Homemade bread

I have been making my own soup for years and we have long been thinking we might try making homemade bread to go with the soup – instant homemade lunches!

However this good idea was shelved along with so many others we have, as we got busier and busier. Then whilst at my sister’s house last week we got up one morning to the most amazing smell of bread .. I wondered if she had one of those part-baked loaves in the oven or some frozen croissants, but this really was a very strong scent… enough to raise Richard into an enthusiastic early breakfast!

Kate (my sister) assured us it was real home made bread, courtesy of her bread making machine and it was sitting waiting for us to road test the latest loaf. Cutting a long and delicious story short, it was wonderful and Richard especially, was madly keen as he loves bread and cheese or bread and soup even more than I do.

So courtesy of Amazon we pressed a button and this machine arrived a day or so later. Richard has now taken full control and it is obviously going to be a man thing, a bit like the BBQ. However you will hear no complaints from me – it’s lovely to share the cooking.

We have tried three different recipes this week: a French bread (delicious but a different shape to usual French bread obviously!), a standard white and a 50/50% wholemeal and white and I can honestly say that every crumb has been consumed and little Grace, our granddaughter, gave an enthusiastic thumbs up to the ‘Grandpa’ bread she ate for lunch today.

We chose the Panasonic SD-2511 as that’s what my sister had – seemed easier than choosing a different one and it not being as good. Then all you really need to keep in the cupboard is strong flour, water, salt, dried yeast and a touch of butter. There are plenty of other things you can add but the basics have worked well so far.

I have bought several books on machine bread making and I think we will be trying loaves with delicious little extras like olives or pecan nuts and maple syrup soon. But for now, I think it is unlikely we will bother to buy much regular bread from the supermarket as we just love having it all set on a timer and having that smell of baking bread first thing in the morning.

 

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Wildflower wonderland

After a pretty fraught day, it was lovely to go for an evening stroll yesterday and to feel the warmth of the sun, listen to the birds singing and enjoy the fabulous wildflowers.

I think we all know Devon is a beautiful county but, in the month of May, it really comes into its own. The hedgerows, banks and woodlands are full of wildflowers – bluebells, red campion, stitchwort, wild garlic… the list is endless.

My own garden is starting to look pretty good, but there is something so magical about the display nature can produce all on her own. Yes, I know you can see tropical blooms and exotic birds in other parts of the world but for me, there is nothing to beat the English countryside in May.

What’s your favourite wildflower?

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Sweet peas are fabulous flowers!

 

I think sweet peas are fabulous flowers, wonderful to grow in your garden and brilliant to have as cut flowers in your house, full of such beautiful scent. If it had been practical I would have loved to have sweet peas everywhere for our wedding, they look so romantic and pretty – but umm, a December wedding? I don’t think so!

This card uses a couple of very popular Signature dies, Victoria Lace (SD308) and Sweet Pea (SD466) with a few other bits and bobs and produces the prettiest of birthday cards (or anytime card).

Ingredients:

  • 6” square white card blank
  • Signature dies, Victoria Lace and Sweet Pea
  • Some pale backing paper we chose green
  • Cardstock in white and pink and pale green
  • Photocorners or a photo corner die
  • Decorative oval dies (like Spellbinders or similar)
  • Preprinted sentiment, scrap of pink gingham and some pearls

Quick ‘how to’:

  1. Trim some backing paper slightly smaller than the card blank. Die cut a scalloped oval in white, the Victoria Lace in white and the photo corners if you are using a die.
  2. Die cut a decorative oval in strong pink and create the “V” shaped pieces by hand with sharp scissors.
  3. Now assemble the card by sticking the backing paper to the card blank (I use double sided tape) then add the pink oval using Pinflair glue gel so it is slightly raised. Once the glue is dry, take a sharp craft knife and make a cut and slide in the small V shaped pieces each side to give the effect that they go right through.
  4. Add the scalloped oval using glue gel again. Die cut the sweet peas in pale green and white and colour the white flowers with alcohol ink pens. Attach the green first and then snip the flowers away from the white die cut, and layer these over the green die cut using glue gel.
  5. Attach the Victoria Lace diecut, use something like a quickie glue pen or glossy accents or cosmic acrylic glue, whatever you have in stock.
  6. Finish the card with the embellishments, the ribbon bow, corners, sentiment and pearls.
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When food gets weird…!

