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A vintage anniversary card

I had such fun making this card as I adore all things vintage… if there’s a chance of making a project slightly vintage I grab it! It’s no challenge to make the gorgeous images on the Barbara Anderson pads a little bit vintage. They are all vintage collages and I just love her work.

There are twelve different images in the pad and two of each design. For this card I have taken borders from both of the sheets featuring this design and I will use the remaining topper on another card withouta border. One border is at the top (placed upside down to get the heaviest concentration of roses) and the other at the base of the card. The sentiments come on the sheet too.

I have embellished each side of the main image with the Signature dies Tessa lace edger and stuck it onto the main card using foam tape to give it a lift.

That’s when I started playing – oh I do love old button! My mother had a button box and as a child I adored just going through it and ‘sorting’ the buttons. I still have the box and add to it when I can. I showed it to Grace the other day and she stared at me as though I was talking a foreign language.

“But what does it do Granny?”

“Oh you just choose your favourites and sort them into colours, it’s great fun.”

“Why don’t you play with that granny while I play with Grandpa.”

OK… point taken 21st century children think you are nuts for sorting buttons! Will they even learn how to sew on a button? Who knows.

I used glue gel to secure the buttons, you need a fairly good sized blob to hold them in place. It doesn’t work trying to use something like a quickie glue pen.

Have fun – meanwhile I’ll just sit here sorting my buttons…

 

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Simple pleasures…

As we get older, I think we become more aware of ‘simple’ pleasures’, well I know I do! The smell of coffee brewing, freshly cut grass or hearing an owl hoot – all simple things that give immense pleasure.

I read the other day that Vita Sackville-West (she of Sissinghurst Garden fame, amongst other things…) used the term ‘through leaves’ to describe simple pleasures enjoyed by her family. She coined the phrase after “the small but intense pleasure of kicking through leaves while out walking”, which I thought was rather lovely.

Another classic, that I expect almost all of us know, are the lyrics to the song ‘My favourite things’ from the Sound of Music, including whiskers on kittens, warm woollen mittens and brown paper packages tied up with string.

It’s so easy to think that pleasures have to be big and expensive, like holidays, or fancy clothes… but I think we start to appreciate the simple things the more we experience life. You often hear people who have survived cancer, or cheated death in an accident or natural disaster, say how they appreciate every day, every moment, and are more aware of what’s around them.

I had a think about my ‘through leaves’ moments, and came up with the following list:

  • The smell of baking bread (thanks to Richard and his bread maker!)
  • Little Grace running towards me with her arms open
  • A beautiful sunset (or dawn, but that’s rare!)
  • Hearing my daughters say a casual I love you
  • Finishing a card and sitting back and thinking – that’s a keeper!

My co-author Julia was here (we were busy having a book signing session!) and I asked her, for her ‘Through leaves’ moments and she said:

  • Standing in the middle of her runner bean arch(!)
  • Being greeted by her dog, Moss, in the morning
  • Watching beech leaves unfurl in spring
  • Walks on frosty mornings
  • Birdsong

So what are your ‘through leaves’ moments? Do let me know… smiles, Joanna

 

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A murmuration…

If you have ever been lucky enough to see a murmuration of starlings – where the birds swoop and swirl in amazing aerial ballet creating patterns in the sky – it’s not something you are likely to forget. But have you ever wondered why it is called a ‘murmuration’?

You were probably too enchanted by the magical sight to notice the ongoing background murmur – or murmuration – as caused by the beating of 10,000 pairs of wings at once. And that’s where the term comes from. Most of the collective nouns we use date back to the mid-15th century. But the origins of most collective bird and animal nouns are not always as straightforward as they first appear.

Some are named after specific habits, such as ‘a descent of woodpeckers’, possibly due to their penchant for dropping down from great heights onto ants or ‘a leap of leopards’ or ‘a busyness of ferrets’ while others focus on a personality trait that we believe them to possess.

For instance, the number of sinister sounding nouns for crows, such as murder, mob and horde, probably come from medieval peasants’ fears that the mean-looking birds had been sent by the Devil or were witches in disguise.

Similarly, ‘an unkindness of ravens’ could stem from an old misguided belief that the birds were not caring parents, sometimes expelling their young from their nests before they were ready.

