A swim on the wild side!

This week, our guest blogger is my very own youngest daughter – Emily! She has been home from university for a few weeks before going away for six months on a work placement. While here, she was able to spend some time with old school friends and head off to the beach… where she had an interesting encounter!

“The sun put in a rare appearance, so I decided to head down to Babbacombe beach and enjoy a dip in the sea with some friends. As always, the British sea proved to be a lot colder than we remembered, but we took the plunge and swam out towards the five-knot-buoy. 

Suddenly, we spotted a smooth, dark shape gliding just below the water surface. We turned and a head popped up, watching us with large, dark eyes. We were so excited, it’s so rare to see a seal in the wild, let alone swim with one!

The large grey seal known as “Sammy” is a regular visitor at Babbacombe, coming almost daily to coax the locals into giving him the fish they catch off the quayside. Now that’s what I call smart – let the humans do the hard work, so you don’t have to! Recently featured in the local paper, Sammy worried locals a few weeks ago when he swam up to the quay with a hook in his side, although he left before the RSPCA had arrived. We can only presume he was protected by his thick hide. 

After a while we got out of the water to fetch our cameras and ran to the quayside where the seal was cruising up and down waiting for fish. He seemed hugely tame and was content to come within an arm’s length of us, even gently taking a fish straight from a fisherman’s hand! It was just fascinating to watch such a large creature (it looked to be about one and a half metres long and at least half a metre wide) move so gracefully in the water!

It had to be the best trip to the beach ever, and we plan to head back tonight and see if he’s still there!”

1 Comment

A summer tea party…

It’s so sad that the popularity of afternoon tea has gone down massively over the years. It’s a great way of entertaining people as cakes, pastries and scones can all be made well in advance and are all far less expensive than a dinner party! Here are a couple of ideas for summer tea parties that you might like to try – let’s keep the tradition alive!

Squirrel Cake

This is a recipe of my mother’s and, although there are no nuts in the cake mixture it nevertheless tastes very nutty and delicious! It is also economical to make.

To make a 17.5cm (7in) cake, you will need:

  • 100g (4oz) margarine
  • 100g (4oz) sugar
  • 100g (4oz) self-raising flour
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 15ml (1 tbsp) cold water
  • 10g (2 tsp) instant coffee granules

For the Squirrel’s Cream:

  • 425ml (3/4 pint) double cream
  • 45ml (3 tbsp) Tia Maria liqueur
  • 45ml (3 tbsp) chopped hazelnuts, plus extra for decoration

Grease and line two 17.5cm (7in) sponge tins. Cream together the margarine and sugar until white and creamy. Add the beaten eggs a little at a time and beat well (no cheating with an electric mixer – the results are much better by hand!). Using a metal spoon, fold in the sifted flour and add the cold water until a soft consistency is reached. At the very last moment fold in instant coffee granules.

Spoon the mixture into the two sandwich tins and spread evenly with a palette knife. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 190ºC (375ºF), gas mark 5, for about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven when they are cooked and turn out onto a wire rack to cool. When cold, sandwich the two cakes together with the Squirrel’s Cream (see below).

Squirrel’s Cream

Whip the cream and add a little sugar if you wish. Fold in the Tia Maria and the hazelnuts. Use as a filling and decoration on the top of the cake. Sprinkle the top of the cake with extra hazelnuts

—————-

Lemon & Mint Cooler

Old-fashioned lemonade is delicious and much better for you than the commercially available varieties, so do try some.

You will need:

  • 2.5 litres (4 ¼ pints) water
  • Juice of 8 lemons
  • 75g (3oz) castor sugar
  • Large handful of mint leaves
  • Extra mint leaves for garnishing

Chop the mint leaves coarsely and place in a large bowl with the sugar. Pound the two ingredients together well so that the sugar takes up the flavour of the mint leaves. Heat the water to boiling point and pour over the mint and sugar. Add the lemon juice and leave to cool.

When cooled, carefully strain it through a fine sieve and chill in the fridge. Serve in the prettiest glasses you can find, garnish with ice, slivers of lemon and sprigs of mint.

 

6 Comments

Visiting Amish country…

We have just returned from America – primarily to attend the CHA craft/trade show but also to take a few days break. This time we decided to do a road trip with our friends Randy and Cheryl from Michigan and we headed out to Amish country in Indiana.

I am fascinated by the Amish, I admire their courage in trying to live yesterday’s life in today’s world and their tenacity to stand out and be different. Having said that I won’t be turning Amish any time soon as I love my computer, phone, electricity and female emancipation! I love being able to get into my mini and zoom off whenever and wherever I like, picturesque though these horse and buggies are.

The Amish people are gentle and friendly towards tourists and I was even able to have dinner one day in an Amish home and spend a lot of time exploring the real meaning of being Amish. One of the huge highlights for me was mooching around in Amish quilt stores and craft shops… oh their quilting! Some even extend their quilting to the garden and you can see here a patchwork piece made from flowers – some lovely ideas and inspiration to be found.

The other obvious passion the Amish have is home baking – mmm, the pies and the cookies, the sweets and the home made bread – so good for the diet Joanna (ok not..) A frequent item on their menu is home made bread spread with a peanut butter, marshmallow and honey mix… oo-err low calorie or what!

I came home with a lot of interesting spice mixes and my mind buzzing with ideas for recipes and quilting themes… and a really different view of how life can be lived.

11 Comments

Peaches and Cream

I just love this rubber stamp – in fact I love the whole range of fruity/kitchen/recipe stamps we have. This particular stamp is from a sheet called Spiced Peaches and has a lovely recipe included as well.

The design idea behind this card is such an easy one for you to have a go with – just using a die cut shape – stamp the image and colour (go Promarkers!) and then soften the edges with some of the Old Paper or other soft beige Distress Ink pads.

While we are talking Distress Ink pads – many of you will have tried to use them with the Inkessentials Blending Tool – which is a good piece of kit, but I have to say I have found the Inkylicious Duster brushes so much easier. The brushes come in a set of three and they have made me a lot keener to use the Distress Inks around the edge of my cards and I agree this can add a lovely texture and effect. Now I feel happy that I can achieve it with no blips I am doing it so much more often!

Soft, pretty cards are always well received, as I am sure this one would be… of course if you were feeling really generous you could make a jar of spiced peaches as a gift to go with the car… or not!

4 Comments

Busy bees

Spending so much time with flowers over the years, I’m a great respecter of bees. When you’re in your garden, it’s rare not to hear their gentle drone. I would never keep bees and respect them though I do… no way could I have ‘pet’ bees!

The big, slow moving bumble bee doesn’t produce much honey but it is an important pollinator. The smaller honey bee not only pollinates but also toils away to produce honey from the pollen it collects.

I knew bees were vital, but I was surprised when I read that one in three mouthfuls of the food we eat is dependent on pollination – so worrying when we are told that honeybee numbers have fallen by up to 30% in recent years

Honey, and the bees that create it, are both pretty amazing! Honeybees are the only insects to produce food for humans and honey is the only food that includes all the substances necessary to sustain life, including enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and water.

And wow, do ‘worker’ honey bees deserve their name! The average worker bee produces about one twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in her lifetime. She visits 50 to 100 flowers during a collection trip… and as you will have gathered it is the female of the species that does all the work!

Larger than the worker bees, the male honey bees (also called drones), have no stinger and do no work at all. All they do is mate. Now there’s a surprise!! (Sorry all you guys that read the blog……..)

 

 

3 Comments