I always find it interesting how dishes and styles of food go in and out of fashion and how, sometimes, food gets weird! The Elizabethans had their sweetmeats while the Victorians used oysters in almost everything. Obviously, recipes reflect the cost and availability of ingredients – oysters used to be cheap, while chicken was a luxury.

I love reading about food and I was chuckling over some funny terms recently…

Fusion
A few years ago, ‘fusion’ cookery was all the rage. This always sounded a bit too much like physics to me, but it was the combination of various forms of cookery, so you might have South Asian and Pacific Rim, or Texan and Mexican (Tex-Mex). This is fine it theory, but chefs do get a bit carried away. I remember reading about curried porridge, spaghetti tacos and Japanese Scotch eggs. Hmmm…

Chocolate soil, copyright www.epicurus.com

Soil
One of the very ‘on-trend’ additions to posh restaurant dishes at the moment is soil. I think our friends on Masterchef are probably responsible for introducing this one! Call me old-fashioned (and people do!) but I instantly think of my flowerbeds, and I’m not sure I want a version of this, no matter how delicious, on my plate. It’s just… odd. Mostly, it is dark chocolate and I’d be a lot happier if we stuck to ‘sprinkles’ or possibly even ‘shavings.’ If you want to have a go at making some chocolate soil, there are recipes online. Here’s one from www.epicurus.com

Hand salad
Yes, I know, weird! Apparently, it’s just a salad you eat with your hands, dipping lettuce and cucumber into dressings. So really, it’s simply an American term for what we used to call crudités – dipping veg into dips and sauces. Here’s a recipe idea for hand salad from www.bonappetit.com

A nice bit of hand salad with buttermilk, grapefruit, and mixed seeds, copyright www.bonappetit.com

There are so many trendy terms out there, I sometimes feel I need a translation app to find out what’s on the menu!

Jus ­– why can’t we call it gravy or sauce any more?

Pithivier of chicken, squash and sage by Sally Abé, copyright www.greatbritishchefs.com

Pithivier – it’s a pie! If you want to make a posh pie, have a look here at www.greatbritishchefs.com

Foam – this isn’t quite as bad as soil, but… Anyway, it applies to things that are full of air bubbles… we used to call them things like whipped cream, meringue or mousse!

Deconstructed – this one makes me smile! All the ingredients of a classic dish, but the chef didn’t want to assemble it!

Big dipper
I had to sneak this one in as it left me speechless! For Easter this year, a certain supermarket was offering ostrich eggs for sale. They recommended 50 mins cooking time to produce a runny yolk, perfect for dipping into, like a large, vegetarian fondue. They even suggested using a baguette as a ‘soldier’ I don’t know why… but that struck me as very peculiar!

 

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Bring a ‘Get well soon’ smile!

Never underestimate the power of friendly or loving messages when someone is under the weather, be they seriously ill or just down with a nasty old sniffle! If you are feeling sorry for yourself, it’s amazingly cheering to know that someone cares enough to not only send you a card but to have made it especially for you too. Because we are all so ‘into’ card making, I think it’s easy to forget how impressive a handmade card can be.

I recently gave a ‘Good luck in your new house’ card to someone I only know a little –and they were amazed. I guess I take cardmaking for granted. So use your skills and share them to make someone’s day!

This card shows yet again how very handy dies can be. There are so many ways of using them and you can always rely on the finish looking professional.

You only need lilac/mauve cardstock and cream/white card to make this, which is always a bonus. Obviously, you can use any colour you have in stock. It’s a bit like reading a recipe and thinking ‘oh good I’ve got all those ingredients’, the limited colour palette makes it much easier to use as inspiration!

Ingredients:

Cut some Grace Borders in cream, and the Get Well die in your second colour, obviously lilac here. Cut some lilac card smaller than the card blank leaving a reasonable sized margin. Then a layer of cream card a tiny bit smaller and a further layer of lilac.

Attach the Grace lace along each edge (I use a quickie glue pen or glossy accents) and trim neatly. Now place the oval shape on the centre of the card using foam pads or glue gel. Stick on the Get Well Soon (using same glues as I have already mentioned) and decorate the sentiment with a few flat backed pearls. Finally, add the chiffon bow at the top. Hey presto!

 

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