Cosmos and hanging baskets

If you read the title and thought “You can’t put cosmos in a hanging basket” you would probably be correct!

There may be some mini ones I am not aware of but the glorious softly waving flowers at the back of my border would definitely not fit in a basket! No, the title refers to the mix on this card where I have embellished one of Jane Shasky’s amazing images with a die cut basket full of flowers.

The Signature dies I used for this were Hanging Basket and Flowers for Containers. The flower die was specially designed so you can fill the basket to size and choose how you colour them.

You could focus on bright reds as if it were a basket of geraniums, or if the card needs something soft and dgentle – how about cream, white and pale yellow? The joy of diecutting in white is playing with your markers to get something completely unique for your project.

The butterfly in the top right corner is snipped away from the diecut of Butterfly Cloud. The other butterflies all come on the sheet from the pad.

It’s a simple card but a fun change of colour combination for me, I did enjoy playing with this design.

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The Proof is in the Pudding

Drum roll… today sees the launch of the  final instalment of the Swaddlecombe Mysteries – ‘The Proof is in the Pudding’! 

Some of you sharp-eyed readers may notice that the cover is different to the one we showed you a few months ago. We just didn’t feel the initial design was quite right and, as this book is set in the winter, I really wanted to use one of Julia’s lovely atmospheric photos, so we managed to get it changed – phew! ‘The Proof is in the Pudding’ is available now in paperback from my website for £6.99 and it is also on Kindle for £3.99.

Here’s what it says on the book cover: “Victoria West’s first Christmas in sleepy Swaddlecombe looks like being a traditional country affair… but then, as the decorations go up, so does the body count. A Christmas wreath making course, liberally lubricated by local wines, comes to a tragic conclusion. Farmer Albert Moreton has things on his mind and the Reverend Ruminant has been busy plotting…

The whole village is getting festive with a ‘Caroloke’ in the pub and, of course, there’s the infamous old folks’ Christmas party to navigate.

Handsome men abound but are they really what they seem? Is the Lord of the Manor a philanderer? Is the gardener safe with his axe? Why would Tipple the pug’s owner abandon him, and how far would anyone go to get their hands on a fortune? Victoria and Albert have their work cut out to identify ‘who dunnit’ in this frenzied festive free-for-all.”

I do so hope you enjoy reading it as much as we did writing it.

I will be on Create & Craft today (13th October) from 12 noon and throughout the weekend for lots of lovely demonstrations… and you can be sure I will be waving the new book about at every opportunity too! Remember, all dates are subject to change so please check the TV schedules on the day.

 

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Rainy birthday!

Rainy birthday? Oh dear… It would be nice if there was a rule of Nature that it never rained on your birthday… nope not happening. If it didn’t rain on anybody’s birthday, we’d live in a desert Joanna, be sensible! But it does always seem sad when you wake (as I did this year) on your birthday to hear rain pelting against the glass of your bedroom windows!

However, with luck the younger generations think rain is fun and like dancing in puddles and this is reflected in this lovely birthday card.

The teddies are from a great pack of decoupage that has a lot of occasions covered. The John Bindon set of decoupage has so many different occasions that it could help with card ideas. It’s temporarily on offer on the website at the moment, so that’s a fair bit of inspiration for £4.99 as well as £5 saving. See I knew we saved money by being cardmakers!

The backing paper is from Volume 1 of my collection of backing papers and the umbrella die is (SD157) from the Signature dies range, unsurprisingly called Umbrella! It’s a quick and easy card to make and hopefully your recipient won’t need an umbrella on their birthday!

 

 

 

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Tulip mania!

The humble tulip, so often seen wrapped up in cellophane on a garage forecourt, actually has a fascinating and exciting history that’s as good as any romantic novel!

It started life as a wild flower until it began being cultivated in Persia, probably in the 10th century. Rather sweetly, the name ‘tulip’ is thought to come from a Persian word for turban, which it may have been thought to resemble. It then carries on growing quietly, relatively unnoticed… but all that changed in the 1630s when the tulip became the ‘It girl’ of its era, an incredibly valuable commodity on which fortunes were made and lost.

Tulips finally came to the attention of the west in the sixteenth century, when diplomats to the Ottoman court observed and reported on them. Tulips were rapidly introduced into Europe and botanists started to hybridize the flower and they soon found ways of making even more decorative and tempting specimens. Hybrids and mutations of the flower were seen as rarities and a sign of high status – definitely the Burberry handbag of its day!

In the months of late 1636 to early 1637 there was a complete ‘Tulip mania’ in the Netherlands. The enthusiasm for the new tulips triggered a speculative frenzy and tulip bulbs became so expensive that they were treated as a form of currency, or rather, as futures. Some examples of the flower could cost more than a house in Amsterdam at this time.

There was an inevitable crash in prices in 1637, when people came to their senses and stopped purchasing the bulbs at such high prices. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, interest in the tulip remained, but the Dutch became the true connoisseurs and stockists. To this day, tulips are associated with the Netherlands, and the cultivated forms of the tulip are often called ‘Dutch tulips.’ The Netherlands has the world’s largest permanent display of tulips at the Keukenhof.

In their natural state tulips are adapted to mountainous areas with temperate climates. Flowering in the spring, they become dormant in the summer once the flowers and leaves die back, emerging above ground as a shoot from the underground bulb in early spring.

Nowadays, there are many different tulip varieties to choose from and you can still buy some of the original ‘wild’ varieties, often called ‘species’ tulips.

Not everyone loves tulips and not everyone seems to have much success growing them, I certainly don’t! Is it one of your favourites, or would you rather be presented with a bunch of something else?

 

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Birthday Brollies and Boots!

I thought these cards paired rather well together – brollies and boots – British weather and all that. So one card features rain clouds (we may just have had some of those this summer) and the other the pretty lacy wellies in the Signature Die collection.

First, the sweet little card that uses an image from the Donald Zolan (pad 2) collection. She’s a dear little girl and I love the children’s innocence in his artwork. The card measures 8 inches square and uses the Signature dies Lace Parasol die. The clouds are from the Signature Dies ‘Weather Forecast’ die, as are the raindrops.

The other card is also 8 inches square and uses backing papers from our backing paper collection (Volume 3) and then obviously the Wellies using the Signature die ‘Lacy Wellington’. The flower pots are also die cut (SD025 Flower Pots) and then pieces snipped from Signature dies Climbing Rose and Trailing Ivy filled up the pots!

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