Creative chaos or just a mess?

As we all know on this blog, crafters are all pretty wonderful people! Of course, we are all different in what we like and don’t like and how we approach things. In our work, some of us are tidy and some of us messy. Does it matter if you have everything neatly stored and colour coordinated… or your desk (like mine!) is an eruption of colours and bits and pieces? The general view always seems to be that tidy is best. Well, hang on, there’s some good news for those of us on the messy end of the scale – I’ve just read that there is growing evidence that being tidy can actually hamper your creativity!

My desk, just now!

Being messy has its plus points. Messy can be read as ‘interesting’. If you stick to a strict regimen, you may well get lots done, but is what you produce any good, or original? A horrible term ‘thinking outside the box’ is, I think, meant to encourage you to look at things from a different, perhaps quirky angle. In a recent blog, I wrote about making the most of your dies and using them in different ways from how they were originally intended. It seems obvious, but sometimes, you just have to stand back a bit and let your mind wander… yes, I know, mine wanders a lot!

I think most of us would own up to having too much ‘stuff’ in our lives and can spend a lot of time trying to ‘de-clutter’. Just have a look at top-selling books on Amazon and you’ll see there’s a whole industry in it! But if you go too far the other way, that empty minimalist way of living can be too restricting. There’s nothing less inspiring than an empty wall.

Some really creative and clever people had chaotic desks. Asked to name a brainy person and many of us would come up with Einstein. I am pleased to report he had a fantastically messy desk! So too, apparently, does the domestic goddess Nigella Lawson, so there’s hope for us all.

The theory seems to be that a messy and chaotic approach to work and creativity often leads to a fresh way of thinking. There’s been lots of research done that proves that messy=creative. How many artists’ studios have you ever seen that are tidy?

Unfortunately, the idea that ‘messy is bad’ is taught to us from a very early age. But surely, being allowed to make a mess has to be a good thing if that is how you prefer to live or work. Trying to force yourself to be tidy cannot be a good way to live – how are you going to express yourself? And let’s face it; most children are happiest when they are allowed to make a mess!

Life is a messy business. So much of my ‘clutter’ is actually my ‘happy memory’ bank – photos of my parents, my granddaughter’s artworks, a shell I picked up on a far way beach… and so it goes on. As a fellow crafter, I am sure you know just what I mean. Enjoy your mess! Smiles, Joanna

 

 

 

 

 

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Is it a beach hut… or a shed?

I decided to do a blog about this card today to underline the flexibility of dies. Technically this is sold as a beach hut, (see my previous blog!) and very popular it is too, but I loved the use of it as a plain old garden shed. It fascinates me how a different paint job or colouring treatment or however you like to look at it, can turn it into something quite different.

I was reading an article the other day about ‘Man caves’ and thought how nice it must be for a husband to be able to choose everything without female input and have a little world that is completely his own. I offered Richard a shed down the garden and his response was: “What’s wrong with the garden shed we have now, it’s not full yet?” OK, he obviously doesn’t feel he needs a man cave, but time will tell!

However, in tandem with that article was one about ‘She sheds’ and it occurred to me how lovely it would be to have, say, a fairy garden interior, or whatever your favourite dream place is. I’m not sure if I have the time to do anything for now, but I do know I will be exploring the lovely ‘fairy door’ idea for spots in the garden to make sure Grace grows up with the same love of fairies and gardens as I have… Watch this space on the website is all I will say!

To go back to this card, the image was from ‘One Summer’s Day’ CD which features artwork by an American lady called Barbara Mock – such lovely designs on there, I do enjoy using it.

So how about a man’s card with a shed on it, or a card for a keen gardener with the door of the shed opening to have tools spilling out? So why not have a look at all your dies and ponder alternative uses for them!

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Keys to the Beach Hut!

Sadly, we don’t all have a fabulous little beach hut, but we do all need to keep keys somewhere! One of the best things about being a crafter is that our stash can be used for so many different things. Cardmaking, home decorations, scrapbooking, gift making and just plain old playtime for us!

This is a lovely example of two of those categories, you could make something like this as a gift or just to decorate your home. We all need somewhere to put those dratted keys (the ones I lose all the time), and hanging them on a pretty little set of hooks like this is very pleasing! I have a lovely big wooden key with hooks along it in my home, that was made for me by my baby brother when he was at school… um, quite upsetting to remember he has long since had his 50th birthday and runs a very successful pub in Crickhowell in Wales (The Kestrel Inn – I highly recommend the food!) but the key holder is still in place, hand made gifts mean a lot.

You can use MDF as a base or thin plywood or even a piece of thicker wood if you have easier access to that. Get drilling first and make some holes for the string – some chunky rough string looks good. Then start your choice of paint effect. This has been crackled with Weathered Wood – but you could do nice straight stripes or just paint it plain white, or blue or whatever you like.

Once the paint is dry, screw in the cup hooks at the bottom and die cut and colour your beach huts. If you want to make them more serviceable, you could add a layer of matt or glossy varnish or laminate them to make them stronger. Now add them to the plaque together with the seagulls using trusty Pinflair. Use a fair sized blob to make sure you have some height.

Thread the string through and knot – and away you go. This same idea could be utilised with so many different dies and designs.

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My favourite Thomas Kinkade cards

We make gadzillions of cards through the year. Some are destined to be samples or demos for Create and Craft, some are just for family and friends. But these two cards are among my favourites and I have kept them carefully for months now. You know what it’s like when you have cards that should go somewhere or be for a particular someone and you think, no, I’ll keep those for now… and then never give them away!

Thomas Kinkade images are easy to use as the cottages are gentle and rural, pretty and easy to match colour-wise. The die used here is our Signature die Wild Rose (completely biased now) – and it is one of our best sellers of all time. I just LOVE it.

My personal choice is to die cut in white and then colour with Promarkers, or you can use any colouring medium that you prefer. You can add pearls, or not add pearls, ring the changes and it makes any card look fabulous with very limited effort!

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With Love from Japan

I have a mass of beautiful and happy memories of visiting Japan, and of my friends over there, that are all part of the Joanna Sheen Pressed Flower School. I went over every year for about ten years back in the 1990s and it is a truly amazing country to see. The temples, the cherry blossom, the artworks, the happy people and the very beautiful flowers – in fact, all things ‘flowery’ that I discovered while over there – combine to create a fabulous store of memories for me.

I am always happy to use anything oriental in a card and when I discovered the artwork of Haruyo Morita, I was spellbound – such gorgeous feminine images! Have a quick flip through the pages on the website to see what I mean.

This card is a simple use of one page of the pad (got to love our pads!). You could use any die cut border you have in stock, some pastel backing paper (which you need to antique a little with a Distress pad perhaps?) a little scrap of ribbon and yes, the Haruyo Morita paper pad.

I have included some photos here of a class I was teaching back in the 90s – and a picture I made with orchids – in truth the orchids weren’t from Japan, but a bouquet sent to me by my brother when he lived in Singapore. In those days any flowers bought for me were doomed to instant preservation and were snipped to pieces and pressed within a few hours of arriving!

And can I just say – no rude comments please about my mop of unruly dark curly hair – I thought it looked the bee’s knees in those days – ahh how tastes change in 25 years!

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