There’s nothing like a hottie!!

It must be my age, but I seem to be increasingly aware of the cold. Even though this winter has been mild, a fleece throw or a plump duvet is never a bad thing to have to hand for snuggling purposes.

Before central heating, electric blankets and the duvet (how well I remember my mother buying our first ‘continental quilt’ or duvet which seemed terribly racy at the time!) beds were usually warmed by the good old hot water bottle! Smelling of rubber and occasionally given to springing a leak they were, nonetheless, immensely comforting.
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As a child, I remember seeing an old copper warming pan hanging on someone’s wall and asking what it was. Being told it was used to ‘warm the bed’ in olden days, I spent a lot of time puzzling how you managed to not spill the hot water in such a weird, long-handled thing… not realising they used hot coals rather than water!

Warming pans were in use as early as the 16th century when life was an altogether chillier affair and such warmth must have been very welcome. Soon, containers using hot water were introduced, with the advantage that not only could you keep it in the bed with you, you also were also less likely to set fire to your bedding! As the discovery of rubber was still a long way off, these early hot water bottles were made of various materials such as zinc, copper, glass, earthenware or wood. To prevent burning, the metal hot water flasks were wrapped in a soft cloth bag.

‘India rubber’ hot water bottles were in use in Britain as early as 1875. The hot water bottle, as we know it today, was patented in 1903 and is manufactured in natural rubber or PVC. Not surprisingly, by the late 20th century, the use of hot water bottles had declined around most of the world. Not only were homes better heated, but newer items such as electric blankets were competing with hot water bottles as a source of night-time heat. However, there has been a recent surge in popularity in Japan where it is seen as an ecologically friendly and thrifty way to keep warm, and very sensible too!

There are all sorts of bed heaters on the market now and some of them function like the older bottles but use a polymer gel or wax in a heat pad. The pads can be heated in a microwave oven, and they are generally viewed as safer than liquid-filled bottles or electrically-heated devices. Some newer bottles use a silicone-based material instead of rubber, which resists very hot water better, and does not deteriorate as much as rubber.

Today, hot water bottles come in all shapes, sizes and colours and you can get lovely chunky knitted or prettily patterned fleece covers. They are cheap to buy, quick to prepare and easy to use so perhaps, as the Japanese have discovered, it’s time they made a bit of a comeback!

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New Year’s resolutions and reflections…

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Ahhh! My partner in crime writing Julia was a big Sir Terry fan and met him a couple of times. She confirms he was a lovely, lovely man.

Well, “Goodbye 2016″! I can’t, in all honesty, say I will miss you one bit – and I am excitedly looking forward to what I hope will be a fabulous 2017 for us all.

There seem to have been so many sad deaths of people that brightened our lives with brilliant entertainment – like Terry Wogan (I love that the BBC have named their building Wogan House). Victoria Wood was another entertainer I loved to bits, great lady. The list is horribly long this year with people such as Alan Rickman, Greg Lake, Prince, Ronnie Corbett, Gene Wilder, Andrew Sachs – oh the list is too long to quote. May they all rest in peace.

We have had dramatic political happenings this year (let’s not dwell on those), war and fighting continue in so many areas of the world I can only pray for more peace next year. In my personal world, which I realise does not impact the main population, I lost both my beloved parents only hours apart at the beginning of the year, and then decided I would pop up again on Create and Craft.

Back on Create & Craft!

Back on Create & Craft!

Life goes on and life is for living and the main wisdom that I have ringing in my ears (thank you, Mother) is the advice to live every day to the maximum. Love those around you and tell them so, help the community around you and be the best person that you can.

That’s as close to New Year resolutions that I am going to get for 2017 … oh ok, that old chestnut, I am going to reach my target weight at Slimming World in 2017, but my guess is it will be nearer the end of the year than the beginning, but I will get there!

I wish you all happiness and health, family and friendship and let’s hope the world decides to take a

turn for the better this year!

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Dear Santa…

I thought I’d share my personal ‘wish list’ for Christmas books, both cookery and fictional. I have cheated and also included one book that is top of Richard’s wish list – just in case there are any history buffs reading, or if you need an idea for a history-loving relative!

I try very hard to limit my intake of cookery books these days as there’s so much out there for free on the internet. However, nothing compares with curling up with a cup of tea on the sofa and a beautifully illustrated cookbook!

The novels I have included are definitely not candidates for any Booker or Orange, or whatever, book prize – my reading tastes are very straightforward and, if there’s one thing I hate, it’s pretentious literature that you are ‘meant’ to like as you struggle through it. I want to be entertained by a book, I want to smile a bit, cry a little and definitely feel I can’t bear to put it down until I have finished

So, I offer this list just as a personal – “hHere you go, this is what I am asking Santa for this year!” They are all available on Amazon – as are all my own novels (hah!) – surely you knew I wouldn’t be able to resist a plug!

