Old-fashioned Christmas

“Christmas?” I hear you cry, “Has the woman lost the plot?” No, honestly, I haven’t! I just wanted to show you a couple of samples from the Victorian Christmas Card CD, in case any of you were planning to make lots of cards for charity or for general sale and needed to start early.

One section of this CD I would particularly like to point out to you is the Shaped Cards section on CD3. Here, you have a lovely selection of cards that are not the usual rectangular or square shape, but have little cutaways and other pretty devices to make small but stunning cards. With the cost of postage going up all the time I know there are many that want to make sure their Christmas cards are compact and the postage element is as inexpensive as possible.

These two cards are examples of the designs on the CDs. There are hundreds of pages to mooch through and, as we all know, deciding what to use is always a tough decision! Every topper has a backing paper and multiple inserts and stationery to match so there’s no excuse not to be totally co-ordinated this year!

The reason I like the more vintage designs is, I suppose, because I love remembering the Christmasses of my childhood when everything was just perfect! Of course it wasn’t, but my memories always tend to be viewed through rose tinted spectacles and perhaps that’s the best way for things to be!

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Blue and White for Christmas

This was my favourite of all the samples I had for the Christmas Patchwork Stamps when I launched them on Create and Craft last week. The great thing is you only need one ink pad – a nice denim blue. You could try Faded Jeans from the Tim Holtz distress inks but there are dozens of others.

The white base card is just under 8”square or 203mm. The first lot of stamping is done on a 6 ½” sq (165mm) piece of white card and to get the stamps nicely lined up, it is much easier to use the patchwork grid that we have put on the tuition section of our website for you to download free of charge. Follow the pattern and when that part is complete, edge it with some dashes to look like stitching, done with a fine liner pen.

Then create the next piece of card which is 4 ½” square (115mm) – again follow the pattern in the picture and edge it with faux stitching as above. Fix the two pieces onto the base card and then embellish with the central squares and some flowers.

This could look just as nice in red or green if you prefer more traditional Christmas colours.

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A picturesque landscape…

As we drive out of our village towards the motorway for another of our trips to TV land, we get a lovely view of the high tors of Dartmoor in the distance. For quite a few weeks in January, the tors were covered in snow, as was much of the moorland area and the communities within it.

One of the many attractions of this beautiful area are the Dartmoor ponies that roam the moorland alongside grazing cattle and sheep. They are incredibly sweet and you will often see young foals by the road, barely able to stand on their ludicrously long legs, with their hugely round mothers watching protectively nearby.

They are hardy animals and, unless snow cover is very deep and prolonged, they manage to forage quite well. Contrary to what most people think, the ponies on Dartmoor are not truly wild animals. They are all owned by farmers, who let them out on to the commons to graze for most of the year and this is where most visitors to Dartmoor come across them.

They are an integral part of the moorland landscape and are a part of the area’s cultural heritage and important for conservation grazing.

Dartmoor National Park is home to the native breed Dartmoor Pony. But not all the ponies on Dartmoor look the same. Importing other breeds has created various colours and shapes and some of them are absolutely gorgeous – I’ve seen a spotted one, just like a Dalmation!

The ponies live out on the moor all year round. They spend most of the time in small herds of mares with one adult stallion and young ponies. Local farmers who keep ponies get together to clear ponies off their particular common. These round ups are called ‘drifts’ and are held in late September and early October. Once, driving across the moor to Tavistock, we came across a drift, and stopped to watch. What a magical sight it was as all these ponies streamed down across the hillside, crossing the road in front of us, and then down to the collecting pens.

Once in the pens, ponies are separated into groups according to ownership. The health of all the animals is checked, and treatment is given where appropriate. After the drifts pony keepers decide which ponies to sell. The rest are returned to the moor until the following year. And so the cycle continues…

 

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Traumatic times for chickens!

Winter is a tricky time for chickens. My Hen Pal, Julia, has been telling me all about their woes! None of her five hens laid an egg from mid-November until mid-January – a combination of short daylight hours, dismal weather and their old age.

Rather sweetly, when we had our first really sunny January day, one of the hens heaved out a very weird offering. When Julia first brought it in at teatime, it was whole, but with a patchy, sandy texture, and a curious bump on one end.

By the following morning, the sub-standard eggshell finish had cracked in the warmth of the house and the whole thing looked rather sorry for itself, as you can see in the photo.

Up on Dartmoor where Julia lives, they had quite a covering of snow for almost a week. The chickens refused to come out of their coop unless a patch of earth had been scraped clear. They would then proceed, cautiously, to come outside and eat, drink and scratch around normally, but staying on the cleared area. One brave one did trot across the snow, but then made a point of showing how cold her feet were!

Strangely, the snow brought on even more eggs, possibly because of the amount of reflected light, and they have been producing one egg a day quite regularly for the rest of January.

Who knows how chickens’ minds work? Well, who’d want to, frankly, but these eggy offerings can be taken as a sign that the days are lengthening and that spring is definitely on the way!

 

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Looking good in winter…

Animals have got it right when it comes to winter – curl up and hibernate for a few months (having gorged yourself first!) or keep nice and warm in your snug-fitting fur coat. Sadly for us poor old humans, we just have to brave the elements. So we end up with chapped lips, dry skin, dull hair and numerous other problems. But don’t despair, with a little bit of ingenuity we can perk ourselves up no end.

Making a rich moisturiser out of natural ingredients is a great way to give your skin a treat.

Devon Cider Apple Cream

  • 500g (1lb) white vegetable fat
  • 500g (1lb) apples (weight after being peeled and cored)
  • 120ml rose water
  • A few drops of alcoholic tincture of benzoin (preservative)

This is not a particularly sophisticated cream but, believe me, it works excellently. It also makes a good hand cream.

Melt the vegetable fat in a pan over a low heat. Put the prepared apples in a food processor or blender and purée totally Add the apple juice and pulp to the fat and stir together well. Remove from the heat and add the rose water and benzoin. Strain immediately, put into screw-top jars and keep in the fridge. Massage the cream into face and neck – and give you hands a treat at the same time!

Sunflower & Sea Salt Body Rub

  • Small amount of sunflower oil
  • Sea salt

This is ideal for tired winter skin. It also works well if you substitute granulated sugar for the sea salt.

Treat your body in sections. First, apply a little sunflower oil to soften and dampen the skin, then take a handful of sea salt and rub well into the area you have prepared. This will slough off any dead skin cells and leave your skin glowing and awake. Wash off the oil and salt mix with warm water – the easiest way is in the shower.

 

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