Remember rosemary…

I think most of us tend to think of the herb rosemary alongside roast lamb, I know I certainly do! But there’s much more to this zingy Mediterranean herb than you might think…

Its Latin name means ‘dew of the sea’, possibly because in its natural habitat it often grows on the sea cliffs of the Mediterranean. It is a hardy evergreen shrub and, once established, will chug on happily in most gardens throughout the year. It comes in compact and trailing varieties and really is a bit of a gem.

It is a plant I love to have in my garden, not just to because it is so wonderfully pungent and fresh when picked, but because of its delicate lilac-blue flowers that appear in winter to bring cheer. Brush against it on the coldest of days and the fragrance transports you to warmer climes… The flowers are edible and give a sweeter, lighter flavour than the leaves. What could make a prettier addition to a winter salad?

Rosemary planted as a hedge outside a local school… lovely for little hands to brush against.

Fresh or dried leaves can be used to flavour meat, soups and many other dishes, while sprigs steeped in olive oil give it a distinctive flavour. It’s becoming more common to see recipes for fish using rosemary and, given where it grows in the Mediterranean, that’s really no surprise. I think it works really well.

It is also surprisingly good in some sweet recipes – add a teaspoon of dried rosemary to an ice cream mix before making it. It’s particularly good with peach, strawberry, and lemon flavours. Or, why not try making this simple syrup and add it to summer drinks:

Rosemary syrup

  • 250ml of water
  • 200g granulated sugar
  • 2 good sprigs of rosemary
  1. Put all the ingredients into a pan, heat gently until the sugar has dissolved.
  2. Bring to the boil and simmer for a few minutes.
  3. Leave it to cool and then pour it into a jar, rosemary sprigs and all, and store in the fridge. Simply add a splash of rosemary syrup to cold drinks, such as orange juice, lemonade… or even a gin and tonic!

Tea made by infusing chopped leaves in boiling water helps digestion, so it’s no surprise to learn that rosemary belongs to the same family as mint, also a great choice for aiding digestion.

In the Middle Ages, rosemary was associated with wedding ceremonies. The bride would wear a rosemary headdress, while the groom and wedding guests would wear a sprig of rosemary. I went to a wedding last year where the corsages included rosemary, they looked (and smelled) wonderful!

Rosemary has a reputation for improving memory and has been used as a symbol of remembrance during war commemorations and funerals. Mourners would throw it into graves as a symbol of remembrance for the dead. And in case we were left in any doubt, even The Bard mentions it. In Hamlet, Ophelia says, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.”

 

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Handy omelettes!

I thought I might do a little series of reviews/articles on kitchen gadgets that I love – some may feature gadgets you already know, some may introduce something that may or may not be handy for you in the kitchen. This week I thought I would show you my trusty omelette maker.

Now I know we can all make stunning omelettes using a standard omelette sized frying pan and a little butter to fry the eggs in etc. etc. Well, I am rubbish at flipping and often end up with far more scrambled egg than omelette looking results. So I invested in one of these little omelette gadgets and I have to say I just LOVE it.

The main bonus for me is that you pop your egg mixture in, close the lid and WALK AWAY … yay love the freedom of not standing over a pan and messing up! I bought this particular omelette maker in Aldi and it was only £12.99 – but there are dozens on Amazon at this sort of price or slightly more. I bought a second one for a friend from Amazon (as Aldi appeared to have sold out) and it was £17 or so including postage.

You can add anything you like to the mix. Leftovers are hugely common ingredients for me as I love the idea that I get an interesting omelette for breakfast and/or lunch and am not wasting a thing. Here’s the omelette I made for our lunch today:

Prawn and veg omelette

  • 2 large eggs (if they aren’t large use 3)
  • Few jumbo prawns, best to chop them
  • Leftover cooked carrot and broccoli
  • 1-2 oz of grated cheese (I used mozzarella)
  • Dried parsley (better yet use fresh!) salt and pepper

The method is ridiculously easy – take a bowl, crack eggs into it, whisk a bit to mix yolks and whites. Add seasonings and then all the remaining ingredients. I use a large pyrex measuring jug as this is easier to pour mix into the gadget.

Take your mixture, pour half into each of the two compartments. Shut lid. Set your kitchen timer for 8 minutes, then check if you think they are sufficiently cooked – if not, close lid for another minute or two and check again.

