Keeping it contained!

Just as I enjoy small and intricate card designs, so I enjoy smaller, creative container gardening. It also makes me feel good as I can be frugal by recycling objects that might otherwise be thrown out, like old wellies, and results in something totally original that appeals to my slightly quirky nature!

Now I know you can be thoroughly green and use cut out milk cartons, plastic bin liners and old tyres, but I think whatever you use for your plant containers needs to fit in with your surroundings and be to your style, otherwise, you won’t be happy with the end result.

My favourite quirky planters include old watering cans, old wellies (the more colourful, the better!) and tin cans. The latter need some care and using tins with ring-pull tops are best as they give you a safer edge, you don’t want to cut yourself, but I do think they look good. Any containers you use will need drainage holes, so you might need to get someone (a man with a drill?!) to help you do this, unless it’s something soft when you can probably punch or cut the holes yourself.

Alternatively, old kitchen utensils such as colanders have built-in drainage holes and you don’t need moss or coir to line them – they make great hanging baskets too! Perhaps this is something Victoria should think about in our second novel ‘A Violet Death’, due out very shortly! Oops – did I just give our next book a plug there? Naughty me!

Have a think about what flowers will be right for the scale of your containers and try and get a nice mix of trailing and taller plants and decide whether you want similar colours, or more vibrant contrast shades. 

One lovely idea is to grow herbs in tin cans or in old kitchen utensils, they look great and it’s so apt too!

Here are a few more tips to help you get the best out of your containers:

  • Always raise your containers off the ground so that they can drain freely, both in summer and especially in winter, when they can freeze.
  • Water plants either first thing in the morning or in the evening – avoid the middle of the day when temperatures are high and so is the rate of evaporation.
  • Always add a barrier layer between the drainage materials and the compost to stop the compost washing down and blocking drainage holes. Use old net curtains, washing-up cloths, pillowcases, capillary matting, sacking or landscape fabric, and use old broken pots to help drainage.
  • Group containers in their final position before planting, especially when moving heavy pots.

 

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Colourful Couscous!

Edible flowers are a fabulous way to decorate savoury dishes as well as sweet things like cakes and desserts. Here’s a bowl of couscous with some lovely flowers adding a great splash of colour on the top. Obviously you could change the selection depending on what you have in your garden or, if all else fails, some supermarkets are now selling edible flowers – I know Waitrose do. If you are at all unsure, do have a look online to find out what is edible, and what is not. As mentioned in a previous blog, this company local to me, Greens of Devon, has a really useful and very pretty guide, here, that you can refer to.  

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons light olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed but still whole
  • 2 onions, finely diced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 4 cups organic chicken stock
  • 1 cup canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup dried apricots, quartered
  • 1/2 cup dried figs, quartered
  • 1 red bell pepper, cubed
  • 1 cup sultanas soaked in fruit juice
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups couscous
  • Nasturtiums and marigold petals etc to decorate

Method

  1. Sauté the garlic, onions, cinnamon, cumin and turmeric in olive oil, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the chicken stock, stir around well to deglaze the pan then add the chickpeas, apricots, figs, red bell pepper and sultanas. Stir and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes. Discard the garlic and season with salt and pepper.
  2. Put the couscous in a large bowl. Boil 2 1/2 cups water and pour over the couscous. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes. Fluff the couscous with a fork.
  3. Mix all the ingredients together and serve in a bowl garnished with flowers.

 

 

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There’s no need to gild the lily…

My garden is a constant source of inspiration – whether it’s for colour, scent or form. Just by looking at it out of the kitchen window, nature reminds me that so often, less is more, and it’s best to keep things simple.

I have included edible flowers in various recipes lately and, especially in the height of summer as now when we are all eating lots of salads, a delicate sprinkling of blooms or petals can make an ordinary meal look amazing. I threw this nasturtium and calendula salad together when we were working on a recent photo shoot for the blog and I thought how stunning it looked.

Although I have quite a range of edible flowers in my own garden I recently discovered a local company called ‘Greens of Devon’ who sell boxes of beautiful edible flowers by mail order. They also have a great website that includes a guide to all the edible flowers they sell – and there are a lot – and quite a few that I didn’t know were edible. For example, did you know you could tuck into tulips? That was a new one on me! They also include some very tasty recipes that you could try. Click on each flower in their guide and it tells you what the flower tastes like and suggests how you might use it – really fun!

