Happy Retirement!

Well, what I wonder is retirement these days? I suspect for me it will be something that may happen when I am too weak and feeble to lift an ink pad or fold a piece of card! However, some slightly more sensible people take time in their later years to relax, retire and either stay at home, move home, travel or take up new interests.

Having just had my 65thbirthday this weekend I am thinking back to when my mother and father were 65 and they moved down here to Devon to live a few houses away from us. For the next few years, they helped with parts of the business that they enjoyed (my mother made wondrous apple pies and homemade cakes), and they took nice breaks away and enjoyed their respective cooking and gardening pursuits.

If you have friends that are planning to retire or are newly retired, they too may opt for different retirement choices and choosing what to put on a card can range from Yay! No more work – to congratulating them on a move to a new house or perhaps celebrating the fact they are starting a brand new venture. Anything is possible at any age these days and just as we have entrepreneurs that are 14, so we can have successful new businesses started by 65-85 years olds!

These cards use the Bungalow and the Tudor Cottage from our recent range that combines all year round houses with Christmas as an extra. So you can utilise the dies with or without the snowy decorations!

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Christmas abroad

I am very keen on my traditional British Christmas – from stockings and trees to families and board games.
So how, I wonder, will any of our friends and family members who are living abroad be celebrating, probably in sweltering heat and beautiful sunshine.

My younger daughter will (I desperately hope) be given leave to come home for a few days, so I won’t have to ponder how Christmas Day is spent in Singapore. However one of the ladies that work here, now has two daughters living in Australia. I understand there will be much barbecuing, swimming and happy celebrating and they reckon Christmas is just as fun as in the UK.

I do contemplate the idea of a Christmas holiday somewhere hot like the Caribbean – may be a luxury cruise so I don’t have to cook – but I always end up shaking my head and muttering, “Nope, home is best!”

For anyone that has family or friends living far, far away, here are a couple of ideas for cards and remember it’s really early for the last posting date!

Smiles Joanna

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Heather and gorse – moorland beauties

From a distance, Dartmoor can seem rather gloomy and forbidding as Autumn draws in, but pause to look closer, and you’ll see that it is carpeted in the most lovely shades of purple, pink and yellow as heather and gorse combine to create a stunning patchwork.

Heather is also known as ‘Ling’ and you’ll find it on heathland, moorland, bogs and even woodland with acidic or peat soils. Its delicate pink flowers appear from August to October with the plants growing tightly packed together. Surprisingly, given the tough areas they seem to thrive in, heathers can live for up to 40 years or more!

Historically, heather has been used for many purposes, such as fuel, fodder, building materials, thatch, packing and ropes. It was also used to make brooms, which is how it got its Latin name – Callunais derived from the Greek word meaning ‘to brush’.

People have lived and worked on Dartmoor for thousands of years and managed the vegetation to produce what they need. Swaling (or burning) has been carried out by farmers from earliest times, as a way to clear scrub and improve grazing for sheep, cattle and ponies. Today, laws and regulations stipulate the time of year and even the time of day that swaling can take place – so very different from times gone by. An old farmer friend of mine recalls being sent out with a box of matches to swale nearby moorland with three friends, the oldest being 12 and the farmer himself 5! He said they did it every year without mishap and their parents trusted them to get on with the job, it wasn’t a game, and they all knew how to manage the burn – quite extraordinary!

The other star of the moorland landscape is gorse. Its vivid yellow flowers create a real splash of colour and, although I wouldn’t normally think to put pink and yellow together, in nature they look stunning against the dark green foliage. Gorse is a prickly character and can leave you with scratched legs should you walk through it, even in thick walking trousers!

Common Gorse can be seen in all kinds of habitats, from heaths and coastal grasslands to towns and gardens. Western Gorse, which is abundant on Dartmoor, flowers from July to November. Gorse provides shelter and food for many insects and birds, it’s spiky leaves creating an effective deterrent for even the nosiest dogs!

Traditionally, gorse was regularly collected from common land and, like heather, had all sorts of uses – including fuel for firing bread ovens, fodder for livestock and was used as a dye for painting Easter Eggs.

Common Gorse flowers a little in late autumn and through the winter, coming into flower most strongly in spring, while Western Gorse and Dwarf Gorse flower in Autumn. Between the different species, some gorse is almost always in flower, hence the old country phrase: “When gorse is out of blossom, kissing’s out of fashion”!

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A Nostalgic Christmas

Kevin Walsh Nostalgia Collection 8 x 8 Cardmaking Pad - Christmas Collection Vol. 1

I hope those of you that caught my shows on Create and Craft last Thursday enjoyed the samples and demos. Some of my favourite items on the show were the Kevin Walsh Nostalgia Christmas cardmaking pads volumes 1 and 2.

I love Kevin’s nostalgic look at Britain – in some cases childhood memories and then some older views and scenes. I always feel Christmas itself makes me nostalgic for childhood times, so these fit very well with the feelings I already get around that time.

The great thing about the cardmaking pads is that they include the useful extras like borders and sentiments, some decoupage options and even some little pictures that look cute on the back of the card.

The other component of the pads is the selection of backing papers to coordinate with the images and some – for example, the brick wall – are super handy with many other images too!

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Family Christmas cards

One of the things I enjoy most about receiving cards in the run-up to Christmas is the addition (hopefully) of up to date photos of my nephews and nieces, cousins and friends’ children. It’s just great to see their little smiling faces and it reminds me that Christmas is so much about family and friends.

This is a sample from my new cardmaking collection from Practical Publishing. The boxed set features one of our favourite artists – Jane Shasky. Her pads and CDs have sold in their thousands for us and she is a special favourite of mine.

The full steps are in the magazine that comes in the collection as are all the ingredients – oh yes, apart from the picture of little Grace! Obviously, you must insert one of your own special people, whether they are young, old or just middling!

 

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