Scrubbing up well!

When thinking about beauty treatments and pampering, we often tend to think about our faces and neglect our poor old bodies.

A very effective way of making your body smoother and softer and altogether nicer to look at, is to treat them with a scrub, followed by a soothing cream and there are lots of ways of doing this using natural products. Here are a couple of ideas for you to try.

Coconut scrub – Suitable for any skin type

You will need:

  • 150ml dessicated coconut
  • 150ml ground almond
  • 150ml oatmeal
  • 45ml liquid honey
  • Rosewater, as needed

This scrub makes skin lovely and soft. Mix the dry ingredients and add the honey. Pour in as much rosewater as necessary to make a smooth paste. You can use it anywhere on your body. Simply rub it in and leave for 20 minutes. Then, with strong circular strokes, rub off with a flannel – you will be positively glowing!

Marigold mask – This is ideal for backs!

You will need:

  • 23ml (1½ tablespoons) of marigold tea (see below)
  • 1 tablespoon of clay
  • 10ml (3 teaspoons) glycerine

This an excellent way of making your upper back look beautiful in summer dresses and swimming costumes!

Marigolds purify the skin and blood circulation is invigorated by the massage that automatically happens when you remove the mask.

Make an infusion of the marigold petals in 300ml of boiling water. Leave it to stew for one hour. Measure out the required amount and stir in the other ingredients. If needed, add some more marigold tea to get a good consistency, then rub your back with it and leave for 20 minutes to work its magic on your skin as you relax, lying on your stomach. Remove the mask with strong circular strokes with a flannel. It might be easier (and rather more relaxing!) if you ask someone else to do this for you!

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Visiting Amish country…

We have just returned from America – primarily to attend the CHA craft/trade show but also to take a few days break. This time we decided to do a road trip with our friends Randy and Cheryl from Michigan and we headed out to Amish country in Indiana.

I am fascinated by the Amish, I admire their courage in trying to live yesterday’s life in today’s world and their tenacity to stand out and be different. Having said that I won’t be turning Amish any time soon as I love my computer, phone, electricity and female emancipation! I love being able to get into my mini and zoom off whenever and wherever I like, picturesque though these horse and buggies are.

The Amish people are gentle and friendly towards tourists and I was even able to have dinner one day in an Amish home and spend a lot of time exploring the real meaning of being Amish. One of the huge highlights for me was mooching around in Amish quilt stores and craft shops… oh their quilting! Some even extend their quilting to the garden and you can see here a patchwork piece made from flowers – some lovely ideas and inspiration to be found.

The other obvious passion the Amish have is home baking – mmm, the pies and the cookies, the sweets and the home made bread – so good for the diet Joanna (ok not..) A frequent item on their menu is home made bread spread with a peanut butter, marshmallow and honey mix… oo-err low calorie or what!

I came home with a lot of interesting spice mixes and my mind buzzing with ideas for recipes and quilting themes… and a really different view of how life can be lived.

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Peaches and Cream

I just love this rubber stamp – in fact I love the whole range of fruity/kitchen/recipe stamps we have. This particular stamp is from a sheet called Spiced Peaches and has a lovely recipe included as well.

The design idea behind this card is such an easy one for you to have a go with – just using a die cut shape – stamp the image and colour (go Promarkers!) and then soften the edges with some of the Old Paper or other soft beige Distress Ink pads.

While we are talking Distress Ink pads – many of you will have tried to use them with the Inkessentials Blending Tool – which is a good piece of kit, but I have to say I have found the Inkylicious Duster brushes so much easier. The brushes come in a set of three and they have made me a lot keener to use the Distress Inks around the edge of my cards and I agree this can add a lovely texture and effect. Now I feel happy that I can achieve it with no blips I am doing it so much more often!

Soft, pretty cards are always well received, as I am sure this one would be… of course if you were feeling really generous you could make a jar of spiced peaches as a gift to go with the car… or not!

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Busy bees

Spending so much time with flowers over the years, I’m a great respecter of bees. When you’re in your garden, it’s rare not to hear their gentle drone. I would never keep bees and respect them though I do… no way could I have ‘pet’ bees!

The big, slow moving bumble bee doesn’t produce much honey but it is an important pollinator. The smaller honey bee not only pollinates but also toils away to produce honey from the pollen it collects.

I knew bees were vital, but I was surprised when I read that one in three mouthfuls of the food we eat is dependent on pollination – so worrying when we are told that honeybee numbers have fallen by up to 30% in recent years

Honey, and the bees that create it, are both pretty amazing! Honeybees are the only insects to produce food for humans and honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life, including enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and water.

And wow, do ‘worker’ honey bees deserve their name! The average worker bee produces about one twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in her lifetime. She visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip… and as you will have gathered it is the female of the species that does all the work!

Larger than the worker bees, the male honey bees (also called drones), have no stinger and do no work at all. All they do is mate. Now there’s a surprise!! (Sorry all you guys that read the blog……..)

 

 

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Elderflower Delight

Goodness me – have we got a delicious treat for you this week! Writing pal and foraging guru Julia Horton-Powdrill has come up with this absolutely gorgeous reciped for ElderFlower Delight. What a lovely change from the usual Turkish variety and another great use for wonderful edlerflower. Thank you Julia!

Elderflower Delight

You will need: 

  • 25g leaf gelatine
  • 25 heads of elderflowers
  • 700g granulated sugar
  • 400ml water
  • 130g cornflour
  • 30g icing sugar
  • Juice of two lemons 

Soak the gelatine in a shallow dish of cold water to soften. Strip the blossom from the stems and tie loosely in a piece of muslin leaving one piece of string long.

Put granulated sugar, lemon juice and 300ml water in a heavy-based saucepan, heat gently until sugar is dissolved, then leave to cool.

Mix 100g of the cornflour with the remaining 100ml water until smooth, then stir into lemon/sugar syrup. Return the saucepan to a low heat. Squeeze gelatine to remove excess water, then add to mixture. Whisk until dissolved.

Bring mixture very slowly to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring almost continuously to prevent the mixture sticking. Suspend the muslin bag in the mixture and simmer, still stirring, for a further 15 minutes. Give muslin bag an occasional squeeze with back of spoon to release Elderflower fragrance. The mixture will gradually clarify and become extremely gloopy. When ready, leave to cool for 10 minutes.

Mix remaining 30g cornflour with icing sugar. Line a shallow baking tin, about 20cm square, with baking parchment and dust with a heaped tablespoonful of the icing sugar and cornflour mixture. Remove the muslin bag from the gloopy mixture, then pour it into baking tin and place in a cool place (not the fridge) to set.

Refrigerate for a few hours until it becomes rubbery. Cut the Elderflower Delight into cubes with a knife or scissors and dust with the remaining icing sugar and cornflour. Enjoy!

To see more of Julia’s wonderful recipes and foraging tips, go to: www.facebook.com/WildAboutPembrokeshire

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