A swim on the wild side!

This week, our guest blogger is my very own youngest daughter – Emily! She has been home from university for a few weeks before going away for six months on a work placement. While here, she was able to spend some time with old school friends and head off to the beach… where she had an interesting encounter!

“The sun put in a rare appearance, so I decided to head down to Babbacombe beach and enjoy a dip in the sea with some friends. As always, the British sea proved to be a lot colder than we remembered, but we took the plunge and swam out towards the five-knot-buoy. 

Suddenly, we spotted a smooth, dark shape gliding just below the water surface. We turned and a head popped up, watching us with large, dark eyes. We were so excited, it’s so rare to see a seal in the wild, let alone swim with one!

The large grey seal known as “Sammy” is a regular visitor at Babbacombe, coming almost daily to coax the locals into giving him the fish they catch off the quayside. Now that’s what I call smart – let the humans do the hard work, so you don’t have to! Recently featured in the local paper, Sammy worried locals a few weeks ago when he swam up to the quay with a hook in his side, although he left before the RSPCA had arrived. We can only presume he was protected by his thick hide. 

After a while we got out of the water to fetch our cameras and ran to the quayside where the seal was cruising up and down waiting for fish. He seemed hugely tame and was content to come within an arm’s length of us, even gently taking a fish straight from a fisherman’s hand! It was just fascinating to watch such a large creature (it looked to be about one and a half metres long and at least half a metre wide) move so gracefully in the water!

It had to be the best trip to the beach ever, and we plan to head back tonight and see if he’s still there!”

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Busy bees

Spending so much time with flowers over the years, I’m a great respecter of bees. When you’re in your garden, it’s rare not to hear their gentle drone. I would never keep bees and respect them though I do… no way could I have ‘pet’ bees!

The big, slow moving bumble bee doesn’t produce much honey but it is an important pollinator. The smaller honey bee not only pollinates but also toils away to produce honey from the pollen it collects.

I knew bees were vital, but I was surprised when I read that one in three mouthfuls of the food we eat is dependent on pollination – so worrying when we are told that honeybee numbers have fallen by up to 30% in recent years

Honey, and the bees that create it, are both pretty amazing! Honeybees are the only insects to produce food for humans and honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life, including enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and water.

And wow, do ‘worker’ honey bees deserve their name! The average worker bee produces about one twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in her lifetime. She visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip… and as you will have gathered it is the female of the species that does all the work!

Larger than the worker bees, the male honey bees (also called drones), have no stinger and do no work at all. All they do is mate. Now there’s a surprise!! (Sorry all you guys that read the blog……..)

 

 

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A wonderful walk right on my doorstep!

Morwenstow on the north coast.I know I do tend to go on about how lovely Devon is… but it just is! This week, I thought I’d ramble (excuse the pun!) on about the South West Coast Path.

Not only is Devon blessed with lovely rolling countryside and dramatic moorland, it also has two stunning coastlines to the north and south. The north is rugged and exposed, while the south is softer with more sheltered bays. Devon is the chunky ‘thigh’ of the south west ‘leg’ of England that delicately dips its toe out to the far south west and the Atlantic ocean.

The South West Coast Path National Trail goes right round this leg taking in Devon and Cornwall and more – starting in the north, at Minehead in Somerset and going on for 630 miles – to Poole in Dorset in the south

It is regarded as one of the top walks to be found anywhere in the world. The heritage, wildlife, geology and scenery along the way are stunning and every day spent walking it brings new experiences.

The lovely harbour town of Dartmouth in south Devon.You don’t have to be super fit, and you obviously don’t have to do all of it! Some areas, especially in Cornwall, are very steep and challenging (and very beautiful) but lots of other sections are gentle and make lovely seaside strolls.

Some people spend years walking small sections of it, ticking off the miles until they’ve done the whole thing. Others – heaven help them – tackle the whole thing in a couple of months, often for charity.

There’s a rather nifty scheme that lets you stay in B&Bs, while some obliging people will drive your bags on ahead of you so that, when you arrived footsore after a coastal canter, your bubble bath and slippers are ready and waiting for you.

There’s a very good website: www.southwestcoastpath.com which shows you everything you need from amazing photos that will inspire you, to walks that are interesting for children, or include pubs on the route (count me in!).

The coastal path in south Cornwall.

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Letterboxing on Dartmoor

As you know, I live on the coast in Devon, but a few miles inland from us lies wild and wonderful Dartmoor, sometimes known as ‘England’s last wilderness’. This granite moorland with it’s craggy tors, patches of remarkably soggy ground and a lack of footpaths can be a bit off-putting unless you can handle a map and compass… as well as being downright spooky!

So all the more strange then to see youngsters (and adults!) burrowing among the rocks, engrossed in a search… but for what? In these days of Facebook, Twitter and texts, how does Dartmoor still attract today’s youth. 

Guest blogger, Sue Viccars, editor of the Dartmoor Magazine and a professional outdoor writer (how’s that for interesting job descriptions?!) explains all…

“People have been using Dartmoor as a place of leisure since the early 19th-century Romantic Movement. This was when parts of the country such as the Lake District and Exmoor – previously thought inhospitable – suddenly became popular through the work of writers such as Wordsworth and Coleridge.

“On Dartmoor, local guides opened up the moor to visitors, in particular James Perrott of Chagford, who in 1854 came up with a novel ‘tourist attraction’ by building a cairn at Cranmere Pool, a peaty moorland hollow far from civilisation. The idea was for anyone who made it out to this remote part of the North Moor to leave their card at the spot for the interest of later visitors.

“Little did he realise what he had started! After 1907, visitors began leaving stamped addressed postcards in the box, recording the date of their visit, which were subsequently collected and put in the post by the next person to make it out there. This practice continued right up to the 1970s when it was replaced by a stamp system, And so, modern Letterboxing was born – the practice of following clues to find concealed ‘letterboxes’ all over the moor and collecting the stamps contained inside.

“The idea of Letterboxing has since spread to other parts of the world, and the number of letterboxes on Dartmoor has ballooned so that the number out at any one time has to be controlled. Biannual Letterbox Meets, at which clues for new letterbox routes are sold in aid of charity, attract hundreds, it not thousands, of people keen to get out and explore.

“In this way, thousands of people have been introduced to the delights of the moor through Letterboxing. It’s also a great way of persuading children to leave behind their computer screens and go on a moorland ‘treasure hunt’!”

To find out more about Sue’s wonderful quarterly magazine, click here: www.dartmoormagazine.co.uk

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Seashore inspiration…

It’s been so warm this past week I was determined to set foot on the beach at least once! I adore beachcombing – it’s relaxing, therapeutic, invigorating and just plain old fun!

Finding pretty shells is an obvious attraction, but some of the plant life is fascinating. Sea holly, beloved of many flower arrangers, looks stunning in its natural setting, alongside grasses and samphire and other weird and wonderful looking things that I don’t even know the name of.

Thrift is another favourite – such a cheerful little plant – I really look forward to seeing it every year – but goodness knows how it manages to grow in such barren rocky areas.

I love the colour palette of the seashore, and I’ve used it for inspiration when decorating – restful and cool blues and greeny-greys alongside pale blonde sand. But there can be vibrancy too, as in the thrift and in startling yellow/orange lichens. We are blessed with turquoise blue seas down here and that is a wonderful colour to use as a starting point for any water-themed project.

On my recent beachcomb, I picked up a spider crab shell. The detail in both colour and texture is extraordinary. I’ve no idea what I’ll do with it, but I’ll store it away for future use!

 

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