Clotted cream at Christmas!

clottedsprouts

Have you ever seen sprouts look so delicious?

I came across a sweet little free booklet this week entitled ‘Clotted Christmas Recipes’. Aha, I thought, this looks interesting! I think most of us tend to think of clotted cream as a summertime treat for afternoon tea in the garden, served with a scone and homemade jam. This little booklet, and then a trip to Trewithen Dairy’s website soon made me rethink that view!

Their website has lots of delicious recipes and the one that caught my eye was for… wait for it… sprouts! How seasonal is that? Do have a look at their other recipes, there are some lovely ones… and it is a Westcountry product, so I am all in favour!

We love sprouts. We love clotted cream… so why not put them together? The clotted cream will coat the sprouts with a rich glaze while the crispy bacon seasons them with a lovely umami quality. You can prepare your sprouts traditionally by scoring the base with a cross before boiling or for a slightly different version make a sprout hash by shredding them finely and steaming for 1-2 minutes before sautéeing with the bacon and coating in clotted cream.

Serves 6clotted

Ingredients

  • 700g Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved and washed
  • 4 rashers crisp-cooked bacon, finely sliced
  • 50g crème fraîche
  • 25g Trewithen Dairy Clotted Cream
  • 2 teaspoons horseradish sauce
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 10ml vegetable oil

Method

  1. clotteddairyIn a bowl mix together the crème fraîche, clotted cream and horseradish sauce, and set aside.
  2. Bring a pan of salted water to the boil, add the sprouts and simmer for 4 minutes, drain well in a colander.
  3. In a frying pan, add the vegetable oil and fry the bacon strips until crisp and golden, carefully remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and place on some kitchen paper.
  4. In the pan add the sprouts and carefully sauté in the fat from the bacon for a few minutes until they just start to colour, remove from the heat and add the cream mixture and crispy bacon, ensure they are liberally coated, taste for seasoning and serve.

I hope you all have a lovely Christmas and that your sprouts are delicious, however you cook them! Smiles, Joanna.

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Dear Santa…

I thought I’d share my personal ‘wish list’ for Christmas books, both cookery and fictional. I have cheated and also included one book that is top of Richard’s wish list – just in case there are any history buffs reading, or if you need an idea for a history-loving relative!

I try very hard to limit my intake of cookery books these days as there’s so much out there for free on the internet. However, nothing compares with curling up with a cup of tea on the sofa and a beautifully illustrated cookbook!

The novels I have included are definitely not candidates for any Booker or Orange, or whatever, book prize – my reading tastes are very straightforward and, if there’s one thing I hate, it’s pretentious literature that you are ‘meant’ to like as you struggle through it. I want to be entertained by a book, I want to smile a bit, cry a little and definitely feel I can’t bear to put it down until I have finished

So, I offer this list just as a personal – “hHere you go, this is what I am asking Santa for this year!” They are all available on Amazon – as are all my own novels (hah!) – surely you knew I wouldn’t be able to resist a plug!

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A Christmas cracker!

You can’t have Christmas dinner without Christmas crackers – well, that’s my view anyway! We groan at the awfulness of the mottos, we laugh at the pointlessness of the ‘gift’ and we feel silly wearing the paper hats… but it is a tradition and we stick to it every year.

In moments of great industriousness, I have made my own crackers and spent ages thinking of appropriate gifts and jokes to go inside. They always go down well, but they take a lot of planning.

This will be my first Christmas without my parents, Diana and John, so this year will be tinged with sadness for all the family. But Mummy’s enthusiasm for a traditional family Christmas is firmly entrenched with all of us and I shall be filling stockings, dressing the table and fussing about the sprouts just as always.

I love decorating the table, I think it makes such an impact with pretty napkins, candles and, of course, a special Christmas table centrepiece. I have produced so many over the years and always find myself getting excited as I add the finishing touches. If you don’t have a large table, you can still make it look lovely with a table runner ­– cheap enough to buy even in supermarkets these days – or run up one of your own very simply. Table sprinkles are also great fun and really do add a touch of glitz and sparkle… but you’ll be hoovering them up for weeks afterwards!

Returning to the Christmas cracker… did you know they were invented in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Thomas Smith? Rather unromantically, he devised the Christmas cracker as a money-making idea when bonbon sales slumped. They originally contained love messages and a sweet. The enterprising Mr Smith then went on to the snapping strip to replicate the sound of a crackling log fire!

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DIY bird feeding station

I’ve just been watching a dear little robin through the window, head cocked, eyes bright – that’s the robin, not me! I always start to fret about the garden birds at this time of year as it gets colder.

I don’t know if it is significant, but I have never seen so many rowan berries as there have been this year, and also lots of holly berries… does that foretell of a bad winter or a mild one? Anyway, forearmed is forewarned and I recently saw this lovely idea for winter bird feeding, so I thought I’d share it with you…

The pine cone, beloved of crafters and flower arrangers everywhere, makes an excellent natural base for a bird feeder. Its open structure is just asking to be stuffed full of titbits for our feathered friends.

  1. Begin by collecting some medium to large pine cones. Don’t worry if they are tightly closed as, once you bring them indoors, they will open. If they are bit reluctant, give them a short warm in the oven.
  1. Attach string to the top of the cone ready to hang it up.
  1. Now, the world is your oyster, or indeed your pine cone! You may want to put rubber gloves on at this point as it gets messy… Spread suet, fat or even peanut butter over the cone, making sure you get it into the gaps between the scales and cover the whole thing.
  1. Place a mix of birdseed on a tray and roll your sticky pine cone until well coated. If you go for a general bird mix, you’ll attract a variety of birds. You could make several pine cone feeding stations and roll others in specific seeds, such as niger for example and you should attract that beautiful, colourful little bird, the goldfinch.
  1. Put your bird feeders in the fridge for an hour or so to make everything set.
  1. Finally, hang your masterpiece in a secluded area of your garden close enough to a hedge or shrub to give a safe haven for the birds if need be, but not somewhere that is likely to help any passing cats get at the birds!
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Parsley harvest!

parlseymontageParsley grows very well in this part of the world it would seem. I can’t say I grow masses of it, but it appears my neighbour has an entire flower bed full! So he very kindly brought round a massive basket overflowing with curly leaved parsley and said, ‘You’re a good cook, you’ll know what to do with this won’t you!’

Hmm, ok… Well, I do use parsley, but this could be an entire year’s supply, how best to preserve it? Never one to waste anything if I can avoid it – I dived into the Internet (thank you Google) and got cracking. I am lucky enough to have a dehydrating machine (bought from Lakeland some years ago) and it’s really handy for herbs. So, we all stood for what seemed like a lifetime stripping leaves off the stems (the term ‘green fingered’ has never seemed more appropriate!) and filling all the trays of the dehydrator. Phew, coffee time.

Looking at the basket when we returned from our break… It looked even fuller than before! This was rather worrying, so drastic measures were called for. So, it was out with the food processor and we whizzed and processed our way through the greenery until it was all finely chopped. I then packed it into the plastic freezer tubs I keep in the cupboard, labelled it and chucked in the freezer! Using it from frozen is fine – just scrape or crumble a bit off and add to whatever you like. I scattered some over the top of lasagne yesterday and a good tablespoon or more has gone into pumpkin soup today – the only good thing about Halloween, in my opinion!

So, I still think it may take a year to use it all up but it’s going to be really handy and a big thank you to my neighbour!

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