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A Christmas cracker!

You can’t have Christmas dinner without Christmas crackers – well, that’s my view anyway! We groan at the awfulness of the mottos, we laugh at the pointlessness of the ‘gift’ and we feel silly wearing the paper hats… but it is a tradition and we stick to it every year.

In moments of great industriousness, I have made my own crackers and spent ages thinking of appropriate gifts and jokes to go inside. They always go down well, but they take a lot of planning.

This will be my first Christmas without my parents, Diana and John, so this year will be tinged with sadness for all the family. But Mummy’s enthusiasm for a traditional family Christmas is firmly entrenched with all of us and I shall be filling stockings, dressing the table and fussing about the sprouts just as always.

I love decorating the table, I think it makes such an impact with pretty napkins, candles and, of course, a special Christmas table centrepiece. I have produced so many over the years and always find myself getting excited as I add the finishing touches. If you don’t have a large table, you can still make it look lovely with a table runner ­– cheap enough to buy even in supermarkets these days – or run up one of your own very simply. Table sprinkles are also great fun and really do add a touch of glitz and sparkle… but you’ll be hoovering them up for weeks afterwards!

Returning to the Christmas cracker… did you know they were invented in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Thomas Smith? Rather unromantically, he devised the Christmas cracker as a money-making idea when bonbon sales slumped. They originally contained love messages and a sweet. The enterprising Mr Smith then went on to the snapping strip to replicate the sound of a crackling log fire!

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The sweet smell of rain…

We have enjoyed the most beautiful October here in the Westcountry, in fact, I think most of the country has too. The Autumn colours have been fabulous and it has been unseasonably warm and dry ensuring lots of lovely crisp leaves and breathtaking sunsets.

Today, we have had rain for what seems like the first time in months and, as I went outside, I was struck by the ‘smell’ of the rain. Seriously! It’s rather like that wonderful smell you get when you brush against geranium leaves, an earthy richness, a sense of, well… nature!

As is my way, I looked up ‘the smell of rain’ on the internet… and was delighted to find it has a name – petrichor! I am now working at dropping this word into casual conversation at least once a week! Petrichor is ‘the earthy scent produced when rain falls on dry soil’. The word comes from Greek ‘petra’, meaning stone, and ‘ichor’, the fluid that flows in the veins of the gods in Greek mythology, all rather lovely I thought.

Before it hits the ground, rain is just water, it has no smell. But after the drops hit the ground and interact with soil, the fresh and almost sweet fragrance of rain is released. Now, scientists think they’ve identified the exact mechanism that releases this aroma into the environment. When a raindrop hits a porous surface it traps tiny pockets of air. These bubbles then speed upward, like bubbles in a glass of champagne (hic!), before breaking the drop’s surface and releasing microscopic particles, called aerosols, into the air. The researchers think it’s these aerosols that carry the ‘rain like’ aroma.

This set me thinking about a farmer friend who has a very sensitive nose (he does not like all the stinky cheeses I enjoy!) and he always says he can smell rain coming. Pah, I thought, a Devon farmer’s yarn… but no! Following on from my discovery of petrichor, it seems weather patterns really do produce distinctive odours that sensitive noses can sniff out.

Before the rain begins, one of the first odours we may smell, as winds pick up and clouds roll in, is a sweet, pungent zing in the nostrils. That’s the sharp, fresh aroma of ozone — a form of oxygen whose name comes from the Greek word ‘ozein’, to smell.

After a spell of heavy rain has passed, what’s often left is an earthy, musty whiff of wetness. This is the aroma of geosmin, a metabolic by-product of bacteria or blue-green algae. Ok, not quite so romantic, but interesting, nonetheless.

So, what’s the point of all these strange smells? As you may have guessed, Mother Nature doesn’t do anything without a reason and all these chemicals stirred up by the weather carry messages. Some biologists suspect that petrichor running into waterways acts as a cue to freshwater fish, signalling spawning time. Microbiologist think that geosmin’s fragrance may be a beacon, helping camels find their way to desert oases.

Although humans don’t appear to have a built in response to these odours, we do learn to associate them with our experiences. Flooding may forever scar us with moist, ‘mildewy’ memories, but for many of us, the smell of rain is cleansing and refreshing.

So, if I am spotted running around the car park outside the Create & Craft studios, skipping and shouting “Yippee!” in the rain, I haven’t gone mad, I am simply enjoying the scent of petrichor. Well, that’s what I shall tell everyone anyway!

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