A winter wonderland…

kjerstinmontage1
kjestenbasket2I love Christmas – I love the preparation, the decoration and the celebration! It is a wonderful opportunity for us crafters to create all sorts of fabulous things and I am always keen to see what new ideas or trends will appear each year alongside traditional decorations.

Everything Scandinavian is very ‘in’ at the moment, but it is such a magical winter wonderland, it is no surprise that they are the masters of cosy (yes, hygge again!) and of creating fabulous decorations from the plants and trees that thrive in such a cold landscape.

I follow a Facebook page that’s linked to Gardener’s World and someone whose posts regularly catch my eye is a lady called Kjerstin who lives in Norway. Her wooden house, built in 1919, looks like something out of a fairytale, and her garden is equally lovely, full of shape and colour even when the temperature has plummeted well below freezing.

kjerstincolourKjerstin has recently posted some great photos of the Christmas decorations and arrangements that she has created outside and she has very kindly said I can share them with you. The arrangements in urns and baskets are, Kjerstin said, simply stuck into soil, with branches the pushed well down.

I thought Kjerstin’s ideas might inspire us to come up with similar designs and, if you swap soil for oasis, many of her ideas would work well inside as well as out. I’d love to hear about your own Christmas decorating ideas, so please share!

Smiles, Joanna.

kjerstinmontage2

 

 

0 Comments

A Christmas cracker!

You can’t have Christmas dinner without Christmas crackers – well, that’s my view anyway! We groan at the awfulness of the mottos, we laugh at the pointlessness of the ‘gift’ and we feel silly wearing the paper hats… but it is a tradition and we stick to it every year.

In moments of great industriousness, I have made my own crackers and spent ages thinking of appropriate gifts and jokes to go inside. They always go down well, but they take a lot of planning.

This will be my first Christmas without my parents, Diana and John, so this year will be tinged with sadness for all the family. But Mummy’s enthusiasm for a traditional family Christmas is firmly entrenched with all of us and I shall be filling stockings, dressing the table and fussing about the sprouts just as always.

I love decorating the table, I think it makes such an impact with pretty napkins, candles and, of course, a special Christmas table centrepiece. I have produced so many over the years and always find myself getting excited as I add the finishing touches. If you don’t have a large table, you can still make it look lovely with a table runner ­– cheap enough to buy even in supermarkets these days – or run up one of your own very simply. Table sprinkles are also great fun and really do add a touch of glitz and sparkle… but you’ll be hoovering them up for weeks afterwards!

Returning to the Christmas cracker… did you know they were invented in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Thomas Smith? Rather unromantically, he devised the Christmas cracker as a money-making idea when bonbon sales slumped. They originally contained love messages and a sweet. The enterprising Mr Smith then went on to the snapping strip to replicate the sound of a crackling log fire!

1 Comment

DIY bird feeding station

I’ve just been watching a dear little robin through the window, head cocked, eyes bright – that’s the robin, not me! I always start to fret about the garden birds at this time of year as it gets colder.

I don’t know if it is significant, but I have never seen so many rowan berries as there have been this year, and also lots of holly berries… does that foretell of a bad winter or a mild one? Anyway, forearmed is forewarned and I recently saw this lovely idea for winter bird feeding, so I thought I’d share it with you…

The pine cone, beloved of crafters and flower arrangers everywhere, makes an excellent natural base for a bird feeder. Its open structure is just asking to be stuffed full of titbits for our feathered friends.

  1. Begin by collecting some medium to large pine cones. Don’t worry if they are tightly closed as, once you bring them indoors, they will open. If they are bit reluctant, give them a short warm in the oven.
  1. Attach string to the top of the cone ready to hang it up.
  1. Now, the world is your oyster, or indeed your pine cone! You may want to put rubber gloves on at this point as it gets messy… Spread suet, fat or even peanut butter over the cone, making sure you get it into the gaps between the scales and cover the whole thing.
  1. Place a mix of birdseed on a tray and roll your sticky pine cone until well coated. If you go for a general bird mix, you’ll attract a variety of birds. You could make several pine cone feeding stations and roll others in specific seeds, such as niger for example and you should attract that beautiful, colourful little bird, the goldfinch.
  1. Put your bird feeders in the fridge for an hour or so to make everything set.
  1. Finally, hang your masterpiece in a secluded area of your garden close enough to a hedge or shrub to give a safe haven for the birds if need be, but not somewhere that is likely to help any passing cats get at the birds!
4 Comments

Heart-warming hygge

jo4sm

I have to say, this is my idea of hygge! Hidden away in a corner of the lounge in a nice warm wooly jumper, a comfy chair and a book!

