Willow Pattern extravaganza!

This lovely collection of projects all used our fantastic Willow Pattern dies. They are a collection that can be used individually or together to create some really special projects.

I have had willow pattern everyday plates for many years. I think it’s a classic design that fits well with my cottage style kitchen and the ones I have don’t cost the earth – if you happen to break one! There are many objects around that use the willow pattern story. There are several ‘legends’ about the meaning of the Willow Pattern and what it depicts – all fabricated it would seem. It was first published as “The Story of the Common Willow Pattern Plate” in the magazine The Family Friend in 1849… and there was me thinking it had oriental roots.

I looked it up on Wikipedia the other day and this is the legend mentioned there:

The Romantic Fable: Once there was a wealthy Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter (Koong-se). She had fallen in love with her father’s humble accounting assistant (Chang), angering her father. (It was inappropriate for them to marry due to their difference in social class.) He dismissed the young man and built a high fence around his house to keep the lovers apart. The Mandarin was planning for his daughter to marry a powerful Duke. The Duke arrived by boat to claim his bride, bearing a box of jewels as a gift. The wedding was to take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree.

On the eve of the daughter’s wedding to the Duke, the young accountant, disguised as a servant, slipped into the palace unnoticed. As the lovers escaped with the jewels, the alarm was raised. They ran over a bridge, chased by the Mandarin, whip in hand. They eventually escaped on the Duke’s ship to the safety of a secluded island, where they lived happily for years. But one day, the Duke learned of their refuge. Hungry for revenge, he sent soldiers, who captured the lovers and put them to death. The gods, moved by their plight, transformed the lovers into a pair of doves (possibly a later addition to the tale, since the birds do not appear on the earliest willow pattern plates).

If any of you are interested in making the tea set pictured here, made by the lovely Sylvie Ashton then drop me an email on joanna@joannasheen.com and I will pass on the instructions and templates she sent me not long ago.

Generally speaking the cards are all really easy to make as once you have your blue and white theme sorted out (ie white on blue or blue on white) the diecuts make the card by themselves really! Have fun, smiles Joanna.

 

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New Year resolutions!

Just the one glass!

I always have a positive start to January with happy optimistic New Year resolutions and ‘things are going to change this year’ themed hopes and dreams. Then often they come crashing down when I mess up whatever my new intentions were.

Well why would that be I wonder? I suspect it’s because I set ridiculous targets. Unreachable changes are never going to happen in an instant. Habits like overeating, smoking or drinking are unlikely to magically change after the stroke of midnight on the 31st December.

I’m lucky in that I only have my ‘eating too much’ demons to conquer – smoking went out of the window nearly 40 years ago and I managed to slowly cut any alcohol I drink to a teensy minimum a year or two back. So I have hopes for 2018. The main thing for me is to eat healthy food and ‘behave’ 80% of the time and then hopefully the remaining 20% will be tolerable!

Learning Japanese… er, no.

One new year’s resolution many moons ago was to learn Japanese, I did try… however, I am not expanding my languages this year or any other year for now. I am also not planning to climb more than a local hill, so the climbing Everest and swimming the channel thoughts have been binned too!

There are other things that matter to me as resolutions though. Whether it’s an age related thing and my ambitions have mainly been met – my only thoughts and resolve right now are to help my family as much as I possibly can. To see if I can help shepherd granddaughter Grace though childhood and support my girls.

Mount Everest? I think not.

So I think this year my resolution is to pick up the phone, get in the car and generally stop relying on emails and Facebook for communicating with family – you only get one 2018 – so make the best of it and I want to feel happy next December that I did everything I could towards having a happier, well rounded life.

Happy New Year everyone, I wish us all health, contentment and laughter.

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Those were the days

I am a huge fan of Kevin Walsh’s work. If you haven’t had a look through the cardmaking pad Kevin Walsh’s Village Scenes, then do take a moment and click through. He has perfectly captured the olden days(!) that aren’t that old if you are my age but can seem positively historic to youngsters! He also includes some amazing cars. He did a particularly lovely scene with inspector Morse’s Jaguar in it – and we are lucky enough to have a signed print hanging in our hallway! I am a huge Morse fan and a Jaguar fan so it wins on both counts!

