Landmarks on journeys – are we there yet?

 

Whether consciously or not, I think we all have a certain view, or signpost, or possibly even scent that tells us that our journey home is almost complete. It is a rather lovely and comforting sensation and one that brings a sigh of contentment. Of course, it doesn’t have to be reaching home – it could be arriving at a favourite holiday destination or a close friend’s house. Landmarks on journeys lodge in our brains and can bring back waves of nostalgia years later when we come across one by chance.

As a child, the vaguest scent of the sea (often imagined!) would start me wheedling “Are we there yet?” from the backseat of the car. One friend, who had to commute up and down to London from Devon three times a week told me he always gave a cheer when he drove past the ‘Devon’ county boundary sign on the M5.

Cookworthy Knapp – the ‘coming home’ trees. Photo copyright: ALAMY

My partner in crime writing, Julia, was amazed to see a photo on the BBC website this week of a much-loved copse of beech that she always says ‘Hello’ to as she goes on holiday to Cornwall and crosses over the Devon/Cornwall

border. Apparently, it is an incredibly popular landmark with lots of people! The beech trees, which stand on a hill south of the A30, tell weary Cornwall-bound travellers that their journey is nearly over.

Now, says the BBC, people have been taking to social media to share their love for the Cookworthy Knapp trees, which were planted around 1900 and have become known as the ‘coming home trees’.

I thought this was rather lovely and set me thinking about what are my ‘coming home landmarks’. I have two – the lovely sweeping view of the Teign estuary as we drive over the road bridge on the last 10 miles of our journey home… and the dear little fingerpost on the Torquay Road that says, very small, ‘Stokeinteignhead’!

And so… I’d like to hear from you – what are your ‘coming home’ landmarks? Are they distinctive hills, or trees, or signs, or something more quirky? Let’s hear it! Smiles, Joanna.

The Teign estuary… I’m almost home! And, just to be sure, the little fingerpost confirms it’s only half a mile.

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Seagulls and Butterflies

Seagulls and butterflies  – these two cards are a lovely summery pair to inspire you to make a card, whether it’s someone’s birthday or to show you are thinking about them.

Both images come from the Marjolein Bastin Summer pad and I am constantly happy that we came up with the combination of “almost everything you need on one sheet” pads! It saves so much time and frustration if you all you need to do is dip into your stash for the blank cards and perhaps the odd embellishments or two.

The Seagull card is simple – some matting and layering on white and grey card with a trellis style backing paper. Then the border and decoupage pieces are all from the same sheet on the pad.

The pretty little butterfly card uses the addition of the Signature Dies Jessica lace border (SD514) and some rhinestones as well as all the interesting little embellishments included on the page of the Summer paper pad.

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Birthday in Paris

 

I absolutely love this birthday in Paris card – it’s a simple process but doesn’t it look amazing. The spots/dots on the base card are made using a Japanese screw punch – just press it around wherever you want a hole – fabulous gadgets!

Ingredients:

  • Plain cream 8” square card blank
  • Pink cardstock and cream card
  • Circular dies (or draw around a plate/saucer?)
  • Selection of alcohol inks
  • Signature dies Paris SD537 and Classica Word set (Multibuy is best bargain)
  • Ribbon and glues etc

How to:

  1. Start by punching a load of holes in the cover of the card blank – don’t worry too much about the middle as obviously this will be covered by the image. Now wrap some ribbon around the left-hand side of the card, and secure inside. Then add a 7½” piece of pink card onto the back of the front cover, hiding where the ribbon was secured and making the pink dots appear!
  2. Cut out some circles – the pink one measure 6½” and then a cream one a little smaller. If you have a circular die that size – that’s perfect …. if not then you can draw around something circular like a saucer that’s conveniently the right size!
  3. Die cut the Paris die twice. Use one die upside and pat some alcohol inks around and across it. Allow it to dry and then attach the nice clean die cut with some glue gel or foam pads.
  4. Finally, tie a bow and attach that to the left-hand side of the card.
  5. The little handbag is made from a template found on the internet, decorated with some paper scrabble style letters and a die cut coloured brown.
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Quirky museums for Easter holiday fun

The year seems to be galloping by and, tomorrow, it will be April! If you find yourself looking for a way to entertain youngsters during the school holidays, why not try some of the country’s more quirky museums? There are some amazing ones around – have a Google and you’ll see. I’ve picked out a few ‘interesting’ ones that you might like to visit…

(Click on the museum names to visit their websites).

