Just the tonic!

Hair tonics are not something you often see among commercial hair care products. They are a special hair treatment that can be applied as a finishing rinse. These tonics and rinses will help make hair shinier, have more body and generally look healthier. Think of it as an extra dose of help, whether your hair is in good, bad or indifferent condition!

To make up hair tonics, or finishing rinses, simply infuse the herbs for about an hour. To make an infusion, put the herbs in a measuring jug and add the correct amount of boiling water. Leave to infuse and then strain through a sieve and discard the herbs. Then add the essential oil, and any other ingredients included in the recipe, to the cooled infusion.

Use the tonic after you have finished any other treatments on your hair. Stand over a large bowl or hand basin, with the plug in, and pour the mixture over your hair. Recycle as much of the liquid as possible using a cup and pour it over your head again to get as much as possible into your hair. Then gently massage your scalp.

Finally, use a little cool water to lightly rinse off the tonic. Don’t use a power shower to blast all the mixture off as the idea is that the treatment will continue working on your hair until the next time you come to wash it.

Rosemary Herbal Finishing Rinse

For all hair types

  • ·      2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary leaves (or 1 tablespoon of dried)
  • ·      300ml boiling water
  • ·      2 drop rosemary essential oil.

Chamomile and Lemon Tonic

For fair hair

  • ·      2/3 cup of chamomile flowers
  • ·      500ml boiling water
  • ·      Juice from 1 lemon
  • ·      2 drops lemon essential oil
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No need to shell out!

I hate throwing things away, especially natural things, so I’m always interested in ideas for recycling. Egg shells are of course lovely things in their own right, and we’ve talked about blowing and painting them before… but what about the typical broken egg shells that we throw away every day after we’ve used the eggs?

My Hen Pal, Julia Wherrell obviously has lots of eggshells and has some interesting ideas on what to do with them, plus some ideas she’s been told by other hen enthusiasts… see what you make of these…

1. Sprinkle broken up eggshell around your garden to deter pests

Soft-bodied insects like slugs or snails don’t like crawling over sharp pieces of shell, I find it works really well.

2. Give your tomatoes a calcium boost

Blossom-end rot is a common tomato problem and it’s caused by a calcium deficiency in the plant. A very successful veg gardener friend of mine puts eggshells in the bottom of the hole when he plants out his tomatoes to help combat this problem. I’m definitely trying this next year as my tomatoes were rubbish this year!

3. Use them to start seedlings

I think this is a lovely idea, especially if you are short of space. Give your smaller seedlings a start in rinsed-out shells! An egg box fits perfectly on a small windowsill so use this to hold your eggshells. They need to be at least half shell in size, so try and remember that when you’re next cracking some eggs, rinse them clean and then plant up your seedlings as normal but obviously, best to stick to smaller things, like herbs. When you come to plant out, gently crush the shell as you plant it and it will decompose in the soil around your plant.

4. Compost them

Add calcium to your compost by adding shells to your compost bin.

5. Sow directly into the soil

If you don’t have time, energy or inclination to compost, simply dig crushed shells directly into your garden. It’s still better than just chucking them out!

 

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Rustic charm…

Isn’t this a pretty card? This image is from the Jane Shasky CD. I have lost count of how many times I have got this CD out of the case and felt sure there was going to be something that would suit a specific card or project I had in mind. There are so many lovely ideas on there. As you know I am very enthusiastic about herbs and so the images really do inspire me over and over again!

The printing has been done on a cream textured paper this time which adds a nice extra touch to the design. The cream card base is approximately 8” x 8” and the next layers are dark green and then some of the textured cream. Wrap some sage green ribbon around these and tie with a knot (makes a nice change from a bow) and then attach to the card blank with 2mm foam to give a bit of a lift.

The topper is constructed by using three same size toppers. One is the background, a second has the herbs cut out and then decoupaged onto the base. The third has a cream border left around it and the centre removed with a sharp craft knife and ruler. I often find a glass mat helps a craft knife cut more easily.

Layer the base image onto dark green and gold and attach to the card. Then using some string, knot a couple of pieces top right and bottom left across the frame and fix onto the card with foam tape.

This card is so pretty I am sure someone would tuck it away as a keepsake!

