you expend mental energy on stress, which increases your exhaustion. I know when I have had a really good sort out in my craft room and got everything properly ordered and stored, I feel so much happier and my mind less muddled.

The coffee kick

Even though many people find the kick of coffee essential in the mornings, come the afternoon or evening it might be the reason you’re nodding off. While caffeine is a stimulant and increases your energy, the effect wears off over time and leaves you feeling worse later.

TiredCoffeeCheers – not!
While a nightcap might help you fall asleep faster, the quality of sleep you’ll get after a glass of red wine is not good. You can expect a restless night and to wake up more often, leaving you tired the next day.

Let in the light
A study of workers with offices with windows, verses those without, found that people who enjoyed natural light all day long on average slept 46 minutes more at night. The same goes for your home – the more natural light you have will help you sleep better at night and feel more rested the next day.

Feeling blue…
This is a bit of an odd one, but a study by Travelodge (the motel people) investigated bedroom colours in 2,000 homes and found that blue walls help slow down your heart rate, reduce your blood pressure, and make you feel sleepy. So while this is great news in your bedroom, it isn’t ideal anywhere else in your house!

Naughty snacks!
Foods loaded with simple carbs and sugars result in frequent blood sugar spikes, followed by sharp drops that will make you feel tired over time. This is something I can certainly identify with and I am feeling a great deal better following my healthy eating and veg growing regime! I’m not saying I never hanker after a handful of crisps, but…!

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Vintage Containers

CoffeeBeanSome call it clutter, hoarding or just plain rubbish. However, I love my collection of ‘useful’ pots. I save and buy quite randomly – I might see a basket in a charity shop, or a vase in a local gift shop or florist. But my squirreled away treasures also include things like Camembert boxes (come on, you can cover them or just use them as a ‘useful pot’) and, when I have seedlings in mind, even the yogurt pots are not immune to being well washed and stored away in a cupboard.

As a crafter I have worrying tendencies to clutter my life with things that will ‘come in useful’. But they bring me a lot of pleasure and when you find a brilliant use for something you had hidden away, it can feel really rewarding. If I have to defend myself I will play the eco card and talk loudly about recycling but …. the truth is I was obviously a hamster in a previous life and just like storing all sorts of goodies!

On the desk that I use for crafting I have several recycled items used for storage. I adore Jo Malone perfume and was given a set of their smellies for Christmas and the box – well, I was almost as thrilled with that as with the perfume! So that has all my ‘too small not to get lost’ in a drawer oddments. Then I have an old enamel pot that my Mum decorated with barge art when we were both going through ‘a phase’! That sorts my scissors and Japanese screw punches. I also have a pretty little handmade box that a crafter called Alice gave me one NEC that I treasure and also use for my stash of cocktail sticks.

So I understand only too well when my little toddler granddaughter holds tightly onto the box of an expensive toy and disappears off to play with that leaving whatever the present was languishing on the floor! Maybe my children can blame that on her Granny as an inherited trait!

This image caught my eye as I love the collection of vintage bits and pieces filled with flowers, I may even try and recreate something like it one day – if I do I’ll post it here on the blog!

Lily of the Valley card

Ingredients

Method

  1. Start by trimming some of the paler hessian backing paper to 7 ¾”, then the darker coffee sack paper to 7 ½”. Layer these onto the card with double sided tape.
  2. Cut out the main image from the cardmaking sheet. Also cut the decoupage pieces.
  3. Attach the image to the card using tape and then build the decoupage with Pinflair glue gel.
  4. Make the embellishment of lilies of the valley by cutting the die multiple times in soft green, cream and white. Finish the bunch with a bow tied in bakers twine.
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Easy salmon & pinto bean pâté

Here are a couple of recipes that have proved useful for me when I have friends or family round for a meal. As I have mentioned before I am currently dieting with Slimming World and it’s certainly helping me come up with family-friendly alternatives to the higher calorie, more traditional recipes that I have been used to.

Both recipes could be thinned down with more liquid if you wanted to turn them into dips instead of pâtés – depends what you want them for really!

EasyPatesSalmon, lemon and parsley pâté
Here I used fresh salmon that I cooked in the microwave (only takes 2 or 3 minutes) – but you could use tinned salmon or bought ready cooked salmon.

  • 200g salmon
  • 200g quark (or light Philadelphia, or fromage frais)
  • Handful of fresh parsley
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • Few tablespoons water
  • Salt and pepper
  • Teaspoon (or more) Waitrose crushed chilli (a cooks ingredient in a jar, but other brands would be fine)

Method

  1. Make sure the salmon has no skin or bones – then chuck (technical term) all the ingredients into a food processor and whizz until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning to your liking – if it seems too solid then add more water (tablespoon at a time and whizz).
  2. If you don’t have a food processor then a stick blender would work or even just forking it all together.
  3. Serve with toast, or brown bread and butter or as a dip (add more water) with crudities.

Pinto bean, chickpea and sweet chilli pâté
This recipe is ideal for any vegetarians you may have to feed, or just for meat eaters that love chilli!

  • 1 tin pinto beans, drained
  • 1 tin chickpeas, drained
  • 3 cloves garlic (or less if you aren’t a garlic fan)
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • Salt and pepper
  • Few tablespoons of water
  • Blue Dragon light sweet chilli sauce
  • Waitrose cook’s ingredient crushed chilli (or any other brand)

Method

  1. Drain beans well (I usually rinse them quickly in the sieve) and then put all the ingredients into a food processor except the last two. Whizz until smooth – then decide how much chilli sauce and chillis you want to use – I would suggest one or two teaspoons of the chillis and then several tablespoons of the sweet chilli sauce.
  2. Whizz again and check the taste – alter the seasoning and if necessary add a little more water.
  3. Again this could be thinned with more water to make a dip with crudites – or served as a pâté with warm rolls or toast.

 

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