You can serve hot – or leave to get cold. They are VERY easily transported for work lunches and taste like the filling of a quiche when cold and the list of possible ingredients is huge. Curried leftovers, pizza flavoured ingredients, ham, bacon, mushroom, fish or just cheese… you choose!

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Guerrilla gardening!

There is a roundabout, just off the A30 on the way to my crime writing partner Julia’s house, that is a delight to behold in the spring and summer when it is a mass of colour with wildflowers in profusion. This oasis in the middle of a three-way junction is the work of a local ‘guerrilla gardener’!

Marvellous, we cry! But did you know that planting roundabouts and road verges with flowers and plants is actually illegal? Going onto and planting any land you do not own is illegal in most countries in the world. How very dull…

However… very few people have ever been prosecuted. Councils are in a difficult position because there are, understandably, health and safety issues around people gardening on roundabouts at night and they can’t be seen to condone it. Sense seems to prevail though and most authorities take a relaxed stance and, if people enjoy the results and no damage is done, they tend to turn a blind eye.

If you fancy a bit of rebellion in a terribly nice and green-fingered way, you may want to look at The Guerrilla Gardener’s blog. He says: “Let’s fight the filth with forks and flowers” which strikes me as a very fine sentiment!

As you may know from previous blogs, I am a bit of a fan of things in miniature. So if you fancy trying some guerrilla gardening on a smaller scale, have a look at the fabulous images and ideas on The Pothole Gardener’s blog. He creates miniature gardens in potholes – and before you rush out into the middle of your local dual carriageway, I should add these are potholes in pavements, not roads! As much as I would love to do this, I fear my knees would not be co-operative!

Have you spotted any guerrilla gardening near where you live? Or, have you ever undertaken any yourself…? Do let us know!

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I love lavender!

I know I write often about lavender, but it’s a herb that brings me so much pleasure. I love the way it looks in the flower beds in the garden, but I also admire the many different ways it can be used.

Let’s start with drying or preserving it, so simple … the trick I feel is picking it at the right time. I find I get the best results if I pick lavender that is fully out but only just. If I need decorative dried lavender or just lavender flowers for filling sachets etc., then the bigger the better really. If you pick it too early, the flowers are tight and narrow with minimal colour. Pick a reasonable length of stalk and then bundle together with an elastic band and hang up to dry.

The reason for the elastic band is that the stems shrink as they dry and can slip out of string ties – so use an elastic band and it will shrink to fit so to speak!

If you want dried heads for their scent not their looks, then you can strip the flowers and lay them out to dry – I tend to use a metal pizza tray as it has holes in it (meant to crisp the pizza base no doubt!) cover the tray with some kitchen paper and then sprinkle the flowers across and leave to dry out of strong light.

The final tip I would add is that if your particular variety of lavender has long stalks as opposed to a stubby variety, then don’t waste your stalks – they look interesting bundled (maybe 30-40 stems) and tied with a ribbon – or if you are a real fire person, they smell nice chucked onto the fire with logs.

But really this blog is meant to be about the card – it’s using the new Jane Shasky Garden Herbs paper pad, which I love.

Mat some backing paper onto cardstock and add to the card blank. Tape on the border from the paper pad and mat the main image onto card and glue on, then add white die cuts using our Signature die Bubble narrow ledger (SD484). Add an embellishment of some ribbon and other pieces from the paper pad page and there you are! Simple but fun to make. Maybe you could scent the card with some lavender, or include a sachet?

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Dear Santa…

I thought I’d share my personal ‘wish list’ for Christmas books, both cookery and fictional. I have cheated and also included one book that is top of Richard’s wish list – just in case there are any history buffs reading, or if you need an idea for a history-loving relative!

I try very hard to limit my intake of cookery books these days as there’s so much out there for free on the internet. However, nothing compares with curling up with a cup of tea on the sofa and a beautifully illustrated cookbook!

The novels I have included are definitely not candidates for any Booker or Orange, or whatever, book prize – my reading tastes are very straightforward and, if there’s one thing I hate, it’s pretentious literature that you are ‘meant’ to like as you struggle through it. I want to be entertained by a book, I want to smile a bit, cry a little and definitely feel I can’t bear to put it down until I have finished

So, I offer this list just as a personal – “hHere you go, this is what I am asking Santa for this year!” They are all available on Amazon – as are all my own novels (hah!) – surely you knew I wouldn’t be able to resist a plug!

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