I keep seeing the word ‘hygge’ and wondering not only what it is, but also how on earth you say it!

Apparently, it is pronounced “hoo-ga” and is a Danish word that is a feeling that comes from taking genuine pleasure in making ordinary, every day things more meaningful, beautiful or special. I think as crafters, we can probably all identify with that sentiment!

Hygge is usually translated into English as ‘cosiness’. But it’s much more than that, apparently, and is an entire attitude to life that helps Denmark to vie with Switzerland and Iceland to be the world’s happiest country.

With up to 17 hours of darkness per day in the depths of winter, and average temperatures hovering around zero ºC, Danes spend a great deal of time indoors and, as a result, there’s greater focus on home entertaining. The idea is to relax and feel as at-home as possible, forgetting life’s worries. Sounds jolly good!

From what I have read, hygge seems to be about being kind to yourself – indulging, having a nice time, not punishing or denying yourself anything. All very useful come January when in the UK everyone’s on diets or manically exercising or abstaining from alcohol!

Apparently, the Danes are kinder to themselves and to each other. They don’t binge then purge and there’s not much yo-yo dieting in Denmark. No wonder they’re happier than we are back in dear old Blighty!

Certainly, everyone seems to be talking about hygge in the UK even though there isn’t an English word that means the same. It sounds a little like the English word ‘hug’, for which the Oxford English Dictionary lists no origins. You could argue that the effect of hygge and a hug is similar – comforting and secure. An obsolete meaning of hug is ‘to cherish oneself, to keep or make oneself snug”, according to the OED.

Hygge comes from a Norwegian word meaning ‘wellbeing’ and it first appeared in Danish writing in the 19th Century and has since evolved into the cultural idea known in Denmark today. Some older Danes feel that hygge isn’t what it used to be, as the stress on socialising has lessened. It’s now generally considered hyggeligt to watch TV alone or watching a DVD set, perhaps while eating crisps. Oh dear, a sign of the times even for the cosy Danes then…

And so, perhaps it’s safest to say that hygge was never meant to be translated – it was meant to be felt. I shall be attempting to feel some hygge this weekend – enjoy!

 

0 Comments

Sleep on it…

Humans, like all animals, need sleep to survive. For we humans, sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. I am always amazed when I read that we spend up to one-third of our lives asleep!

Most of us know that getting a good night’s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours tucked up in bed a priority. To make matters worse in today’s busy world, stimulants like coffee and energy drinks, alarm clocks, and external lights—including those from electronic devices—interfere with our ‘circadian rhythm’ or natural sleep/wake cycle. And then of course… there’s our old friend stress, perfect for inducing insomnia!

Anyone who has woken up at 3am, eyes wide and mind racing, knows how difficult it is to get back to sleep or, as affects many people, getting to sleep in the first place! I know when I’ve been going through stressful times, I tend to fall into the ‘middle of the night wake up’ category, which can be utterly exhausting.

There are, however, lots of things you can do to ease your passage into a restful sleep, so here are five suggestions you might find helpful.

Music
Small children invariably fall asleep to the sound of a lullaby and adults can do the same thing too. With modern technology, falling asleep to soothing tunes or the sounds of nature (I love the sound of waves on a beach) is not difficult to organise through smart phones or even a special pillow with built-in speakers!

Essential oils
I have written a lot about essential oils over the years, and they are really not to be under estimated. Chamomile, marjoram and, of course, lavender are all known to help relaxation. Sprinkle a few drops in a bath before bed (the post-bath drop in temperature is also sleep-inducing) or onto your pillow, I find lavender especially soothing.

Bed socks rule
If cold feet are keeping you awake—especially during the winter—warm them up with a soft pair of socks. The extra layer under the covers can help improve circulation in your extremities, which can help you fall asleep more quickly.

A good book!
I don’t know if my novels send people to sleep (probably!!) but reading, or listening to an audiobook is a great way to help you nod off.

Country air
Well actually, it can be country air or sea air for me, but the important thing is clean air and a bracing walk! I can guarantee it will make me feel tired in a really lovely wooly way… if you know what I mean!

 

0 Comments