Happy Retirement!

Well, what I wonder is retirement these days? I suspect for me it will be something that may happen when I am too weak and feeble to lift an ink pad or fold a piece of card! However, some slightly more sensible people take time in their later years to relax, retire and either stay at home, move home, travel or take up new interests.

Having just had my 65thbirthday this weekend I am thinking back to when my mother and father were 65 and they moved down here to Devon to live a few houses away from us. For the next few years, they helped with parts of the business that they enjoyed (my mother made wondrous apple pies and homemade cakes), and they took nice breaks away and enjoyed their respective cooking and gardening pursuits.

If you have friends that are planning to retire or are newly retired, they too may opt for different retirement choices and choosing what to put on a card can range from Yay! No more work – to congratulating them on a move to a new house or perhaps celebrating the fact they are starting a brand new venture. Anything is possible at any age these days and just as we have entrepreneurs that are 14, so we can have successful new businesses started by 65-85 years olds!

These cards use the Bungalow and the Tudor Cottage from our recent range that combines all year round houses with Christmas as an extra. So you can utilise the dies with or without the snowy decorations!

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Crafts in France

Time for another of travel blog from Tina Dorr. Here, she gives us the lowdown on traditional and modern crafts in France…

France is a country steeped in traditional crafts, handed down generation by generation – from the master craftsmen such as stonemasons to families that love to make toys and household items out of wood. Go to any market or fete and you will find stalls that sell so many beautiful things that you would be at a loss as to what to buy first.

Wickerwork is very traditional and there are many beautiful baskets on sale. If you fancy one as a decorative piece, you can even buy some stunning dried flowers to put in them. They hang at the stalls in shades of blues, reds, yellows, lilacs and more, and are just so pretty.

Another popular and traditional craft is soap making and you can find soaps of all shapes and sizes in a range of wonderful perfumes, lavender being a huge seller. The fragrance is so strong they can scent a room.

At country fairs, you can still find old traditional crafts such as weaving, lace making, leatherwork and tapestry. Often, you can watch the craftspeople at work and it is fascinating to see such skill and see how things are made.

A lovely piece of upcycling!

As in the UK, other popular crafts in France include knitting, crocheting, painting and upcycling. Upcycling is big business here as you can buy good quality furniture cheaply from a ‘vide grenier’, upcycle it and sell it for a profit. (Vide grenier means ‘empty attic’ and is the French equivalent of car boot sales).

Sadly, from my point of view, papercraft is not huge in France, mainly I think because the French are not big on sending cards. Having said that… it does seem to be starting to take off, probably because of all us Brits that have bought houses here! I know of two large scrapbooking shops in Paris and you can now buy some things online. These are still quite expensive though – so thank goodness for Joanna Sheen!!

Our local hypermarket sells a small number of craft bits and pieces, but that is aimed more towards the children’s market. We also have a shop called Action that sells a lot of British stuff and has quite a large and not badly priced craft section.

I am certainly hoping that papercraft takes off more, in the meantime, I send my French friends and neighbours homemade cards and explain how I make them… You never know, I may get them interested yet!

 

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Christmas abroad

I am very keen on my traditional British Christmas – from stockings and trees to families and board games.
So how, I wonder, will any of our friends and family members who are living abroad be celebrating, probably in sweltering heat and beautiful sunshine.

My younger daughter will (I desperately hope) be given leave to come home for a few days, so I won’t have to ponder how Christmas Day is spent in Singapore. However one of the ladies that work here, now has two daughters living in Australia. I understand there will be much barbecuing, swimming and happy celebrating and they reckon Christmas is just as fun as in the UK.

I do contemplate the idea of a Christmas holiday somewhere hot like the Caribbean – may be a luxury cruise so I don’t have to cook – but I always end up shaking my head and muttering, “Nope, home is best!”

For anyone that has family or friends living far, far away, here are a couple of ideas for cards and remember it’s really early for the last posting date!

Smiles Joanna

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Goodbye summer – hello gloom?

The end of summer, when the children go back to school and the days start to shorten, can seem a rather depressing time. You’ve had a lovely summer, you possibly enjoyed a holiday and felt relaxed… so how do you try and hang on to some of those positive feelings rather than slumping into an Autumnal gloom?

Holidays are good for us. Research has shown that taking time off, be it a holiday away, or just relaxing at home, reduce your stress levels and increases your life expectancy. Now is the time to think about how you can make the most of your post-holiday feel-good factor as immediately after a holiday is the perfect time to make changes to your routine. After your holiday, your brain will be freshly stimulated by a combination of novel experience and physical activity (well, for some of us!) and ready for the idea of positive change. So, with that in mind, here are 5 ways to keep the holiday spirit alive.

Beautiful Dartmoor – I’m lucky enough to have this on my doorstep!

1 Be a home tourist

When did you last appreciate the place where you live? Look at it afresh, as if you were a visitor researching a trip… Put your postcode into TripAdvisor or any other travel site and see what comes up –you’ll probably be pleasantly surprised!

2 Savour the small things

I think this is so important and yet we so rarely do it – and I am as guilty as the next person! When we’re on holiday, we slow down and we use all our senses. We may sit and people watch, or be fascinated by the local bird life or just take time to smell the flowers. Perhaps you could find ways to savour your routine in a way that makes it feel less routine? You could savour your shower – treat yourself to

Get to know your garden bird life… Robins are incredibly bold and friendly characters!

a new shower gel, or you could notice the changing seasons on your way to work, or when you walk the dog or collect the grandkids from school. It doesn’t really matter what you savour, just hang onto your holiday habit of savouring a little bit more.

3 Re-evaluate your routine

On holiday, in a different environment, we behave differently. When you come back from holiday, think about the things you didn’t do when you were away. Obviously, these will include doing the washing, cooking and possibly dropping off and collecting children from various places. But what else freed up your time? Be honest… did you watch less TV? Use your phone less? Have a good think and you’ll probably find ways to free up some time to do other things that you

Try putting it down more!

usually say you haven’t got time for!

4 Plan day trips

This isn’t as daft as it sounds. Years ago, I booked a lovely sounding holiday cottage that turned out to be a dive – pokey cottage in horrible setting – ugh! We left early and came home and, so as not to waste our previous week off, we thought about all the things we wanted to visit locally but had never got around to, and went off every day to attractions, or to nearby towns we’d never seen. It was lovely and still felt like a holiday!

Perhaps try more of a Mediterranean diet?

5 Cook with a new ingredient

Bringing home exotic foods or ingredients from holidays abroad (in the days when you were still allowed to!) was nearly always disappointing in the cold light of your own kitchen. But think laterally… if you can’t find a particular spice of pickle in this country to replicate your delicious Greek feast, why not tone it down a bit and simply try to pick one new ingredient to use each week? If you’re stuck for ideas, supermarkets own magazines are always full of new seasonal ideas you can try.

 

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Family Christmas cards

One of the things I enjoy most about receiving cards in the run-up to Christmas is the addition (hopefully) of up to date photos of my nephews and nieces, cousins and friends’ children. It’s just great to see their little smiling faces and it reminds me that Christmas is so much about family and friends.

This is a sample from my new cardmaking collection from Practical Publishing. The boxed set features one of our favourite artists – Jane Shasky. Her pads and CDs have sold in their thousands for us and she is a special favourite of mine.

The full steps are in the magazine that comes in the collection as are all the ingredients – oh yes, apart from the picture of little Grace! Obviously, you must insert one of your own special people, whether they are young, old or just middling!

 

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