Lisa Audit artwork

happyanniversaryroseIf you haven’t had a look at our Lisa Audit Cardmaking pads yet… you should! Her work is so pretty, contemporary and useful for, oh, so many cards. They are lovely.

The nice thing about our paper pads is that everything you need to get you started on a card is there and then you can add embellishments or backing papers as you desire.

With this card, several Signatures dies have been used – our rose tea set and our Harriet Lace Edger down the right-hand side.

To complement the teapot there’s a fun little tea bag and string bow, and the bunting in the top right is one of our Signature shapes.

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A card to welcome the New Year

newyearroseI know I go on and on about the Heart of the Garden CD featuring Jane Shasky’s work, but it really is lovely. I am a huge fan and can quite happily spend an hour or two just browsing the pictures, enjoying the images while I ponder what to print.

All the components on this card come from the CD – and that’s part of the joy of CDs – there’s so much to choose from! Here we’ve got lovely sentimental words for the New Year and some fun decoupage and flowers. The centre of the flowers has been highlighted with some crystal lacquer.

We all think of sending Christmas cards but not always a New Year card – I rather like the idea of a card at New Year – life can seem a bit flat after Christmas Day and Boxing Day guests have left!

Wishing you all a happy and peaceful 2017! Smiles, Joanna.

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Making a Christmas Wreath

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What a lovely day out! From the tutor, to the lunch to the finished article!

Alright, I admit it was a bit of a busman’s holiday, but my goodness I did enjoy myself on Wednesday! I went to a lunchtime course on making a Christmas wreath, held by Karen of 2020 Flowers who lives in Stokeinteignhead, near me. The course itself was held in a dear little café in Shaldon on the seafront, which was fun to go to in itself, and the food they served for lunch was amazing! Honey pumpkin soup and home made bread… it was just perfect.

Anyway, back to the wreath making! I know it all through and through, but it’s sometimes lovely to have a few hours to yourself where the phone won’t ring and the emails can’t get you! Karen is a serene, calm teacher and had all her ingredients so beautifully organised it was such fun to just play.

Using an Oasis ring, which you can get at some garden centres and obviously florist wholesalers, it is so, so simple to make a wreath yourself. A great tip from Karen was to not only soak the oasis in water (knew that) but to add flower food to the water (didn’t know that!) and I can see what a great idea it is.

I’d brought a whole selection of greenery from home as I felt the wreath would mean more to me if it was created using my own greenery and in the end, as I was a touch speedy, (sorry Karen!) I ended up making two wreaths – so my daughter Pippa is thrilled to bits to have a wreath Mummy made!

Another useful tip is that you can use unwanted pieces of Christmas tree – sometimes you trim some away from the base – or maybe you have a Leylandii hedge in the garden that could be carefully snipped at. I used ivy, Leylandii, rosemary and anything else that looked quite tough and long lasting.

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…and this was the second wreath I managed to squeeze in!

To decorate your wreath once the greenery is all pushed in (small lengths only, all the way round) you can use Christmas tree baubles, shells, berries, artificial or real flowers and, obviously, ribbons. As the Oasis is easy to push things in it’s fairly plain sailing until you get to baubles and shells, those are best hot glued onto pieces of bamboo skewer or just hot glued straight on the wreath.

It does make you feel good to have a decoration that you made yourself – I hope my family enjoy mine as much as I enjoyed the course!

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A Christmas cracker!

You can’t have Christmas dinner without Christmas crackers – well, that’s my view anyway! We groan at the awfulness of the mottos, we laugh at the pointlessness of the ‘gift’ and we feel silly wearing the paper hats… but it is a tradition and we stick to it every year.

In moments of great industriousness, I have made my own crackers and spent ages thinking of appropriate gifts and jokes to go inside. They always go down well, but they take a lot of planning.

This will be my first Christmas without my parents, Diana and John, so this year will be tinged with sadness for all the family. But Mummy’s enthusiasm for a traditional family Christmas is firmly entrenched with all of us and I shall be filling stockings, dressing the table and fussing about the sprouts just as always.

I love decorating the table, I think it makes such an impact with pretty napkins, candles and, of course, a special Christmas table centrepiece. I have produced so many over the years and always find myself getting excited as I add the finishing touches. If you don’t have a large table, you can still make it look lovely with a table runner ­– cheap enough to buy even in supermarkets these days – or run up one of your own very simply. Table sprinkles are also great fun and really do add a touch of glitz and sparkle… but you’ll be hoovering them up for weeks afterwards!

Returning to the Christmas cracker… did you know they were invented in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Thomas Smith? Rather unromantically, he devised the Christmas cracker as a money-making idea when bonbon sales slumped. They originally contained love messages and a sweet. The enterprising Mr Smith then went on to the snapping strip to replicate the sound of a crackling log fire!

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Beautiful Pansies

pansiesEveryone loves pansies (don’t they?) and I am sure this card will go down a storm with so many people. I am just pondering planting a batch of winter pansies in a hollow cavity wall that surrounds my patio. It has geraniums in it all summer – I just hesitate about how much 40ft worth of pansy plants might cost from the garden centre! My precious geraniums have been upgraded to pots in a nice warm summerhouse to help them last through the winter and smile again come the spring – and save a small fortune in buying new plants. Hmmm, maybe I should invest in a greenhouse…

This image is from one of my favourite CDs “One Summer’s Day” – a real must have for your collection, it’s one of a very small bundle that I keep out on my desk at all times as I use it so often. The pansy die is from the Signature Garden Flowers set and the border is the Signature Diana Lace Ribbon. All easy to use and in the case of the pansies, fun to colour.

The most effective thing on the card is the quick layer of crystal lacquer (or glossy accents or whatever you have) on the ceramic pot that holds the pansies. It really catches the eye and adds some important texture.

Right, I shall go back to my thinking … should I buy loads of pansy plants – go without and wait for spring – or buy a few and have a meagre filling in the wall?

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