Buttons, buttons and more buttons…

My memories of my grandmother and mother are of two very resourceful women that used and reused everything. Recycling is so ‘trendy’ now but honestly, it’s nothing new, is it? Can anyone else remember Christmas or birthday present being unwrapped carefully and the paper being whizzed away by an adult as they ironed it and reused it on another occasion?

Buttons and zips were another part of unwanted clothing that would never have been wasted, Granny had a sewing treasure trove with pre-loved (another trendy word) zips, hooks and eyes, buttons and the old favourite… school name tapes. There had to be an economy there too. The eldest child had a full name tape with both Christian name and surname, second child had new but with the Christian name cut off so just the surname was used and then poor old third child had just the surname carefully unpicked from older sibling’s clothing, so even less in the way of borders at each end. I was the eldest by the way so – ha ha ha – I got first and last names!

I would love to say that I am currently just as thrifty and take care of all the treasures handed down to me – but I’m sorry I don’t. Replace a zip …. Nope …. Sew on a button yes, maybe, but recycle hooks and eyes? Not on your nelly.

However, I have found a very happy use for some of the treasures – I add them as embellishments to cards.  Whether you like making vintage style (me, me!) cards or prefer a more contemporary slant to your creativity – buttons can still make great additions. Bright primary coloured plain buttons look fun on modern style cards – and the smaller pearly buttons look great on a vintage card – so keep saving and keep recycling, even if it is in 21stcentury style!

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Grand Prix and vintage cars

It is true that these cards are not really pictures of anything remotely suitable for today’s Grand Prix races, but aren’t they lovely and vintage!

I was thinking about these images as I was watching the race from Bahrain at the weekend as Richard is a massive Formula 1 fan. We have joined some friends in a fantasy F1 competition for the past two or three years – and last year to my absolute delight, I a lone female amongst the males, actually won, and not only won our competition but placed nationally amongst F1 fans playing the game – ha ha! If you listen to Richard he would say just pure luck – I would say no, it was carefully studied form, enthusiastic attention paid to all the Sky Sports programmes we watch… well, OK, maybe it was a bit of luck… But it’s fun to join in and we like checking how we did each week!

If the person you are making a card for is a car fan, then there are several possibilities for artwork or dies that could be suitable. Whether a carefully constructed VW camper van is your style or a racing car – there’s something for everyone on the website. I love old cards as in these illustrations by Kevin Walsh. We are working on a new set of pads from Kevin that should be available later in the year – something gentle, vintage and festively Christmas themed! Watch this space…

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The origin of the willow pattern…

I know the most popular colourway relating to willow pattern… is blue, obviously. However, I think it looks good in a black silhouette too.

I have willow patterned everyday plates and blue and white pots and vases galore in my home. I love the romantic feel of the design and like the story that supposedly describes the images – I am quoting here from Wikipedia:

Once there was a wealthy Mandarin, who had a beautiful daughter (Koong-se). She had fallen in love with her father’s humble accounting assistant (Chang), angering her father. (It was inappropriate for them to marry due to their difference in social class.) He dismissed the young man and built a high fence around his house to keep the lovers apart. The Mandarin was planning for his daughter to marry a powerful Duke. The Duke arrived by boat to claim his bride, bearing a box of jewels as a gift. The wedding was to take place on the day the blossom fell from the willow tree.

On the eve of the daughter’s wedding to the Duke, the young accountant, disguised as a servant, slipped into the palace unnoticed. As the lovers escaped with the jewels, the alarm was raised. They ran over a bridge, chased by the Mandarin, whip in hand. They eventually escaped on the Duke’s ship to the safety of a secluded island, where they lived happily for years. But one day, the Duke learned of their refuge. Hungry for revenge, he sent soldiers, who captured the lovers and put them to death. The gods, moved by their plight, transformed the lovers into a pair of doves (possibly a later addition to the tale since the birds do not appear on the earliest willow pattern plates

So when you are using a willow pattern die or stencil or stamp reflect on the sad demise of a mandarin’s daughter that had the misfortune to fall in love with an accountant … I won’t mention this to assorted members of my family that are either accountants or married to one!

These cards show off how striking the dies can look in black and they have set me wondering what it would look like as white images on black, or how about white on pale or dark blue? Love our craft!

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Howard Robinson’s Farmhouse

 

I always feel as though making a little decoupaged scene feels rather like creating a jigsaw puzzle – and I love puzzles! It may actually be that you have seen this image in a range of jigsaw puzzles as the artist Howard Robinson licenses quite a few of his creations to puzzle manufacturers around the world. It always makes me smile when I spot a puzzle from an image I recognise in a toy store.

There are twenty sheets to play with in the pack of Howard Robinson decoupage and it does feel like play. In this farmhouse picture, there’s the group of animals to arrange and it’s up to you how much detail and how many layers you choose to add. You can be really frugal and make more than one card from a sheet, it’s all personal choice.

I have to say the only real success I have had with decoupage over all my years’ experience is when I have been using a glue gel. My choice is usually Pinflair or Collall – both work really well and make decoupage a delight to create. You can make 3D decoupage cards with foam squares but the end result looks very gappy in my opinion, with glue gel you can curve the edges and vary the heights.

If you have never tried decoupage, these sheets are a good place to start – and remember you may find it easier to snip everything out using a tool like decoupage snips – if you don’t want to use those than try for some really small but sharp scissors.

Happy cardmaking!

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Joanna Sheen Cardmaking Collection

I know many of you will have spotted this Cardmaking Collection back in January when it was released, but we have had so much positive feedback from it – I’m so glad everyone has enjoyed playing with the freebies and the papers – that I thought it would be good to just mention it again.

There are many nice bits and pieces that come with the set – a FANTASTIC embossing folder, that I have loved and used and used, a jug on a lace tablecloth that just goes so brilliantly with the flowers in the kit or any other flowers you choose. The daffodil die is of course very appropriate as the daffs are all struggling to come out now the snow has cleared (at least down here in Devon it has!) and there are so many different designs you could create with this die.

I have to say thank you to some of Practical Publishing’s team that made some of the cards in this picture, Nicky Gilburt, Jo Boland and Sue Hughes. There are many more card designers that worked on this issue and I wish I could mention them all – they are a very talented team.

Also included in this kit is the pretty stencil and of course fabulous rubber stamps and not forgetting the sheets and sheets of backing papers and toppers.

Currently, we have a few copies left so if you fancy one, grab it now before they disappear forever – they never republish an issue!

 

 

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