Growing up fast…

My partner in crime writing, Julia, got a new puppy back in March last year and we introduced you to her the following month – Moss, a Wirehaired German Pointer. Well, Moss is now one year old and has grown up into quite a character! She has her own Facebook page and also ‘writes’ reviews for a local business ‘Dartmoor Accommodation’ about dog-friendly places to visit. We thought we’d let her bring you up to date with her life so far…

Hello! I am Moss, the Dartmoor Dog Blogger. I have grown up a lot since you last saw me and I no longer look like a Spaniel. My lovely wirehaired coat has grown, and I am generally regarded as rather gorgeous with a fine moustache and beard. I also have pale greeny gold eyes which, I am told, are one of my best features.

I am lucky (so she keeps telling me) as I live on a farm on Dartmoor so I get lots of nice walks by the river, on the moor or just around the fields on the farm. I am especially fond of puddles, and I like to lie in them, but I am not a very good swimmer yet, I am still learning. I enjoy being in the waves in the sea when we go on holiday and I did swim a bit in Cornwall last summer.

A few of my favourite things! Top to bottom: The watering can incident, puddle bathing, mulching, erm… cushion chewing, relaxing on the sofa.I am, apparently, quite naughty and not very obedient (whatever that is!) and I do like a good chew. I have chewed all sorts of things – from my bed, to the aerial cable and part of a watering can, to name but a few. Different things have different textures and I like to try them out.

I have also tried different types of food such as raw spaghetti and garlic (euw!). Every day, as well as my proper food, I have natural yogurt, raw carrots and some pumpkin seeds – which are very yummy and I would like to eat them all the time. I am a very healthy dog! I also like to recycle things, like paper and cardboard and chew them up ready for the bin men. I am also good at mulching in the garden, chewing everything up and then spreading it around and sometimes bringing it into the house… which she doesn’t appreciate.

Sometimes, we go and visit nice places like hotels or pubs where they welcome dogs, some have water bowls and dog biscuits and special towels for me to wipe my feet on. I have to sit and watch her chomp her way through free meals and afternoon tea and I get given titbits. She then writes about it and I get even more famous! I think she probably get a better deal out of it than I do, but I do get to meet lots of new people, who are always very nice to me.

All in all, it’s not a bad life. I get to sleep a lot and relax on the sofa, it is quite tiring being famous and it is hard work training her to do what I want, but I am getting there… I reckon she’ll be well-trained by the end of this year.

Licks, Moss.

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Danger’s Last Resort

 Finally, here it is! Launching in the next week or so, the first of my solo novels entitled ‘Danger’s Last Resort’. I will send out more details as soon as we have the paperbacks here and the Kindle version is listed on Amazon – but I thought you might like to read a sneak preview. You can see the cover finally making it through the printing process here and I can’t wait to be sent the finished book!

I have put my heart and soul into writing this book and it has acted as a wonderful escape from my complicated family life at the moment, so I hope you will all find it as uplifting to read as I did to write.

The story…
Stuck in a junior manager’s job in a dreary English hotel, Rose dreams of exotic travel. Then, astonishingly, that dream comes true when she inherits property right on the beach in tropical Barbados.

It’s not the cosy seashore cottage she expects but a once grandly genteel destination where Princess Margaret used to stay – but it’s now threadbare and overgrown. Still, the hotel oozes charm and possibility. Can Rose see her future here, recreating the dignified, welcoming oasis it used to be?

Then the death threats start and both Rose and her family are in danger. Unsettling things, threatening things. Barbados turns out to be the opposite of paradise. Its gorgeous turquoise waters are infested with particularly treacherous sharks: cutthroat people who want Rose’s beachfront property and will stop at nothing to get it!

Well, I hope that whets your appetites – oh, and there’s a little romance thrown in along the way! Happy reading…

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Blooming marvellous

MayblossomWhen I sit down and think what to write about in my blog, I sometimes have to chew the end of my pen for a bit… but this week, I had no hesitation! Everywhere we have been in the past week or so, we have been ‘wowed’ by the blossom in this extraordinary spring!

