A Murderous Success!

Well, what can I say other than ‘thank you’? My partner in crime writing, Julia, and I have been thrilled by the response to our latest novel, ‘A Fowl Murder’. It has sold incredibly well and the early reviews have all been very kind.

We have, tentatively, started thinking about a fourth novel in the series, set in the winter time. However, we both lead fairly hectic lives and have all sorts of other projects ‘on the go’, so we need to sit down and discuss it further…

Of course, the talking and the plotting is the fun bit! We both enjoy creating new characters and thinking up dastardly ends for some poor unsuspecting soul or other. Writing as a team has distinct advantages – egging each other on when the going gets tough, but has disadvantages too – as when continuity gets scrambled and characters have been known to change name or completely vanish!

Going over and over your work and editing and correcting can be a hard slog and cups of tea tend to mysteriously change into glasses of wine every now and then… and then of course, there’s the need for all the cake baking and recipe testing to ensure authenticity! It can be a tough job…

There’s also the fear of arrest. Julia was sitting in a pub garden discussing a potential plot idea with a friend and said: “I really don’t know if we could get away with stabbing him. It’s too obvious, perhaps poison might be better?” At which point, her friend pointed out that a passing waiter has turned pale and has now having an urgent whispered discussion with a colleague. A flurry of embarrassed explanation followed, and she was able to leave after her drink with nothing more than suspicious glances, and not in handcuffs.

I have been known to wander around garden centres asking about the poisonous potential of plants and shrubs. I may even have used my Granddaughter, Grace, as the reason for my concern, disgraceful!

And so, dear readers, if you ever hear of two middle aged women from Devon being held in custody, you will come and explain, won’t you…?

 

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A Fowl Murder

 At last – ‘A Fowl Murder’ – book three in the Swaddlecombe series, is being published next weekend! Victoria and Albert are back and you can catch up on their latest adventures.

To whet your appetite, here’s the synopsis from the book jacket:

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As her first summer in rural Devon draws to a close, Victoria West feels comfortably settled and her relationship with farmer Albert Moreton is jogging along nicely… but then death comes a–calling.

A work colleague from Victoria’s ‘old’ life in London appears on the scene and life starts to get complicated. An article on breeding chickens somehow draws Victoria and Albert into a web of jealousy, lies and murder. There’s a catastrophe over the canapés and plenty more shocks in store in the third Swaddlecombe adventure.

As ever, the locals add plenty of colour to this the cosy British murder mystery. Will pub landlord Roger ever be able to face a cup of coffee again? Can Victoria keep clear of the clutches of sleazy Morris Podger and will Albert manage to bake a gluten-free cake?

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Thank you all so much for your patience, support and kind words. A Fowl Murder has, for all sorts of reasons, taken much longer to publish than we had hoped. My partner in crime writing, Julia, and myself hope that it brings you suspense and laughter in equal amounts… and that you think it has been worth the wait!

The paperback will be available on my website and on Kindle very shortly and I will let you all have the link as soon as it is ready!

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Growing up fast…

My partner in crime writing, Julia, got a new puppy back in March last year and we introduced you to her the following month – Moss, a Wirehaired German Pointer. Well, Moss is now one year old and has grown up into quite a character! She has her own Facebook page and also ‘writes’ reviews for a local business ‘Dartmoor Accommodation’ about dog-friendly places to visit. We thought we’d let her bring you up to date with her life so far…

Hello! I am Moss, the Dartmoor Dog Blogger. I have grown up a lot since you last saw me and I no longer look like a Spaniel. My lovely wirehaired coat has grown, and I am generally regarded as rather gorgeous with a fine moustache and beard. I also have pale greeny gold eyes which, I am told, are one of my best features.

I am lucky (so she keeps telling me) as I live on a farm on Dartmoor so I get lots of nice walks by the river, on the moor or just around the fields on the farm. I am especially fond of puddles, and I like to lie in them, but I am not a very good swimmer yet, I am still learning. I enjoy being in the waves in the sea when we go on holiday and I did swim a bit in Cornwall last summer.

A few of my favourite things! Top to bottom: The watering can incident, puddle bathing, mulching, erm… cushion chewing, relaxing on the sofa.I am, apparently, quite naughty and not very obedient (whatever that is!) and I do like a good chew. I have chewed all sorts of things – from my bed, to the aerial cable and part of a watering can, to name but a few. Different things have different textures and I like to try them out.

I have also tried different types of food such as raw spaghetti and garlic (euw!). Every day, as well as my proper food, I have natural yogurt, raw carrots and some pumpkin seeds – which are very yummy and I would like to eat them all the time. I am a very healthy dog! I also like to recycle things, like paper and cardboard and chew them up ready for the bin men. I am also good at mulching in the garden, chewing everything up and then spreading it around and sometimes bringing it into the house… which she doesn’t appreciate.