Their boxed flowers are very much special occasion prices (!) but it is so easy to grow them yourself, cost should not be an issue. All these very common flowers are edible:

Pansy, borage, viola, pea, mallow, primula, dianthus, chive, rose and sunflower. Note that I am talking flowers and petals here and NOT bulbs – that’s a whole different area.

Just as with anything you do design-wise, think about colour and form to get the best effect with edible flowers. For the salad, as I was using big bold nasturtiums, I didn’t want to confuse things with a mix of colours, so used a similar coloured calendula to keep it striking and simple. Other times, when I have sprinkled petals, or tiny flowers like violas, over cakes I might go for a range of colours to give more of a naturally scattered look – but hey – the choice is yours! Experiment! Go mad and chuck a few petals around the kitchen! Richard, poor chap, is used to me doing such things, so never bats an eyelid on his way to make a coffee. Hey ho! 

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The language of flowers…

I saw a post earlier this month on Facebook about the rose being the birthday flower for June and I thought “Aha!” Time to remind myself which flowers are for which months, as it can make a lovely, apt, birthday present for friends who love their gardens or, like me, just love having flowers in the house. It also reminded me about the ‘language of flowers’…

Sometimes called ‘floriography’, the language of flowers is all about sending messages through the arrangement of flowers. Meaning has been attributed to flowers for thousands of years but interest in floriography really took off in Victorian times. Gifts of blooms, plants, and specific floral arrangements were used to send a coded message to the recipient, allowing the sender to express feelings that could not be spoken aloud in buttoned-up Victorian society! Armed with floral dictionaries, Victorians often exchanged small ‘talking bouquets’, called nosegays or tussie-mussies, which could be worn or carried as a fashion accessory. It’s a rather lovely idea and such a shame that now, most people just text or tweet each other – so unromantic!

But there… for those of us that still have a bit of romance, or poetry in our souls, here’s a list of birthday plants for each month, plus their significance. This isn’t definitive and you’ll find some differences, but you’ll get the general idea!

January: Carnation
The flower is said to symbolise love, fascination and distinction. Carnations come in every shade and each colour can symbolise a sentiment or emotion. Pink means affection, a white carnation mean good luck, whereas a yellow carnation denotes disappointment or exclusion.

A Victorian tussie-mussie.February: Violet
Although this month is associated with St. Valentine’s Day and red roses, the flower for the month is violet. The flower symbolises faithfulness, humility and chastity. Giving violets in the Victorian era conveyed the message ‘I’ll always be true’.

March: Daffodil
This month is synonymous with the onset of spring and accordingly the flower associated with this month is the daffodil also known as jonquil or narcissus. A gift of these flowers conveys the hidden meaning of friendship and happiness.

April: Sweet pea
The sweet pea is said to symbolise pleasure or good-bye. In the Victorian era, these flowers formed a part of the bouquet that was sent to someone to convey gratefulness.

May: Lily of the valley
The flower conveys sweetness and humility. In the Victorian era, they conveyed the romantic message ‘You have made my life complete’.

June: Rose
Roses are available in many colours and each has its own special meanings, but the underlying message the flowers convey is that of love and passion.

Pink larkspur for contrariness!July: Larkspur
With its simple form, feelings of open heart and ardent attachment are attributed to it. Again, there are different meanings for each colour. Pink denotes contrariness, white expresses a happy nature, and a first love is usually symbolized by purple.

August: Gladiolus
It stands for sincerity and symbolises strength of character.

September: Aster
The name of the flower – which looks like a star – is derived from the Greek word for star and, in the language of flowers, it symbolises love, faith and wisdom.

October: Marigold or Calendula
The marigold stands for sorrow and sympathy.

November: Chrysanthemum
Compassion, friendship and joy. Chrysanthemums have different meanings. Red is for love, white means innocence, and yellow denotes unrequited love.

December: Narcissus
The narcissus symbolises sweetness.

 

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Get well soon!

When I am thinking about a get well soon card, my mind usually turns to very pretty scenes or flowers or to something that will bring a smile to the poorly person – like House-Mouse for example.

This particular get well card uses an image from the One Summer’s Day CD and has been printed off on canvas textured card to add something a bit different. I adore white garden furniture and would love to be able to recreate a scene like this in my garden – maybe I should start saving for some… and the little white cat looks gorgeous too doesn’t it!

I think this card shows so beautifully how die cuts and images mixed with sympathetic backing papers can make a truly beautiful card! Well done Jo Westwick who made this one – I just love it!

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