We are very lucky in Devon that we always have a profusion of wildflowers, but this year is a truly bumper year. Last year, when we wrote ‘A Violet Death’ I can remember my partner in crime writing, Julia, struggling to find violets to photograph for the cover… this year, you cannot walk through woodlands or meadow without treading on the gorgeous things, they are everywhere! Coloured from deepest purple to pale lilac, wild violets abound. Primroses, wood anemones and celandines have also been amazing this year.

Currently, the biggest ‘wow’ has to be the may blossom, or hawthorn. In this area of steep hills and small fields, we are blessed with plenty of hedgerows and I don’t think I have ever seen such clouds of white may blossom as we have right now. The blossom is so thick it looks like snow! If you look at the flowers close up, they are so pretty.

Top to bottom – wild violets absolutely everywhere this year! Delicate wood anemones and primroses and primulas in profusion.I must just ramble on for a moment about hawthorn as it is a rather wonderful plant, but one that tends to get overlooked as being rather commonplace. It is used extensively for hedging and its spines and many tangled branches make it pretty much animal and human-proof. When you have a garden bordering a field used for cows or sheep… you will find a hawthorn hedge extremely useful! The traditional practice of hedge laying (which we still see a great deal of down here in Devon) works very well with hawthorn. It is also a good firewood and burns with a good heat and little smoke.

The fruit of the hawthorn, called haws, are edible raw but of course we mostly cook them and use them in jellies, jams, and syrups. They can also be used to make wine, or to add flavour to brandy. Even the petals of the may blossom are edible, as are the leaves, which if picked in spring when still young are tender enough to be used in salads. So all in all, a pretty wonderful thing!

With so much splendour in the wild, my garden almost seems a poor second at the moment. But, luckily for me, it has also been a bumper year for one of my most favourite plants ­– hellebores – and mine have done really well, so I am happy.

Sadly, the forecasters are saying that this recent spell of hot and dry weather will end soon – can you believe they are already talking about drought conditions?! Regardless of the change, it is thrilling to see that first few bluebells and sprigs of wild garlic are just emerging, ready for their displays next month. I can hardly wait!

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Puppy time!

As many of you will know, we lost our beloved Wellington before Christmas. Sadly my partner in crime writing, Julia, then lost her dog Tilly in February this year. Richard and I have decided to take a little break and think about our possible future doggy companion… But Julia decided she couldn’t bear to be without a four-legged friend, and so here is the story of her new puppy. You will never guess what she is called…

“I am lucky enough to live on Dartmoor, with access to farmland, open fields and small sheltered farm tracks. Walking every day with my dog and watching the seasons change was always a very important part of my life. When Tilly went, I felt bereft. Knowing that I would never be able to replace the two wonderful collie cross dogs that had been my companions for the past 18 years, Tilly and her predecessor Rosie, I decided it might be wise to go for something completely different. Good friends of mine have had two delightful German pointers, the latest one being wirehaired. She is a particularly delightful dog so I decided this would be the breed of choice.

After much searching, and a very long trip to south west Wales, I arrived home with a gorgeous little bundle of fluffy puppy! Rather predictably, she has been named Moss. Yes, the same name as the dog in Joanna and my novels but of course that Moss is a dog, not a bitch, and he is a collie cross. 

Choosing a name that suits the personality is important, so although I was pretty sure I wanted to call her Moss, I would only know if it was right for her once I actually met her. The first time I gazed into her bright little eyes I realised it was definitely the right choice as she has the most beautiful moss green eyes and not the normal soulful brown of most dogs. She is officially coloured liver (brown) with white ticking which makes for an extremely pretty speckled coat.

It is 18 years since I last had a puppy and it certainly makes you realise how much younger and fitter I was in those days! Having a puppy is very like having a toddler suddenly thrust upon you in your comfortable middle age, a mixture of sheer delight and utter exhaustion all at the same time.

We realised quite early on that Moss possesses extremely large paws… Which could only mean one thing – in due course we are going to be the owners of a rather large dog! When I first brought her home at 10 weeks she weighed a not insubstantial 5 kg. She was easy to pick up and wonderfully soft and cuddly. Now at 15 weeks she weighs a very hearty 9 kg and is getting quite difficult to pick up! However, I am pleased to say she still remains a delightfully affectionate little dog, well, quite a big dog actually.