Many bird species have more than one collective noun. As with crows, there are many terms to describe finches (charm, trembling and trimming) and geese, depending on whether they’re flying (skein, wedge, nide) or gathered on water (plump) or land (gaggle).

A book by Chloe Rhodes An Unkindness of Ravens: A Book of Collective Nouns is fascinating. In it she explains that, unlike proverbs, rhymes or homilies, many of these delightful names endure because they were recorded and published in ‘Books of Courtesy’ – handbooks designed to educate the nobility. So an early sort of ‘one upmanship’ to ensure you made it plain you belonged to the ‘right’ set, something like the Sloane Ranger speak of the 1980s perhaps!

Here are some of my favourite bird terms:

  • A wake of buzzards
  • A commotion of coots
  • A murder of crows
  • An asylum of cuckoos
  • A swatting of flycatchers
  • A prayer of godwits
  • A conspiracy of ravens
  • A parliament of rooks
  • An exultation of skylarks
  • A murmuration of starlings
  • A chime of wrens
  • A booby of nuthatches
  • A quilt of eiders
  • A mischief of magpies
  • A wisdom of owls
  • A committee of terns
  • A descent of woodpeckers
  • A scold of jays
  • A charm of goldfinches
  • A fall of woodcock
  • A deceit of lapwings
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More seaside memories

As the last blog featured lost ice creams, I thought we should continue the theme of seaside memories but instead of cards, here are a couple of 3D projects that you can make using the Signature dies.

There are lots of inexpensive frames you can buy that are deep 3D designs. This beach scene would look lovely in a child’s bedroom or perhaps just the thing for a bathroom. Just like making a card, you build up the picture and I use Pinflair glue gel for attaching the die cuts as you can add height with larger blobs of glue. We have quite a few beach related designs in our section ‘On the Beach’, so you could chop and change the ingredients to suit you. Perhaps a set of three pictures featuring different beachy scenes would look nice?

Likewise, this wooden plaque makes a pretty ornament. How about hanging it from the door knob or drawer front? It’s an MDF base with the string stapled to the back. You can then add whatever ingredients you fancy. I love the ice cream image, so many happy memories!

Before I redecorated, I had a completely beach-inspired theme for one of my bathrooms. Red and white life belts as towel rings (ok they were bought not made!), a lighthouse lamp in one corner and baskets of beautiful shells! I have collected pretty shells for years and have oodles of them. My towels were striped red and white and blue and white, and the bath mat was cork so looked vaguely beachy! Now I have a much more traditional lavender and roses theme – rather predictable, but I love the big arrangement I created using dried roses and bunches of lavender for the windowsill and pretty towels embroidered with lavender.

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A dropped ice cream!

‘A dropped ice cream is a seagull’s dream’ – these words made me smile. Nearby in Teignmouth, there’s a lovely promenade where you can walk along next to the sea and relax – we love walking there and often take friends and visitors. The only drawback really is the number of seagulls. I love all the parts of the British seaside… but gulls hmm not so much really.

If you live near the sea then seagulls can be quite difficult. My parents’ bungalow had a persistent seagull that nested in their chimney several years running and when the eggs hatched she became quite over protective and territorial. Fine, I’m a mother, I understand your feelings, but aghhh! This meant we were dive bombed arriving at the house, the postie was more scared of the seagull than any dogs and my poor father trying to trim the climbing plants up the side of the house, resorted to trying to trim with one hand and hold up an open umbrella over his head with the other! They are also VERY noisy.

Whilst walking down the prom at Teignmouth, we have often been beset by scavenging seagulls. Tina Dorr, our newsletter editor and I were quietly looking forward to a couple of gorgeous clotted cream ice creams we had just purchased. Ok, I admit we were probably talking and not looking at the ice cream – but 30 seconds later – whoosh… speed of light! Two thieving seagulls and the balls of ice cream on top of the cones … gone. We had to laugh as we gazed down at our empty cones! However, they are part and parcel of our British coastal areas and so I will have to put up with them!

This card could be for a birthday – or perhaps I should just send it to Tina as a laugh at a shared memory! The seagulls are a signature die and, to save you colouring, the beach huts have been die cut in striped card. The backing paper is just carefully slit and the ice cream posted into the layers. The card measures 170mm square, just under 7 inches.

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