Whisky and Orange Marmalade

I am sure this really ought to be orange and whisky marmalade but it sounded so much more exciting this way round! We have had a slight dilemma recently as my late stepfather was too gentle and polite to tell us that he had virtually stopped drinking whisky and so, every time he was given yet another bottle by the children or grandchildren, he would hide it away in a cupboard! So we recently discovered eight bottles of Johnny Walker in the cupboard in their bedroom!

Now Richard is manfully trying to help and not waste it (yeah, right,Richard!) but as we are both trying to diet and improve our health, it will be a very long time before we wade through that many bottles. So I started looking around for recipes that would incorporate the whisky without being foolish with it. I found this one on the BBC Good Food site so a big ‘thank you’ to them! This marmalade is delicious and, of course, you could use different alcohol – Cointreau sounds good. I also wondered about swapping the fruit and perhaps trying Satsumas?

Ingredients
This makes about 10 one pound jars so you could halve the amounts

  • 1.3kg Seville oranges
  • 2 lemons, juice only
  • 2 ¼ kg granulated or preserving sugar
  • 450g dark muscovado sugar
  • 150ml whisky

Method
1. Place the whole oranges and lemon juice in a large preserving pan and cover with 2 litres (4 pints) water. If this is not enough to cover the fruit, put it in a smaller pan. If necessary, weight the oranges with a heat-proof plate to keep them under the water. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer very gently for about 2 hours, or until the peel can be pierced easily with a fork.

2. Warm half of the white and dark sugar in a very low oven. Pour off the cooking water from the oranges into a jug and tip the oranges into a bowl. Return the cooking liquid to the pan. Leave the oranges to cool until they are easy to handle, then cut them in half. Scoop out all the pips and pith and add these to reserved orange liquid in the pan. Bring to the boil for 6 minutes then strain this liquid through a sieve into a bowl, pressing the pulp through with a wooden spoon; the result is high in pectin, which helps to ensure the marmalade has a good set.

3. Pour half this liquid into a preserving pan. Cut the peel into chunky shreds, using a sharp knife. Add half the peel to the liquid in the preserving pan with the warm white and dark muscovado sugars. Stir over a low heat until all the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil and bubble rapidly for 15-25 minutes until setting point is reached. Stir in half the whisky.

4. Take the pan off the heat and skim any scum from the surface. (To dissolve any excess scum, drop a small knob of butter on the surface, and gently stir.) Leave the marmalade to stand in the pan for 20 minutes to cool a little and to allow the peel to settle, then pot in sterilised jars, seal and label. Repeat for the remaining batch.

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Vegetable garden update!

Top to bottom: New little seedlings, fabulous kale, reliable rosemary and beautiful bay!I was so inspired by the few veggies we grew last year that I decided we would expand production a little this season. We have invested in some plastic cloches – not the fabulous glass Victorian bells I would have liked, but hey this veg growing lark has to have a budget! About a week ago we planted out the little raised beds under the cloches and as you can just see from the photo – baby plants are just appearing. So far we have radishes (a real favourite of mine), rocket, assorted salad leaves and exotic salad leaves.

We are bravely attempting to dig a large potato and carrot bed further down the garden as again these are veggies we eat often. Regarding less popular greens in this household(!) the kale I have just picked looks amazing in this photo doesn’t it? Well I thoroughly enjoyed it – lightly steamed and very yummy. Richard however ate it dutifully and tried to smile when I said let’s plant that again this year … I think we might skip that one! I failed somewhat with the cauliflowers and sprouting broccoli too so will probably skip brassicas altogether for now.

The other things I like growing in abundance are herbs. Hurray for all year round rosemary (due for a haircut to be used with Easter Sunday’s lamb) and my lovely little bay trees. The strange black wires you can see within the bay foliage are because I have solar powered twinkling lights wound through all the bay trees on the patio and very pretty they look too. My mint is sprouting nicely, as is the thyme and I noticed this morning my alpine strawberries (Grace’s favourite in the garden) are looking very happy too.

As you can see from my little one metre square raised beds on the patio… you don’t need tons of space to grow at least something. My next project is to sort out some really nice tomatoes… watch this space!

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The Mystery of Mrs Beeton…

I was having a sort through my many (far too many!) cookery books last weekend and I came across a copy of ‘Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management’ first published back in1861. The name Mrs Beeton is still widely known and referred to over 150 years later. The book is still in print today.

But what do most people know about Mrs Beeton? Until I read a recent biography of her by Kathryn Hughes, I’d imagined Mrs Beeton was an elderly Victorian lady who recorded recipes and household tips gleaned through decades of running a thoroughly organised family home. But nothing could be further from the truth.

Born Isabella Mayson, she was an English journalist and editor who married Samuel Beeton, an ambitious publisher and magazine editor. In 1857, less than a year after their wedding, Isabella began writing for one of her husband’s publications, ‘The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine’. She translated French fiction and wrote the cookery column, though all the recipes were actually plagiarised from other works or sent in by the magazine’s readers!

In 1859, the Beetons launched a series of monthly supplements to ‘The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine’. These 24 instalments were published in one volume as ‘Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management’ in October 1861. It sold 60,000 copies in the first year alone and was one of the major publishing events of the nineteenth century. Of the 1112 pages, over 900 contained recipes. The remainder provided advice on fashion, childcare, animal husbandry, poisons, the management of servants, science, religion, first aid and the importance in the use of local and seasonal produce.