She is doing us good too as we are enjoying long walks in the lighter evenings in the beautiful countryside where we live up here on Dartmoor. Pointers need a lot of exercise, so there will be no slacking! Introducing her to water in the rivers and streams that abound around here is great fun and her energy and enthusiasm for life is wonderful to behold. She is currently very gangly, rather like a foal, and watching her gallop about, quite often falling over her own feet, has us in stitches. Like a young child, as soon as she has used up her energy – that’s it – she falls sound asleep, and that’s when we get to enjoy wonderful snoozy cuddles!

Apart from chewing everything and everybody at the moment, she is turning out to be intelligent, energetic, brave, enthusiastic and extremely lovable. Rather like older doting parents, we are completely besotted and convinced that she is a future Crufts best in show or possibly canine Mastermind champion. But most of all, she is just our adorable and loyal companion.”

 

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The wonders of seaweed!

Julia with her lovely terrier appropriately named Seaweed!I first met Julia Horton-Powdrill on a writing course, some six years ago. I was there with my partner in crime writing Julia Wherrell (you don’t meet a Julia for years and then two come along at once!) and we have stayed in touch ever since. Julia H-P lives in St David’s in Pembrokeshire where she runs foraging courses, writes novels and runs the ‘Really Wild Food Festival’ – one busy lady! Julia W went to visit earlier this month as she was collecting her new puppy from the area (and that’s another blog coming soon!), so she thought she’d ask Julia H-P about foraging and one of her major passions – seaweed!

While I enjoy growing my own veg and picking the odd mushroom and wild berry, I really am not very knowledgeable about wild plants and food for free, so I was interested to hear how Julia H-P first got into foraging.

“I was pretty much born to it!” she says. “My father studied botany and zoology at Cambridge, and then became a GP in a rural practice in south east Wales. In those days, GPs still ‘did the rounds’ and had time to pause and appreciate their surroundings so my father would often come home with foraged plants and mushrooms for our tea. I remember him bringing home elvers fresh out of the local river once, but mother thought they were revolting, so that was not one of his better efforts!

“He was also very keen on seaweed, as am I, but it wasn’t until after he died that I made a rather significant discovery. I was going through his belongings when I came across a wonderful collection of seaweeds that he’d gathered from around Anglesey back in the 1930s. It is quite probable that some of these seaweeds no longer grow in the area, so I plan to donate them to the National Museum of Wales. They already have his beetle collection anyway!”

So what is it that’s so marvellous about seaweed, I wondered? Julia’s lovely country-style kitchen is draped with the stuff – all different shapes and sizes and colours, she breaks off bits and chews them as she talks and describes how she uses them in soups and stews. Her pantry is neatly stocked with jars of it too, and there are packs stored in the freezer.

“I use it a lot adding bits here and there to dishes as different seaweeds have different flavours and textures and, of course, being Welsh, I make lava bread! It takes some time to identify different seaweeds and to know how to clean and dry and store them, but if you are interested, you can buy books on it, or look it up – it’s all there online these days. And one of the great things about seaweed is you can just stop and try a bit – have a nibble on the beach if you want to – it is never going to harm you, none of it is poisonous.”

As well as appearing on the BBCs Countryfile earlier this month, Julia has been on other TV shows and, perhaps most memorably, been filmed sitting in a seaweed bath with The One Show presented Alex Jones! “Seaweed is terribly good for your skin,” Julia explains. “It is full of all sorts of vitamins and minerals, so run a good hot bath, stick in the seaweed and hey presto – a wonderful natural beauty treatment!” 

Multi-skilling seaweed!
We come across products containing seaweed quite often but are usually completely unaware of it. You will find it in some brands of cosmetics, ice cream, toothpaste and various food stuffs. It is also in bath preparations and is widely used as a fertilizer.

You can follow Julia’s foraging exploits here.

Her wild food festival here. 

Her new novel here. 

 

 

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