Remembrance Day memories

Whenever we see poppies our minds often turn to Remembrance Day. The new Jane Shasky Perfect Poppies pad has lots of ideas and pages to inspire you whether the card is intended for Remembrance Day, a sympathy card or just a card celebrating someone who is no longer with us.

This particular card shows a photo of my late grandmother’s first fiancée. I say first fiancée as, sadly, this was around the outbreak of the first world war was when she was in her late teens and looking for a husband. So many of our young soldiers and airmen didn’t survive even one posting or flight and this young man was just such a casualty. She went on to meet several others and over the next few years of the war she lost every fiancé as they got engaged. Finally though, there was a happy ending and, just after the war she met my grandfather – hurray! He survived, left the army and although I wasn’t lucky enough to meet him, he died around 1950, so they had a very happy 30 years or so together.

This design uses our memories die and two sheets from the pad. The backing paper which has been matted onto some plain red card and a toppers sheet which I have snipped with my decoupage snips and made all the flowers into individual pieces. I then built them up again to make this corner display using Pinflair glue gel.

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Moon gazing…

As a child, I was never quite sure if the moon was made of cheese, or whether there was a man living in it, these were both tales I remember being told on numerous occasions! Despite being old enough to watch the moon landing in 1969, I think I still harboured a romantic dream that there just might be cheese up there… or that there was an old man hiding in a crater!

I am sure we have all gazed at the moon, enjoyed its beautiful silvery light on a clear frosty night, or marvelled at how huge a supermoon appears to be. But the moon is a lot more than just a pretty face, it affects our everyday lives – our very existence, in fact. The moon’s gravitational pull produces the ocean tides, something I always find fascinating.

I didn’t realise that there was still so much mystery surrounding the moon. Scientists think it was formed from debris left over from a huge collision between the Earth and another body, but they don’t know for sure. But we do know it is egg shaped, not round, and is moving very slowly away from the Earth…

The moon plays a part in many ancient cultures that developed lunar calendars, Christianity being one of them. Originally, the moon was regarded as being a symbol of wisdom and justice but this later changed to signify madness, or lunacy – from ‘luna’ the Latin word for the moon. Ever since the Middle Ages, epileptic fits were believed to be triggered by the full moon. There is also an old wives tale that warned people not to have surgery around a full moon, as they would bleed excessively – ugh!

There are many myths and tales about the moon and its influence, but no real scientific evidence to back them up, sadly. Dogs are often said to howl at a full moon (I can’t say any of mine have!) and then of course, there’s the whole werewolf scenario! People are still fascinated by the effect of the full moon on human behaviour and it even has its own term, ‘Transylvania Hypothesis’!

There are so many romantic moon-related terms, I thought I’d list a few of them here. The lovely sounding ‘harvest moon’ and ‘hunter’s moon’ are traditional terms for the full moons that we see during late summer and in the autumn, and nowadays we also talk about a supermoon – a full moon or a new moon that coincides with the closest distance that the moon reaches to Earth giving a larger-than-usual apparent size of the lunar disk. The Americans, however, seem to have made an art out of romantic-sounding moon terms, so here are some examples for you:

  • January: Wolf Moon, Old Moon
  • February: Snow Moon, Hunger Moon
  • March: Crow Moon, Sap Moon
  • April: Pink Moon, Egg Moon, Fish Moon
  • May: Milk Moon, Flower Moon
  • June: Strawberry Moon, Rose Moon
  • July: Hay Moon, Thunder Moon
  • August: Corn Moon, Sturgeon Moon
  • September: Harvest Moon, Full Corn Moon
  • October: Hunter’s moon, Blood Moon
  • November: Beaver Moon, Frosty Moon
  • December: Cold Moon, Long Night’s Moon

I love the idea of looking up in the middle of a barbecue and saying, sagely: “Ah yes, it’s a Strawberry Moon tonight!”

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Tulip mania!

The humble tulip, so often seen wrapped up in cellophane on a garage forecourt, actually has a fascinating and exciting history that’s as good as any romantic novel!

It started life as a wild flower until it began being cultivated in Persia, probably in the 10th century. Rather sweetly, the name ‘tulip’ is thought to come from a Persian word for turban, which it may have been thought to resemble. It then carries on growing quietly, relatively unnoticed… but all that changed in the 1630s when the tulip became the ‘It girl’ of its era, an incredibly valuable commodity on which fortunes were made and lost.

Tulips finally came to the attention of the west in the sixteenth century, when diplomats to the Ottoman court observed and reported on them. Tulips were rapidly introduced into Europe and botanists started to hybridize the flower and they soon found ways of making even more decorative and tempting specimens. Hybrids and mutations of the flower were seen as rarities and a sign of high status – definitely the Burberry handbag of its day!

In the months of late 1636 to early 1637 there was a complete ‘Tulip mania’ in the Netherlands. The enthusiasm for the new tulips triggered a speculative frenzy and tulip bulbs became so expensive that they were treated as a form of currency, or rather, as futures. Some examples of the flower could cost more than a house in Amsterdam at this time.

There was an inevitable crash in prices in 1637, when people came to their senses and stopped purchasing the bulbs at such high prices. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, interest in the tulip remained, but the Dutch became the true connoisseurs and stockists. To this day, tulips are associated with the Netherlands, and the cultivated forms of the tulip are often called ‘Dutch tulips.’ The Netherlands has the world’s largest permanent display of tulips at the Keukenhof.

