A vintage anniversary card

I had such fun making this card as I adore all things vintage… if there’s a chance of making a project slightly vintage I grab it! It’s no challenge to make the gorgeous images on the Barbara Anderson pads a little bit vintage. They are all vintage collages and I just love her work.

There are twelve different images in the pad and two of each design. For this card I have taken borders from both of the sheets featuring this design and I will use the remaining topper on another card withouta border. One border is at the top (placed upside down to get the heaviest concentration of roses) and the other at the base of the card. The sentiments come on the sheet too.

I have embellished each side of the main image with the Signature dies Tessa lace edger and stuck it onto the main card using foam tape to give it a lift.

That’s when I started playing – oh I do love old button! My mother had a button box and as a child I adored just going through it and ‘sorting’ the buttons. I still have the box and add to it when I can. I showed it to Grace the other day and she stared at me as though I was talking a foreign language.

“But what does it do Granny?”

“Oh you just choose your favourites and sort them into colours, it’s great fun.”

“Why don’t you play with that granny while I play with Grandpa.”

OK… point taken 21st century children think you are nuts for sorting buttons! Will they even learn how to sew on a button? Who knows.

I used glue gel to secure the buttons, you need a fairly good sized blob to hold them in place. It doesn’t work trying to use something like a quickie glue pen.

Have fun – meanwhile I’ll just sit here sorting my buttons…



Sunshine and swing seats

Ah yes, sunshine and swing seats… Now that summer is a distant memory, I thought I’d reminisce about the summers of my childhood with this pretty card. When I was little we used to go and visit my godmother deep in the country and the main thing I remember from her garden was a lovely swinging seat. I have always loved swings and the luxury of a wide and comfy seat with cushions while you are swinging – yes, I was easily entertained!

The background image on this card is from one of the new Jane Shasky pads, Birds in the Garden. All of Jane’s work is brilliant for cardmaking but the latest couple of pads, Garden Delights and Birds in the Garden are particular lovely.

On this card I have snipped up a Morning Glory Vine die and wound the pieces around the swing seat, which softens it and adds a lovely embellishment. The basic card is 8” x 8” which is a size I find really easy to work with.


Simple pleasures…

As we get older, I think we become more aware of ‘simple’ pleasures’, well I know I do! The smell of coffee brewing, freshly cut grass or hearing an owl hoot – all simple things that give immense pleasure.

I read the other day that Vita Sackville-West (she of Sissinghurst Garden fame, amongst other things…) used the term ‘through leaves’ to describe simple pleasures enjoyed by her family. She coined the phrase after “the small but intense pleasure of kicking through leaves while out walking”, which I thought was rather lovely.

Another classic, that I expect almost all of us know, are the lyrics to the song ‘My favourite things’ from the Sound of Music, including whiskers on kittens, warm woollen mittens and brown paper packages tied up with string.

It’s so easy to think that pleasures have to be big and expensive, like holidays, or fancy clothes… but I think we start to appreciate the simple things the more we experience life. You often hear people who have survived cancer, or cheated death in an accident or natural disaster, say how they appreciate every day, every moment, and are more aware of what’s around them.

I had a think about my ‘through leaves’ moments, and came up with the following list:

  • The smell of baking bread (thanks to Richard and his bread maker!)
  • Little Grace running towards me with her arms open
  • A beautiful sunset (or dawn, but that’s rare!)
  • Hearing my daughters say a casual I love you
  • Finishing a card and sitting back and thinking – that’s a keeper!

My co-author Julia was here (we were busy having a book signing session!) and I asked her, for her ‘Through leaves’ moments and she said:

  • Standing in the middle of her runner bean arch(!)
  • Being greeted by her dog, Moss, in the morning
  • Watching beech leaves unfurl in spring
  • Walks on frosty mornings
  • Birdsong

So what are your ‘through leaves’ moments? Do let me know… smiles, Joanna



Cosmos and hanging baskets

If you read the title and thought “You can’t put cosmos in a hanging basket” you would probably be correct!

There may be some mini ones I am not aware of but the glorious softly waving flowers at the back of my border would definitely not fit in a basket! No, the title refers to the mix on this card where I have embellished one of Jane Shasky’s amazing images with a die cut basket full of flowers.

The Signature dies I used for this were Hanging Basket and Flowers for Containers. The flower die was specially designed so you can fill the basket to size and choose how you colour them.

You could focus on bright reds as if it were a basket of geraniums, or if the card needs something soft and dgentle – how about cream, white and pale yellow? The joy of diecutting in white is playing with your markers to get something completely unique for your project.

The butterfly in the top right corner is snipped away from the diecut of Butterfly Cloud. The other butterflies all come on the sheet from the pad.

It’s a simple card but a fun change of colour combination for me, I did enjoy playing with this design.


Tulip mania!

The humble tulip, so often seen wrapped up in cellophane on a garage forecourt, actually has a fascinating and exciting history that’s as good as any romantic novel!

It started life as a wild flower until it began being cultivated in Persia, probably in the 10th century. Rather sweetly, the name ‘tulip’ is thought to come from a Persian word for turban, which it may have been thought to resemble. It then carries on growing quietly, relatively unnoticed… but all that changed in the 1630s when the tulip became the ‘It girl’ of its era, an incredibly valuable commodity on which fortunes were made and lost.

Tulips finally came to the attention of the west in the sixteenth century, when diplomats to the Ottoman court observed and reported on them. Tulips were rapidly introduced into Europe and botanists started to hybridize the flower and they soon found ways of making even more decorative and tempting specimens. Hybrids and mutations of the flower were seen as rarities and a sign of high status – definitely the Burberry handbag of its day!

In the months of late 1636 to early 1637 there was a complete ‘Tulip mania’ in the Netherlands. The enthusiasm for the new tulips triggered a speculative frenzy and tulip bulbs became so expensive that they were treated as a form of currency, or rather, as futures. Some examples of the flower could cost more than a house in Amsterdam at this time.

There was an inevitable crash in prices in 1637, when people came to their senses and stopped purchasing the bulbs at such high prices. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, interest in the tulip remained, but the Dutch became the true connoisseurs and stockists. To this day, tulips are associated with the Netherlands, and the cultivated forms of the tulip are often called ‘Dutch tulips.’ The Netherlands has the world’s largest permanent display of tulips at the Keukenhof.

In their natural state tulips are adapted to mountainous areas with temperate climates. Flowering in the spring, they become dormant in the summer once the flowers and leaves die back, emerging above ground as a shoot from the underground bulb in early spring.

Nowadays, there are many different tulip varieties to choose from and you can still buy some of the original ‘wild’ varieties, often called ‘species’ tulips.

Not everyone loves tulips and not everyone seems to have much success growing them, I certainly don’t! Is it one of your favourites, or would you rather be presented with a bunch of something else?