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Hot Brie with hazelnuts on a watercress sauce

Have to say, this is one of my favourite recipes. The warm gooey-ness of the rich cheese is very comforting and, as I feel the inevitable arrival of Autumn (after no summer at all) it seems rather timely… sigh….

I love Brie, but you can make this with another cheese if you prefer. Great as a dinner party starter (as per this recipe), or a delicious veggie main meal perhaps made using two different types of cheese, camembert is another good one… it’s up to you.

You will need:

  • 350g (12oz) ground hazelnuts
  • 225g (8oz) granary breadcrumbs
  • 675-900g (1/2-2lb) small whole Brie
  • 50g (2oz) self-raising flour
  • 4 large eggs, beaten

For the Watercress Sauce

  • 1 bunch fresh watercress
  • 1 handful of fresh parsley
  • 30g (2 tbsp) fresh chives
  • 15g (1tbsp) fresh dill
  • 100g (4oz) plain Greek yoghurt
  • 30ml (2 tbsp) mayonnaise
  • 22ml (12 tbsp) lemon juice
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Sprigs of watercress for decoration 

The Brie

Mix the hazelnuts and breadcrumbs together. Cut the Brie into eight equal pieces. Coat each piece with flour then brush on the egg, or dip the cheese in the egg, and roll in the crumb mixture. Dip the cheese in the egg a second time and roll it in the nuts and breadcrumbs again. Cover a baking sheet with a piece of greaseproof paper and place the pieces of cheese on it until they are needed.

Deep-fry the pieces of cheese for about 1-2 minutes and then place in the oven, pre-heated to 180ºC 9350ºF), Gas mark 4, for another 4-5 minutes. Do not leave the Brie in the fat or the oven for too long or it will run everywhere and look terrible! Serve in a pool of chilled watercress sauce – see below.

Watercress Sauce

Place all the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and process for 20-30 seconds until well incorporated. If you don’t have a food processor or blender you should mince all the herbs or chop them very finely, and mix well with the other ingredients.

To serve, spoon a puddle of sauce on to the middle of the plate, place a hot Brie portion on top and decorate with a sprig of watercress.

 

 

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Nature’s first aid kit…

I love herbs and flowers but would never call myself an ‘expert’ on their more alternative uses and I am constantly being surprised by the things I discover they can be used for in relation to our health and well-being.

I was always told to use a dock leaf to relieve the pain of nettle stings, but reading my pal Julia Horton-Powdrill’s Wild Pembrokeshire website last week I saw her recommend this instead:

“Pick a young nettle leaf and scrunch it up tightly so that it gets juicy. It won’t sting. Then rub it onto the stings. There are one or two herbs/plants that help ease stings, but this one will always be on the spot – so to speak!”

Someone else on her website was extolling the virtue of rib leaf plantain as being wonderful for binding wounds and staunching bleeding. Natures first aid kit!

I am very keen on the soothing benefits of herbs and rosemary has a great many uses in this area. It is a common ingredient in sleep pillows and can be combined with other herbs like lavender, hops, and chamomile – they really are very restful.

Fennel is one of nine Anglo-Saxon herbs known for secret powers. In ancient days, a bunch of fennel hung over a cottage door on Midsummer’s Eve was said to prevent the effects of witchcraft. Today, if witches are not a problem, try nibbling on the herb’s seeds, as Roman women did centuries ago, to help depress the appetite!

Our dear old friend, sage – which I expect almost everyone has growing in their herb patch, could almost be called a cure all. The botanical name (Salvia officinalis) is derived from salvere, meaning ‘to be in good health’.

Sage acts as an antiseptic and soothes coughs and colds, flu, bronchitis, swollen glands, laryngitis, is a relaxant for nervous disorders, relieves headaches and expels worms! It is also very effective for the treatment of cystitis.

Sage (pictured right) has always been thought of as good for the brain, improving the memory and, in some cases, even as a cure for insanity. So there’s hope for me yet! And if that wasn’t enough… a sprig of sage in the wardrobe will keep away moths!

One of the joys of the internet is that there is so now much information about these things at our finger tips. But, as with all natural remedies, do exercise caution as concentrated doses can be immensely powerful. If you are pregnant I suggest you don’t try ANY of these ideas.

 

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