In their natural state tulips are adapted to mountainous areas with temperate climates. Flowering in the spring, they become dormant in the summer once the flowers and leaves die back, emerging above ground as a shoot from the underground bulb in early spring.

Nowadays, there are many different tulip varieties to choose from and you can still buy some of the original ‘wild’ varieties, often called ‘species’ tulips.

Not everyone loves tulips and not everyone seems to have much success growing them, I certainly don’t! Is it one of your favourites, or would you rather be presented with a bunch of something else?

 

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Squeezing through the Corinth Canal

Here’s a final holiday blog for you… some pictures from the island of Sifros and our journey through the Corinth Canal. I hope you have enjoyed some of the highlights of the trip.

One of the main reasons we wanted to do this journey was to see what it was like for a medium sized boat to squeeze through the Corinth Canal. The really big boats can’t make it but we did last night and wow it was spectacular. With only a foot or two to spare each side we took about 45 minutes to cross through this gap carved through solid rock. If you can’t take this shortcut then it’s a 180-mile trip round!

We were guided by a pilot boat and sailed through at a constant 5 knots, excuse me if I don’t regurgitate the mass of techy information the captain gave me about pressures and constant speeds… I just smiled and nodded!

The island I wandered round today was called Sifnos. The guides are all lovely and each one insists their island is the best. I have been trying to be friendly and learn a little Greek and smiled at everyone saying “Calamari!” (Good morning) till the guide politely pointed out that I was yelling “Squid” at everyone and I should have been saying kalimera not calamari. I thought they were looking strangely at me!

The island is so pretty and some of the walls were from 1500BC… so something like 3,500 years old… amazing and the flowers were beautiful, mainly bougainvillea and, as always, tons of olive trees. Lots of locally made bits and pieces, honey, olive soap, amazing ceramics and the ever present wine.

I bought some honey yesterday when I visited the site of the Oracle of Delphi. Apparently, the honey is made from local bees who all use pollen from the calm, positive atmosphere of Delphi and so the honey will bring positive vibes every time it is used. Ok, so I was persuaded…. but it tastes nice so what the heck!

Sadly home again soon, but it has been a very educational but fun trip, will it influence my work, no probably not but it has given us a wonderful rest!

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Tasting olive oil and rocket fuel!

Continuing my holiday adventures…

Yesterday, we docked at a town called Kotor in Montenegro. It was quaintly medieval in many places and very beautiful. I will admit to complete ignorance about Montenegro, the only time I have heard of it was as part of the Eurovision Song Contest but that’s faintly embarrassing! The tour we chose took us around the town and on to a small family olive oil producer.

Left to right: Here I am taking a wander around the old town of Kotor. Ruschka and Mischka the weed control management team. The olive grove.

Our first stop, once we arrived on the farm, was to meet Ruschka and Mischka the weed control management team. Mischka is 18 (on the right) and expecting a baby donkey soon and we shared some of the little welcome doughnuts we had been handed. We didn’t share the welcome drink we were given, I took one sip and immediately passed the rest of the glass to Richard… 50 per cent proof home made brandy… made variously from grapes, apples, plums or, I suspected, any fruit they had handy. It wasn’t unpleasant but wow it blew your head off! They didn’t call it rocket fuel for nothing!

We then moved on to the 300-year-old olive press and machinery, so beautiful, and lovely that it has been preserved. There was a careful explanation of how the oil is extracted. The rubbish/paste left over they reuse as compost material and animal feed. They had goats and sheep for cheese and rabbits for… OK, I will gloss over that one but I kind of assume they may not have kept 20 or so rabbits as pets. They showed us their brand new modern machinery, much less work for the donkeys than the old version, hence their transfer to weed management!

Then we had a lesson on how to taste olive oil and a serious lecture on how the stuff we are all buying is very unlikely to be proper olive oil as most of the supermarkets sell oils that are hugely blended and taste nothing like proper olive oil. Well having tasted some I suspect he was right, it was far fruitier and a little more peppery than the big bottles I buy in Tesco… and a 100cl bottle cost 3 euros direct from the farm, so that is about £25 a litre. Hmm, now what do I pay, about £4.99 at most for a litre. So I may change my ways, I’ll look more carefully when I get home.

Left to right: The old and the new olive presses… and the finished product.

They then gave us a gorgeous lunch, with cheese from their sheep, prosciutto ham made at home by the mother, eggs from their chickens and some lightly battered courgettes. Followed by apple cake (yup made by Mum) and Turkish coffee (fab if you like strong coffee). The cheese was interesting. One was a pale soft cheese which tasted like a mild Lancashire or something along those lines. Then they take some of those cheeses and place them in wire mesh cages and hang them over the patio (!) for three weeks. This dries them out and they then immerse them in olive oil. The resulting cheese was quite firm and almost had the strength of a Parmesan.

Then back to the ship where we found an invitation to eat with the captain tonight, aha … maybe I can persuade him to try card making, he already does various crafts like wood carving etc. in his spare time… so who knows!

The photo at the top is of the beautiful fish filled river and ponds in the town of Kotor.

 

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