Isabella was working on an abridged version of her book, which was to be titled ‘The Dictionary of Every-Day Cookery’, when she died of puerperal fever in February 1865 at the age of just 28. As well as producing an incredible amount of published works, in her tragically short life, she gave birth to four children, two of whom died in infancy, and had several miscarriages.

Her name is firmly linked with knowledge and authority on Victorian cooking and home management, and the Oxford English Dictionary states that by 1891 the term ‘Mrs Beeton’ had become a generic name for a domestic authority. She is also considered a strong influence in the shaping of a middle-class identity of the Victorian era. What an amazing legacy for a woman who died so young.

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Make it seasonal, take it slowly and keep it small!

© thenaturalweddingcompany.co.ukThese days many people’s only experience of British cut flowers is a bunch of spring daffodils grown in Cornwall. Just as I reported in my recent blogs about vegetable growing – subsidies and supermarkets have almost killed off yet another home-grown industry – the British flower producers.

It’s a difficult time for British flower farmers who are having the same problems as dairy farmers where cheap imports push down market prices so that production becomes unviable. It is estimated that 80% of our cut flower industry has gone in the last 30 years. What a horribly familiar story…

How has this come about? In the mid 20th century, huge subsidies were made available for research and development in the Netherlands and the booming Dutch flower industry was created. Improved transport links meant that these cheap flowers could quickly arrive in the UK and British florists were keen to get hold of these cheaper and more reliable flowers.

By the 1990s the UK supermarket chains dominated the cut flower market and their aggressive buying policies and huge purchasing power really made it impossible for British flower growers to compete.

Thankfully, our farmers and small-scale growers are resourceful types and have been able to see an opportunity in the market when customers start to want to know the provenance of their cut flowers as much as they do their food – it’s heritage veg time again! Thankfully, there is also a move back to more traditional weddings where brides and grooms want something a little different to big bunches of blowsy hot house grown and imported flowers.

Similar to the Slow Food movement there is now a band of Slow Flower producers and marketeers in the UK who see the internet, particularly social media, and attendance at special wedding and country fairs as their ©BareBloomsshop front rather than the established supermarket or garage forecourt. Brilliant!

Seasonality is so important in so many areas of life and I do wish we could all slow down and say ‘Hang on a minute! Do we have to have the brightest, the best and biggest of everything all the time?’ Let’s have a bit of subtly every now and then. One of the really rewarding challenges of using native grown flowers is that you have to work with the seasons. It might mean that couples can’t specify an exact shade of rose, but they will get exciting and fresh, and a palette to reflect the season. What could be better? And slowly, slowly… people are wanting this more. It is a similar trend to restaurants offering smaller menus with a greater emphasis on local and even foraged seasonal ingredients.

And of course as we know, a flower arrangement does not just have to be about cut blooms. Arrangements can be enhanced with greenery or branches, such as willow. An addition of some herbs, particularly rosemary, can produce wonderful aromas as well as structure.

Let’s hear it for our gorgeous native flower industry!

 

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More food fun…!

Top to bottom: Sally Lunn Bun, Cornish Hevva Cake, Bath Chaps and Spotted Dick.Following on from an earlier blog, here are some more foods with funny names… childish, me…?!

The Sally Lunn Bun
In the 17th century, the ‘Sally Lunn bun’ became synonymous with the fashionable city of Bath. ‘Sally’ is thought to have been a Frenchwoman named Solange Luyon but, thanks to her colleagues’ poor French, when the bun became a popular delicacy in Georgian times it was mispronounced and became known as the Sally Lunn bun. 

However, as is often the way… there is disagreement over the name’s origin. A similar French breakfast cake known as a ‘solei et lune’ (it being golden on top like the sun and pale on the bottom like the moon) gave rise to the suggestion that the baker could have been crying “Sol et lune! Solei lune!” in her French accent and passers-by misheard it as ‘Sally Lunn’. I quite like both of these explanations.

Cornish Hevva Cake
Cornish hevva cake, also known as heavy cake, is a simple cake associated with the pilchard fishing industry. It is said that when fisherman hauled aboard a pilchard shoal they would cry “hevva” to let their wives know to start baking the hevva cake. Its history is reflected in the diagonal lines scored across its top before it goes in the oven so it comes out looking like a fishing net. I can well imagine them all shouting ‘heave’ as they toiled away, but I guess the ‘hevva’ story is altogether more interesting!

Bath Chaps
Bath Chaps are the lower portion of a long-jawed pig’s cheeks and sometimes part of the tongue, pickled and boiled, skinned and rolled in breadcrumbs. The word ‘chap’ is a variant of ‘chop’ that, in the 16th century, meant an animal’s jaws and cheeks. They were very much a West Country delicacy and may well have been delicious, but are probably a little too graphic-sounding for many of us today!

Spotted Dick
Well, I suppose I had to finish off with this one! The ‘spotted’ part is due to the raisins or currants studded all over the pudding. The word ‘dick’ is said to have denoted a plain pudding and could be a shortening of pudding to ‘ding’, which then became ‘dick’. Amazing how words and phrases change over time!

 

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