It’s all in the detail…

It’s all in the detail…Jayne Netley Mayhew is a wonderfully talented artist who first wielded a paintbrush at the tender age of two! All her siblings are artists too and Jayne has gone on to establish a reputation as a first-class wildlife artist and embroidery designer. She has produced a wide range of designs for Joanna Sheen Ltd over the years and her work is always immensely popular. We had a chat with Jayne to find out a bit more about the lady behind the paintbrush…

I think most people would say ‘Exquisite detail’ when they think of Jayne’s work. When she paints animals – big cats being her absolute favourite subject – she paints them hair by hair. “I just love detail!” she says. “If I have to paint a landscape, there has to be something detailed in the foreground or I just couldn’t take it on.”

She paints from real life as much as she can and when this isn’t possible, from photographs that her husband, Ian, takes for her. Jayne at work in her studio in Widecombe-in-the-Moor.

A great animal lover, Jayne has two huge pet dogs – Henry, a Newfoundland, and Dennis a Bernese Mountain Dog collie cross – that share Jayne and Ian’s home in Widecombe-in-the-Moor, in the heart of Dartmoor. She also keeps hens that she finds endlessly fascinating to watch and paint as they roam free-range in her garden. 

“Again, it’s all about the detail,” she says. Look at one of her chicken paintings and you can see every feather individually painted.

Jayne is unusual in that she works across a wide range of different media and is equally skilled in all of them. She was originally trained in oils by a local artist who gave Jayne, and her older brother an excellent grounding in painting. Next, she took up freehand embroidery and thrived on the incredibly detailed stitch work. Publishers David & Charles snapped Jayne up and suggested she’d like to look at developing cross stitch patterns for them. Sid the cockerel immortalised in watercolour.“I found these very easy to design, but drawing all the crosses by hand was really hard work but then, luckily, in came computers and it became a breeze!”

Today, Jayne works in acrylic, watercolour, pencil, pen and ink and pastels using whatever best suits her subject matter be it flora or fauna, big cat or new born chick. “Watercolour was a tricky technique to master as it is so unforgiving. With oil and acrylic you can over paint, but with watercolour it has to be perfect from the outset. I adore the subtlety and, of course, the detail that I can achieve with it,” said Jayne.

Always looking for something new to try, she has recently acquired a felting machine and is busily creating pictures with fibre and wool. “It’s a technique I am really enjoying experimenting with and I’ve been working on some miniatures, it’s really exciting.”

Look closely – very closely – at any Jayne Netley Mayhew painting and you will eventually find a ladybird hidden somewhere within the design. Jayne laughs: “It’s quite funny watching people look at my work as they usually This stunning tiger is created using felt, fibre and wool.peer at it very close up, and then say ‘Aha!’ and I know they’ve found the ladybird. Only then do they stand back and appreciate the painting properly.”

So it seems it’s all in the detail for Jayne’s fans, just as much as it is for her…

To find out more about Jayne and her work on her website.

2 Comments

Hearts of stone…?

I love using aerosol paints and paint finishes – so quick and easy (usually) assuming all goes well! We sell these lovely MDF heart shapes and I thought it would be fun to make them look as though they were made from a totally different material. A spray can of stone effect paint is available at any of the large DIY stores.

I would advise against spraying out in the garden with a dog nearby (can’t think why I would say that!) and take care that you don’t choose a windy day either – but it’s nice and quick to coat the heart on the front – leave it to dry (several hours) and then spray the back too so it looks neat and tidy. It’s really effective and the hearts look as if they should be really weighty.

Once you have a sprayed heart it’s easy to choose something to decorate it with. You could use paper sentiments from a CD or printed card kit that you have. Bits and pieces from some pot-pourri as I have used here, or some rosebuds or lavender, ribbons and other embellishments – or of course, it could be time to go foraging!

Tie some pretty ribbon through the holes to hang your heart – and hey presto you have a unique and pretty little gift!

12 Comments

Pots of fun!

We’ve enjoyed some lovely spring days this week down here in Devon and, ever keen to get into the garden, I’ve been spring cleaning my garden pots and planters.

As I sorted through them I thought I’d like to ring the changes a bit but, as we are all watching the pennies these days, I thought rather than buy new, I’d spruce up what I’ve got with some stencilling.

Terracotta is a lovely, warm material and I do love having a selection of pots in different shapes and sizes. Oil-based stencil paints show up very well on unglazed terracotta. The only drawback is the depth of colour in terracotta that will show through the paint colour – but you can use that to your advantage and allow for it in your design. You’ll end up with a more natural, earthy look, which is very attractive, rather than something too bright and vibrant.

Large terracotta planters and containers that you want to use outside will need some all weather protection. Because painting varnish directly on to a design with a brush could cause smudges, I recommend using two coats of a spray varnish over the stencilled design first, before covering the whole pot with yacht varnish or another finish suitable for outdoor use.

You will need:

  • Plain terracotta pots
  • Stencil templates – I’ve used a heart-shaped one
  • Oil-based stencilling sticks in colours of your choice – go for fairly strong colours to show up against the terracotta
  • Size 2 and 4 stencilling brushes
  • Glass palette
  • Satin or matt aerosol spray varnish
  1. Using your first colour and holding the stencil firmly with your non-painting hand, stencil a few hearts randomly on the flowerpot.
  2. With your second colour, using the same heart stencil, add some more hearts to you pot, overlapping slightly. Or, you could keep them separate, or perhaps create a band of hearts around the top and bottom of the pot – the choice is yours.
  3. Taking your third colour, continue stencilling and add some more hearts. Gold and silver paints give a lovely effect.
  4. Give the flowerpot a good coat of spray varnish. If you want to make it weatherproof for outdoor use, give it another coat of spray varnish once the first has dried and then finish off with several coats of thicker out door varnish.

Of course you can use all sorts of stencils to create very different effects, it’s great fun and easy to do. Decorated flowerpots make a very attractive gift too.

And you don’t have to stop at pots, you can decorate other terracotta objects, such as kitchen storage jars and crockery in just the same way If the objects are to be used in the kitchen, they should be varnished to protect the design against the damaging effects of grease and dust.

Have fun!

 

4 Comments