Here be Pixies!

Did you know we have pixies down here on Dartmoor…? Little people, or ‘Piskies’ as they are usually referred to, that stand no higher than your knee and live among the rocks and combes.

Numerous places are traditionally connected with their revels, one of the best known being beside the River Dart near New Bridge where grassy banks make a delightful picnic place for folk large and small.

Old stories often relate that pixies helped farmers by threshing corn, churning butter and keeping cupboards free of cobwebs, especially if a dish of cream was left on the hearth as a reward although their good deeds would stop if they suspected they were being spied on.

Dartmoor’s numerous rock formations shelter many a cleft and cave and one particular cave has long been associated with the little folk. Known as Piskies’ Holt, it stands on private ground at Huccaby Cleave. Sadly, today it’s out of bounds to anyone without a fishing licence but this was once a popular place where children would leave a shell, a pin or a piece of cloth as presents for the pixies. I read an article a recently where the writer had been given permission to visit the spot and there, on a rock shelf in the cave lay an array of tiny offerings, some obviously recent! The spooky, but beautiful, Wistmans Wood of stunted oaks on Dartmoor, home to many a pixie, surely…?

Piskies are not only found on Dartmoor there are stories from around the world relating to the ‘little people’. In Cornwall they are known as pisgies, in Somerset they are pixies and in Dorset they are called pexies. It has been suggested that in early times they were all fairies but in the West Country they separated off to become piskies, pisgies, pixies or pexies.

There are many ideas as to how piskies originated. It may be that the piskies are pagan spirits who because of their beliefs are unable to enter the kingdom of heaven. Or, more likely, they are early Christian inventions used to discourage people from worshiping their banished pagan gods.

Whatever the truth behind these little folk, the myth lives on and there are still people today up on the moor who will tell you they have seen them. I haven’t been so lucky, but you never know…!

Are there tales of ‘little people’ where you live? We’d love to hear your stories!

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