The Dog Collar Museum

Copyright: Leeds Castle.

I absolutely had to include this museum! Leeds Castle (which is in Kent, not Leeds) has a unique collection of historic and fascinating dog collars that is now the largest of its kind on public display anywhere in the world.

The colossal collection of canine neckwear, spanning five centuries, is fun for children and adults alike. There are over 130 rare and valuable collars with the earliest dating back to the late 15th century – a Spanish iron herd mastiff’s collar, which would have been worn for protection against wolves and bears roaming Europe at the time.

Other collars range from 16th-century German iron collars with fearsome spikes to ornate gilt collars of the Baroque period, through to finely-chased nineteenth century silver collars and twentieth century examples fashioned from tyres, beads and plastic.

Museum of Witchcraft and Magic

Copyright: Museum of Witchcraft and Magic.

Located in the picturesque Cornish harbour of Boscastle, this museum was started in 1960 and is now one of the most visited museums in the Westcountry. It claims to have the world’s largest collection of items relating to witchcraft, magic and the occult. Exhibitions change regularly so there’s always something new to see. 2017 boasts an exhibition of ‘poppets, pins and power: the craft of cursing’, which sounds well worth a visit! Being in such a lovely coastal setting, there’s plenty to see and do as well as explore this mysterious museum.

The Bakelite Museum

Copyright: The Bakelite Museum, above, and main header.

Anyone who has clocked up their half century will have come across Bakelite! The first proper plastic, Bakelite was a revolutionary material. It enabled mass-production and was known as ‘the material of a thousand uses’ and, in various guises, was used by everybody. The museum is an enormous collection of vintage plastics, from the earliest experimental materials to 1970s kitsch. It includes Bakelite objects in a huge variety of shapes, colours and functions – radios, telephones, eggcups, musical instruments, toys, tie-presses and even a coffin. There are also domestic and work related things from the Bakelite era, mainly the 1920s to the 1950s, and the whole collection is a nostalgic treat, a vintage wonderland and an educational eye-opener.

The exhibits are displayed in an atmospheric 18th-century watermill, in the heart of the beautiful Somerset countryside between Taunton, Minehead and Bridgewater. Williton Station, on the West Somerset Railway, the longest stretch of restored steam railway in the country, is just a 20-minute walk away. They also serve Somerset cream teas – so what’s not to love about this museum as a great day out!

Gnome World

Copyright: Gnome Reserve.

Yes, really! This north Devon attraction promises ‘a completely unique 100% fun experience, simultaneously 100% ecologically interesting, with an extra 100% wonder and magic mixed in’.

Set between Bideford and Bude, the 1000+ gnomes and pixies reside in a lovely 4 acre-reserve, with woodland, stream, pond, meadow and garden. Visitors will be delighted to learn that gnome hats are loaned free of charge together with fishing rods and you are encouraged to embarrass the family with some truly memorable photos for the family album!

The House of Marbles

Copyright: House of Marbles.

I don’t know why most of these museums are in the Westcountry, I was looking nationwide… goodness knows what it says about those of us that live down here! Anyway, I absolutely must give a final mention to The House of Marbles, here in Bovey Tracey, Devon, owned by some old friends of mine. Whenever you look up unusual museums or great places to visit – the House of Marbles is up there at the top of the list. No less than three museums, an enormous marble run and the chance to see glass being blown, it’s a great place to visit whatever your age. Oh, and it also has a very popular restaurant and great shops!

Have fun!

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Hello Paris!

This is very apt, I feel, for Tina Dorr, our newsletter editor and long time member of the team. Tina has bravely (in my opinion, but then I am a bit wimpy!) bought a lovely home in France and is just starting her journey to moving over and transferring her life.

I think the good luck on the card may be needed. My brother lived and worked in France for many years and often bumped into their red tape, but it was all worth it, he felt, as the local people were lovely and the food and wine… well goes without saying!

So here’s hoping it will be a fabulous retirement home for you Tina and Aidan – life is about following your dreams and I know France is where you have wanted to be for very many years – here you go!

The card uses an image from our Helena Lam 6 x 6” cardmaking pad. If you haven’t tried any of the pads, do give one a go as they are so handy for getting a really lovely card together. The backing paper could be used from one of the Graphic 45 Cityscapes pads or ephemera – or any other Eiffel Tower images or postcards that you have.

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