Giving it some welly!

When you live in the real countryside, ’sensible’ outdoor footwear is something of a necessity. True Devonians will always smile and say you can ‘spot the incomer’ a mile off by their inappropriate choices of heels, open toed or pale coloured shoes. You can buy all sorts of fancy boots but, at the end of the day, the wellington boot is the countryman’s footwear of choice!
WellyDrain

I shared this fun photo (right) on Facebook this week as it made me smile and think that Albert, the lead male in our Swaddlecombe Mysteries, would find this a good use of a leaking welly. In contrast, Victoria, our leading lady, would probably use a pair of old wellies as planters for some organic herbs…

So what’s the history of the wellington boot? How did this rubberised footwear come into being? The wellington boot is associated with Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington (1769-1852). The Iron Duke, as he was known, instructed his shoemaker, George Hoby to modify his hessian 18th-century boot and make it out of calfskin leather.

WellyMontageWellingtons first appeared in 1817 and proved popular with the troops because they were hard wearing for battle, yet comfortable for evening wear. The boot leather was treated with wax to make them softer and more waterproof. The new boots became a very popular fashion accessory for gentlemen. Considered fashionable and foppish in the best circles, they remained the main fashion for men throughout the 1840s.

American, Charles Goodyear (1800-1860), who invented a vulcanisation process for rubber, began making rubber boots. Hiram Hutchinson saw the potential for agricultural workers in France and bought the patent from Goodyear in 1852. The new waterproof boots were quick to become established and sold well within the large rural population. Amazingly, by 1857 the company were hand–making 14,000 pairs of boots per day!

Fellow American, Henry Lee Norris, moved to Edinburgh and started producing rubber wellington boots in 1856. Norris believed Scotland was a good place to manufacture wellingtons because of the country’s high rainfall – good decision! He founded the British Rubber Company and four former boot–makers from New York trained the Scottish workforce The company went into production first making rubber shoes and boots and then quickly expanding to produce an extensive range of rubber products, included tyres, golf balls and hot water bottles.

Come the outbreak of the First World War (1914- 1918) the trench war ensured high production of rubber boots and again, in the Second World War, the armed forces used vast quantities of rubber wellington boots.

And so to today, when the Wellington boot has gone full circle and become highly fashionable again. When I was a child, wearing wellies was deemed very boring. They were always plain black and not very comfy and you would go out of your way to avoid wearing them. Now, when we are so sophisticated with technology coming out of our ears, I find it amusing that something as simple as old-fashioned as a boot made out of rubber is so much in demand. You can have them in various designs and in any colour and, if you choose green ones, you can even spend a fortune on them!

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Children’s books – expanding imagination!

As an every-so-slightly doting grannie, I was very interested to read a recent BBC radio poll about which books most adults say every child should read. At the moment I read my granddaughter Grace Winnie the Pooh (the original, not the Disney version) and a lot of Spot the Dog books and ‘noisy’ books that have buttons to press that make different noises! She is not yet three, but I am already planning her future reading, so was interested to see what the top picks were in the poll…

… and it’s no surprise really that the poll suggested 26% of British adults think Harry Potter is the book they think every child should read, closely followed by Roald Dahl’s The BFG.

Top10BooksThe top ten list looks like this:

  • Harry Potter
  • The BFG
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  • The Famous Five
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar
  • The Wind in the Willows
  • The Gruffalo
  • The Lord of the Rings
  • The Bible

When people were asked why they chose any particular book, the most common answer was because it ‘expands imagination’, followed by the desire to pass on the pleasure they themselves got from reading it. Couldn’t agree more! Books are so wonderful to lose yourself in, whatever your age.

The top choices of books varied across the generations with Harry Potter (35%) and ‘The BFG’ (31%) the runaway favourites among 18-34-year-olds.

However, ‘The Famous Five’ (26%) and ‘The Wind and the Willows’ (25%) are the most common recommendations for those aged 55 plus – ahem, I think that’s me then! I adored ‘The Famous Five’ series and owned every one, and ‘The Wind and the Willows’ had me enchanted, and I still love it today.

To Kill a Mockingbird was chosen because it provides lessons about the world and because it helps to develop good moral character. It wasn’t a book I particularly enjoyed… but each to their own!

The poll showed that for the most part, choices are evenly split between the genders – however, The Famous Five is a more popular recommendation among women (22%) than men (15%), while The Lord of the Rings is more likely to be recommended by men (20%) than women (9%).

I was also thrilled to see that Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was listed. I wrote a blog about it in 2015 when it was the 150th anniversary of its publication and, since it was first published, it has never been out of print. It is the most fascinating story, simple and also complex, however you want to read it and a book that most certainly expands imagination.

What were your favourite childhood reads? And what did you read to your children or grandchildren? I’d love to hear!