The nice thing about nostalgic art is that it can be suitable for men’s card or women’s cards, the memories aren’t limited to just one sex! It was a pad I used a lot to make cards for my Mum and Dad as it pictures scenes that had happy memories for them and little details like the old-fashioned petrol pumps and types of cars made them smile in recognition too.

The backing papers used here have all come from the Thomas Kinkade triple CD. There are many really handy backing papers on there that, although they work well for Kinkade cards, also look great for many other designs.

While this isn’t the biggest of cards at only 170mm x 170mm (that’s about 6 ½” square in ‘old money’!), the details will make sure it is received with pleasure.

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We all love an Advent calendar!

As today is 1st December, I thought it would be fun to look at that Christmas favourite – the Advent calendar!

As a child, I can remember being SO excited about opening the little numbered windows in the run up to Christmas Day. Back then, there was nothing more than a picture behind each door or, if I was very lucky, a chocolate and I found it thrilling! Today, you can buy Advent calendars stuffed with 24 ‘surprises’ ranging from chocolate to gin and everything in between, with just as many aimed at adults as children. Each to their own of course, but I can’t help feel it’s another nice little innocent tradition that has been thoroughly hijacked by commercialism! But hey ho… I thought I’d do a bit of delving and look back into the origins of the Advent calendar.

An Advent calendar is used to count the days of Advent in anticipation of Christmas. Technically, the date of the first Sunday of Advent can fall anywhere between between November 27 and December 3, but today, pretty much all Advent calendars begin on December 1. It’s widely accepted that the Advent calendar was first used by German Lutherans in the 19th and 20th centuries but is now common across most Christian denominations.

Traditionally, Advent calendars featured the manger scene, Father Christmas or idyllic snowy landscapes and featured paper flaps, windows or doors, covering each date. The little windows opened to reveal an image, a poem, a portion of a story (such as the story of the Nativity), or a sweet treat. Often, each window had a Bible verse and Christian prayer printed on it and Christians would incorporate this into their daily Advent devotions.

Today, as well as covering a mind-boggling array of indulgent treats, the calendars can take the form of fabric pockets, painted wooden boxes with cubby holes for small items or, as I spotted online, a train set with 24 mini waggons, each loaded with a present… and so on and so on. So much for any religious significance!

In the snowy northern climes of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden there is a tradition of having a so-called ‘Julekalender’ ­– the local word for a Yule, or Christmas – calendar (even though it actually is an Advent calendar) in the form of a television or radio show, starting on December 1 and ending on Christmas Eve. I’m amazed this hasn’t caught on over here! Surely we could have a series of 24 gardening, cooking and dancing shows to trot us up to Christmas in a very merry frame of mind! But then, that wouldn’t seem all that different to our usual TV scheduling, would it?

Oh, but that’s enough of my cheek. My granddaughter Grace will have a lovely traditional Advent calendar (with perhaps just some small sweetie treats!) and I know her little face will light up with joy as she opens each window and begins to feel the magic of Christmas. Smiles, Joanna.

 

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Remembrance Day memories

Whenever we see poppies our minds often turn to Remembrance Day. The new Jane Shasky Perfect Poppies pad has lots of ideas and pages to inspire you whether the card is intended for Remembrance Day, a sympathy card or just a card celebrating someone who is no longer with us.

This particular card shows a photo of my late grandmother’s first fiancée. I say first fiancée as, sadly, this was around the outbreak of the first world war was when she was in her late teens and looking for a husband. So many of our young soldiers and airmen didn’t survive even one posting or flight and this young man was just such a casualty. She went on to meet several others and over the next few years of the war she lost every fiancé as they got engaged. Finally though, there was a happy ending and, just after the war she met my grandfather – hurray! He survived, left the army and although I wasn’t lucky enough to meet him, he died around 1950, so they had a very happy 30 years or so together.

This design uses our memories die and two sheets from the pad. The backing paper which has been matted onto some plain red card and a toppers sheet which I have snipped with my decoupage snips and made all the flowers into individual pieces. I then built them up again to make this corner display using Pinflair glue gel.

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