Sometimes, we go and visit nice places like hotels or pubs where they welcome dogs, some have water bowls and dog biscuits and special towels for me to wipe my feet on. I have to sit and watch her chomp her way through free meals and afternoon tea and I get given titbits. She then writes about it and I get even more famous! I think she probably get a better deal out of it than I do, but I do get to meet lots of new people, who are always very nice to me.

All in all, it’s not a bad life. I get to sleep a lot and relax on the sofa, it is quite tiring being famous and it is hard work training her to do what I want, but I am getting there… I reckon she’ll be well-trained by the end of this year.

Licks, Moss.

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Danger’s Last Resort

 Finally, here it is! Launching in the next week or so, the first of my solo novels entitled ‘Danger’s Last Resort’. I will send out more details as soon as we have the paperbacks here and the Kindle version is listed on Amazon – but I thought you might like to read a sneak preview. You can see the cover finally making it through the printing process here and I can’t wait to be sent the finished book!

I have put my heart and soul into writing this book and it has acted as a wonderful escape from my complicated family life at the moment, so I hope you will all find it as uplifting to read as I did to write.

The story…
Stuck in a junior manager’s job in a dreary English hotel, Rose dreams of exotic travel. Then, astonishingly, that dream comes true when she inherits property right on the beach in tropical Barbados.

It’s not the cosy seashore cottage she expects but a once grandly genteel destination where Princess Margaret used to stay – but it’s now threadbare and overgrown. Still, the hotel oozes charm and possibility. Can Rose see her future here, recreating the dignified, welcoming oasis it used to be?

Then the death threats start and both Rose and her family are in danger. Unsettling things, threatening things. Barbados turns out to be the opposite of paradise. Its gorgeous turquoise waters are infested with particularly treacherous sharks: cutthroat people who want Rose’s beachfront property and will stop at nothing to get it!

Well, I hope that whets your appetites – oh, and there’s a little romance thrown in along the way! Happy reading…

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Curiouser and curiouser – ‘Alice’ appeal lives on 150 years after publication

John Tenniel’s original AliceThe Mad Hatter, The White Rabbit and a little girl called Alice – three of the many fantastical characters created by Lewis Carroll in his 1865 masterpiece ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’, characters loved by generation after generation of children the world over. 2015 is the 150th anniversary of its publication and there are Alice in Wonderland events happening all over the place and a whole new generation is being introduced to the little girl who fell down a rabbit hole and tumbled into another world.

I adored reading Alice in Wonderland as a child. I spent quite a lot time looking for a rabbit hole large enough to fall down because I was convinced I’d have the same adventures if I did and I longed to meet the White Rabbit and the Cheshire Cat. The book manages that magical mix of humour, fantasy and a little bit of fear – would the Queen of Hearts cut off your head? Would you be trapped forever always too big, or too small, to escape from the endless passage and through one of the enticing doors?

Little Alice Liddell was the real-life Alice who inspired Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll was his pen name), to write the novel when she asked him to tell her a story on a boating trip down the Thames in Oxford. Even when I have re-read it as an adult, I have found it entrancing and dream-like. There are so many character and phrases that crop up in modern culture and many plays and films and other books have been made about it or been inspired by it.

The real ‘Alice’, Alice Liddell.Charles Dodgson was an English writer, mathematician, Anglican deacon and photographer. After Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, he wrote Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poems Jabberwocky and The Hunting of the Snark both wonderful examples of fantastic nonsense!

But is it really a children’s book? The story plays with logic making it as popular with adults as with children. It is one of the best examples of the literary ‘nonsense’ genre popular in the Victorian era, with one of the other most famous ‘nonsense’ writers being Edward Lear, he of ‘Owl and the Pussycat’ fame! Goodness, can you imagine being at a literary lunch with those two authors!

I often find myself thinking of particular ‘Alice’ phrases – I think one of two have even slipped into my own books! Here are a few of my favourites:

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”

“If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.”

“Why is a raven like a writing desk?”

One of Arthur Rackham’s Art Nouveau illustrationsOne of the things I loved most about Alice in Wonderland was the illustrations. The version I had featured the beautiful Art Nouveau images created by Arthur Rackham, but the original book featured the work of John Tenniel. Both of their illustrations are stunning and so very ‘of the era’.

And what of the book when it was first published 150 years ago? The entire print run sold out quickly – Alice was a publishing sensation, beloved by children and adults alike. Among its first avid readers were Queen Victoria and the young Oscar Wilde. The book has never been out of print and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into at least 174 languages.

Couriouser and curiouser,” as Alice would have said!

Did you read it as a child, or an adult? Did you like it? Which was your favourite character? I think I’ve got to choose the White Rabbit!

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