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Malted Chocolate Cake

We decided we needed to celebrate the ongoing success of our latest Swaddlecombe Mystery novel ‘ A Fowl Murder’… and what better way to celebrate than with a cup of tea and homemade chocolate cake!

The recipe is by Mary Berry from her ‘Absolute Favourites’ cook book ­ – an excellent buy by the way!

Cake Ingredients

  • 30g (1oz) malted chocolate drink powder
  • 30g (1oz) cocoa powder
  • 225g (8oz) butter softened, plus extra for greasing
  • 225g (8oz) caster sugar
  • 225g (8oz) self raising flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 4 eggs

Icing Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp malted chocolate drink powder
  • 1 ½ tablespoons hot milk
  • 125g (4 ½ oz) butter, softened
  • 250g (9oz) icing sugar
  • 50g (2oz) dark chocolate, melted
  • 1 tbsp boiling water
  • 20+ Maltesers to decorate

Method

You will need 2 20cm (8 inch) round sandwich tins. Preheat oven to 180c/160 fan/Gas 4 and grease the tins with butter and line the bases with baking paper.

Measure the malted chocolate drink powder and cocoa powder into a large bowl, pour over 2 tablespoons of water and mix to a paste. Add the remaining cake ingredients and beat until smooth.

Divide evenly between the prepared tins and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes. Set aside in the tins to cool for 5 mins then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

To make the icing, measure the malted chocolate drink powder into a bow, add the hot milk and mix until smooth. Add the butter, icing sugar and melted chocolate and mix again until smooth, then add the boiling water to  give a gloss to the icing.

Place one cake on a plate and spread over half the icing. Sandwich with the other cake and spread (or pipe) the remaining icing on top using the tip of a rounded palette knife to create a swirled effect from the centre to the edge of the cake. Arrange the Maltesers over the top.

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A Murderous Success!

Well, what can I say other than ‘thank you’? My partner in crime writing, Julia, and I have been thrilled by the response to our latest novel, ‘A Fowl Murder’. It has sold incredibly well and the early reviews have all been very kind.

We have, tentatively, started thinking about a fourth novel in the series, set in the winter time. However, we both lead fairly hectic lives and have all sorts of other projects ‘on the go’, so we need to sit down and discuss it further…

Of course, the talking and the plotting is the fun bit! We both enjoy creating new characters and thinking up dastardly ends for some poor unsuspecting soul or other. Writing as a team has distinct advantages – egging each other on when the going gets tough, but has disadvantages too – as when continuity gets scrambled and characters have been known to change name or completely vanish!

Going over and over your work and editing and correcting can be a hard slog and cups of tea tend to mysteriously change into glasses of wine every now and then… and then of course, there’s the need for all the cake baking and recipe testing to ensure authenticity! It can be a tough job…

There’s also the fear of arrest. Julia was sitting in a pub garden discussing a potential plot idea with a friend and said: “I really don’t know if we could get away with stabbing him. It’s too obvious, perhaps poison might be better?” At which point, her friend pointed out that a passing waiter has turned pale and has now having an urgent whispered discussion with a colleague. A flurry of embarrassed explanation followed, and she was able to leave after her drink with nothing more than suspicious glances, and not in handcuffs.

I have been known to wander around garden centres asking about the poisonous potential of plants and shrubs. I may even have used my Granddaughter, Grace, as the reason for my concern, disgraceful!

And so, dear readers, if you ever hear of two middle aged women from Devon being held in custody, you will come and explain, won’t you…?

 

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A Fowl Murder

 At last – ‘A Fowl Murder’ – book three in the Swaddlecombe series, is being published next weekend! Victoria and Albert are back and you can catch up on their latest adventures.

To whet your appetite, here’s the synopsis from the book jacket:

———

As her first summer in rural Devon draws to a close, Victoria West feels comfortably settled and her relationship with farmer Albert Moreton is jogging along nicely… but then death comes a–calling.

A work colleague from Victoria’s ‘old’ life in London appears on the scene and life starts to get complicated. An article on breeding chickens somehow draws Victoria and Albert into a web of jealousy, lies and murder. There’s a catastrophe over the canapés and plenty more shocks in store in the third Swaddlecombe adventure.

As ever, the locals add plenty of colour to this the cosy British murder mystery. Will pub landlord Roger ever be able to face a cup of coffee again? Can Victoria keep clear of the clutches of sleazy Morris Podger and will Albert manage to bake a gluten-free cake?

——— 

Thank you all so much for your patience, support and kind words. A Fowl Murder has, for all sorts of reasons, taken much longer to publish than we had hoped. My partner in crime writing, Julia, and myself hope that it brings you suspense and laughter in equal amounts… and that you think it has been worth the wait!

The paperback will be available on my website and on Kindle very shortly and I will let you all have the link as soon as it is ready!

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