Exciting new Thomas Kinkade pads!

There are four separate hours of me on TV later this week – 25th and 26th January – so I thought you might like a sneak preview of one of the new products!

I have created several new and exciting products for the shows and we will also be celebrating the fact that this is my 15th anniversary with the channel. Oh my, how time flies!

This card is taken from one of the two new Thomas Kinkade pads that feature on the shows. The main difference is that apart from the usual fab toppers and borders, decoupage and embellishments, we have also included a selection of new backing papers, some gorgeous frames to take the pictures and loads of sentiment boxes.

Everything co-ordinates so you have some lovely choices to make cards. I will be doing plenty of demonstrations on the shows including many Thomas Kinkade ideas and samples.

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Jane Shasky vibrant nasturtium card

I am rather fond of nasturtiums. Partly because they grow so easily and fight on regardless of how crummy the soil is… but also because their bright colouring attracts my little granddaughter and she keeps them regularly watered for me!

This image is from one of our Jane Shasky pads called Garden Herbs and the backing paper comes from Jane’s CD – From the Heart of the Garden. I know I say it often, but it is one of those really useful CDs you will use over and over again for many different projects. The papers are fab and so are the images.

The Garden Herbs card making pad has the same really useful selection of pictures on it. I find Jane’s work so easy to use and turn to it frequently. The die is from our Signature die range, Crocus SD470. It has been cut out on green card a couple of times and then a third time with white card and the flowers coloured and snipped off to paper piece the finished embellishment.

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Hand made soap – good clean fun!

Hand making anything is always very rewarding – and making your own soap is no exception. Not only can you create your own perfect scent combo, but you get to make a mess and play with lovely gooey stuff before turning out some beautiful end products! Not just a great treat for you, but also ideal gifts for friends and family – what’s not to love?

When she’s not looking after the company’s bookkeeping, caring for her young children or baking cakes… my bookkeeper Jo Bridgeman likes to turn her hand to different crafts. Recently, she’s been experimenting with making her own soaps and, in true Jo B style, has turned out some super results! She kindly brought in some of her fragrant bath bombs and soaps and let me have the details so you could all have a try. It is really quite a straightforward process and, once you’ve made an initial investment in some soap moulds, the world’s your lather! 

Cedar Wood & Honey soap

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 3/4 cup oats
  • Cedar wood essential oil

Method:

  1. Cut Melt and Pour Soap Base into cubes and add to a microwaveable bowl. Microwave on high for 30 seconds. Then microwave at 10 second increments, stirring in between, until melted.
  2. Mix in oats. Pour into a silicone soap mould.
  3. Drizzle honey into each soap mould and swirl it around with the end of a spoon – make sure you mix it in well or you’ll get a sticky mess! Let the mixture set for 40 minutes to 1 hour.
  4. Remove from soap mould by turning the mould upside down and gently pushing on the back of each soap.

Rose Bathbomb

Making your own bath bombs is simple and uses safe ingredients, so it is a fun thing to work on with young children. Just remember that citric acid will sting if it gets into cuts or scratches and will also be very irritating to the eyes.

Ingredients:

  • 300g bicarbonate of soda
  • 100g citric acid
  • 10ml Rose essential oil
  • Dried rose petals
  • Water

Method:

  1. Measure out the bicarbonate of soda and the citric acid into a mixing bowl, sieving if necessary and thoroughly mix together. Stir in a few rose petals.
  2. Add the essential oil to the mixture, mix in quickly and thoroughly.
  3. Now, working the mixture all the time, spray a little water on with a hand sprayer. Mix continuously to avoid it fizzing-up in the bowl and only add enough water for the mixture to hold together when lightly squeezed in your hand. It should JUST hold together and not be too damp.
  4. Once this point is reached you need to work quickly to compress the mixture into your moulds. Jo has used a rose-shaped mould to compliment the rose scent.
  5. As a finishing touch, sprinkle dried rose petals over the bath bombs.

You could use all kinds of moulds including something simple like ice-cube trays or small yoghurt pots, silicone baking moulds, cup cakes etc. Have fun!

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Roses and lace

A happy new year to you and I do hope it has got of to a positive start! This card is just gorgeous combining two of my favourite things – roses and lace. It’s an 8” x 8” base so makes a really good impact. The main artwork is an image from Marjolein Bastin, whose work is so pretty, her cardmaking pads are just full of pages that make you want to start on a card!

This particular image is from the Marjolein Bastin Summer pad and is one of my many favourites. It has been used with two Signature dies, Jessica lace border and the Climbing Rose. I would say they are amongst my most heavily used dies – especially the rose… not that I use flowers a lot! It does make a stunning card to send someone though and although I laugh about my love of flowers and tendency to add them to everything, they are a very beautiful embellishment!

Two borders have been used here, so you need to grab the second border from the second sheet of this pink rose design in the pad. There are plenty of other cards that you can do with the main images and other bits on the second sheet, so it’s not wasted. That’s the joy of having two sheets the same of each of the twelve designs.

The climbing rose die has been die cut in white and coloured. There are two schools of thought on this. Some people swear by cutting the die a few times in the required colours and paper piecing but I think colouring can be quicker and easier. Unless of course you don’t like colouring much and there are plenty of those that don’t! The Jessica lace has been cut in a white pearl effect card.

Finally to recap on the three glues that I use constantly, and all three were needed for this card. Pinflair glue gel is used to create the decoupage and attach the rose embellishments. The backing paper and little square images are all stuck down with double sided tape and then the centrepiece is attached with foam tape.

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Poppies, butterflies and lace

Poppies, butterflies and lace, such a pretty combination! This is a relatively quick and easy card and I love the finished effect. I have a pack of white lace edged hankies that my Mum thought would be useful for smarter occasions (she was never happy with the small packet of tissues solution). I am afraid I never really used them and they just sat in my cupboard, so I transferred them to my craft room in case I got inspiration.

You never know I might have fancied embroidering my initials or screen printing…. ok, stop being silly, you ended up cutting them up for card making – much more realistic!

So, to make this pretty background, I folded the square hanky into four and then across that quarter to make a pointed shape as you would with an icing bag. I cut across the plain cotton in the centre to remove the bulk and was left with a handkerchief with a massive hole in the middle.

Using red liner tape as it is that much stronger than double sided, I added at least two strips to each edge. Then gently press and shape the handkerchief around, the red liner tape will let you reposition a bit and make it fit the square card. Add more pleats if it’s a bit big.

The main image comes from the Jane Shasky poppies pad. I layered the topper up on blue and green card to make it nice and study and then using tons of glue gel placed it over the fabric. Press gently and then leave to dry overnight.

Finishing touches were extra butterflies provided on the sheet.

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