Peas, please!

Peas – those round, sweet, green things – even people who don’t much like veggies seem to approve of peas. It’s the perfect instant veg, to be whipped out of the freezer and cooked at a moment’s notice, but let me assure you they are even better when picked and eaten fresh.

Lots of people think growing peas is a bit of a waste of time and space… but they have probably never picked them and eaten them straight from the pod. They are so sweet and so delicious! I pick a few at a time, as they mature on the plant, and steam them for a couple of minutes, then run them under cold water and add to my salad alongside my home-grown leaves and broad beans creating a garden salad ­– delicious.

Peas are one of those things that we think of as essentially ‘British’. Fish, chips and mushy peas, pie and peas, pea soup… but as is so often the case when you look into it, they are a relatively recent arrival on our shores and originate from north-west Asia!

But our climate suits them perfectly and they thrive here. As a nation we certainly love them – we eat far more than any other country in Europe, chomping around 9,000 each per year. That’s a lot of peas! Fortunately, they are good for us combining fibre and protein with vitamins and minerals and must be the most popular of the ‘5-a-day’… or is it ‘10-a-day’ now? I can’t keep up!

They are relatively easy to grow either from seed, or you can buy them as small plants. The only real problem is with pigeons… they love them! Having lost an entire crop in one day a few years ago, I now cover them with netting. Even then, they still get a bit nibbled. But to me, the sweetness, the vivid colour and that pleasing ‘pop’ of the pod makes them all worthwhile

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Happy Birthday Chickens from Marjolein Bastin

This lovely image of chickens is painted by Marjolein Bastin, an artist whose works I really admire. So many of her designs that we have licensed are just brilliant. This particular image comes from her ‘Spring’ collection pad. Excuse me if I have a slight snigger at the rather weak joke of a ‘Spring Chicken’ card for a friend who possibly isn’t one anymore!

You can use so many different embossing folders with this style of card and although the ‘Best Wishes’ words are using the All Occasion (147) die – you could use any you have handy. The useful thing about our paper pad collections is that pretty much everything you need is on the page and, in this case, the fun spotty border with the hen is from the same page as the main image.

 

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Seagulls and Butterflies

Seagulls and butterflies  – these two cards are a lovely summery pair to inspire you to make a card, whether it’s someone’s birthday or to show you are thinking about them.

Both images come from the Marjolein Bastin Summer pad and I am constantly happy that we came up with the combination of “almost everything you need on one sheet” pads! It saves so much time and frustration if you all you need to do is dip into your stash for the blank cards and perhaps the odd embellishments or two.

The Seagull card is simple – some matting and layering on white and grey card with a trellis style backing paper. Then the border and decoupage pieces are all from the same sheet on the pad.

The pretty little butterfly card uses the addition of the Signature Dies Jessica lace border (SD514) and some rhinestones as well as all the interesting little embellishments included on the page of the Summer paper pad.

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Sweet peas are fabulous flowers!

 

I think sweet peas are fabulous flowers, wonderful to grow in your garden and brilliant to have as cut flowers in your house, full of such beautiful scent. If it had been practical I would have loved to have sweet peas everywhere for our wedding, they look so romantic and pretty – but umm, a December wedding? I don’t think so!

This card uses a couple of very popular Signature dies, Victoria Lace (SD308) and Sweet Pea (SD466) with a few other bits and bobs and produces the prettiest of birthday cards (or anytime card).

Ingredients:

  • 6” square white card blank
  • Signature dies, Victoria Lace and Sweet Pea
  • Some pale backing paper we chose green
  • Cardstock in white and pink and pale green
  • Photocorners or a photo corner die
  • Decorative oval dies (like Spellbinders or similar)
  • Preprinted sentiment, scrap of pink gingham and some pearls

Quick ‘how to’:

  1. Trim some backing paper slightly smaller than the card blank. Die cut a scalloped oval in white, the Victoria Lace in white and the photo corners if you are using a die.
  2. Die cut a decorative oval in strong pink and create the “V” shaped pieces by hand with sharp scissors.
  3. Now assemble the card by sticking the backing paper to the card blank (I use double sided tape) then add the pink oval using Pinflair glue gel so it is slightly raised. Once the glue is dry, take a sharp craft knife and make a cut and slide in the small V shaped pieces each side to give the effect that they go right through.
  4. Add the scalloped oval using glue gel again. Die cut the sweet peas in pale green and white and colour the white flowers with alcohol ink pens. Attach the green first and then snip the flowers away from the white die cut, and layer these over the green die cut using glue gel.
  5. Attach the Victoria Lace diecut, use something like a quickie glue pen or glossy accents or cosmic acrylic glue, whatever you have in stock.
  6. Finish the card with the embellishments, the ribbon bow, corners, sentiment and pearls.
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Guerrilla gardening!

There is a roundabout, just off the A30 on the way to my crime writing partner Julia’s house, that is a delight to behold in the spring and summer when it is a mass of colour with wildflowers in profusion. This oasis in the middle of a three-way junction is the work of a local ‘guerrilla gardener’!

Marvellous, we cry! But did you know that planting roundabouts and road verges with flowers and plants is actually illegal? Going onto and planting any land you do not own is illegal in most countries in the world. How very dull…

However… very few people have ever been prosecuted. Councils are in a difficult position because there are, understandably, health and safety issues around people gardening on roundabouts at night and they can’t be seen to condone it. Sense seems to prevail though and most authorities take a relaxed stance and, if people enjoy the results and no damage is done, they tend to turn a blind eye.

If you fancy a bit of rebellion in a terribly nice and green-fingered way, you may want to look at The Guerrilla Gardener’s blog. He says: “Let’s fight the filth with forks and flowers” which strikes me as a very fine sentiment!

As you may know from previous blogs, I am a bit of a fan of things in miniature. So if you fancy trying some guerrilla gardening on a smaller scale, have a look at the fabulous images and ideas on The Pothole Gardener’s blog. He creates miniature gardens in potholes – and before you rush out into the middle of your local dual carriageway, I should add these are potholes in pavements, not roads! As much as I would love to do this, I fear my knees would not be co-operative!

Have you spotted any guerrilla gardening near where you live? Or, have you ever undertaken any yourself…? Do let us know!

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