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Why butterflies are best!

Butterflies are unendingly popular – and not just popular with us crafters, but also the world. They are beautiful fragile fluttery little things (and sometimes not so little) that captivate us all.

Butterflies also demonstrate so well how a very average looking young person can change into a real beauty as they mature – sadly it sometimes works the other way too and stunning little Hollywood starlets can look wonderfully average as adults!

For those of us fascinated by crafting, of any type, the butterfly has many good points. They are beautiful in shape and colour and can be the focus of any project, blending with any natural world theme. But the best – and I mean THE best – reason why I use butterflies so often is that they are the best mistake coverer uppers (is that a word?!) ever

So many times I have slipped with the glue, designed something and then hated the spacing, or had a helpful animal or small child add a pawprint or handprint that I needed to cover to save my projects. Enter the butterfly either in 2D or 3D and your project is saved.

I have often cut a little extra butterfly out and used it to make the card better balanced. As I mentioned I have covered marks/glue that shouldn’t be visible, but also adding a butterfly can just give your project that perfect finish and extra lift. These Jane Shasky butterflies come in a pad brimming with little butterflies and you can use them as the focal points like these examples or grab one to flutter on the side of a topper to make something wonderful!

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Milking it…

Lovely local milk in glass bottles in the village shop!

Sometimes, you just have to give a wry smile and resist saying anything… this was my reaction when I overheard some earnest 20-somethings discussing the environmental benefits of buying milk in a glass bottle from our local shop and what a brilliant development this was. It IS an excellent development and the aim of reducing plastic use is long overdue… but it’s hardly new!

As a child, I used to listen out for the hum of the milk float – a battery-driven vehicle (gosh, how very ‘green’!) and the clink of our pints of milk being delivered to the porch. There was always the rush to get to the bottles before the blue tits had pecked through the lids and got at the cream on the top! Amazingly… we even used to recycle back in the dark ages of the 1950s too! Every housewife would wash out her ‘empties’ and put them back on the step for them to be replaced with new bottles of fresh milk the next day.

We collected the silver foil caps and recycled them (care of Blue Peter appeals) and the trusty milkman provided an excellent neighbourhood watch facility, spotting when anything was amiss if a householder didn’t take in their milk. He also sold eggs, bread and tinned goods, amongst other things, and must have been an absolute lifeline for elderly customers. Fancy that – home grocery deliveries! Now, where have I seen that recently?

It is lovely to see milk in bottles back in my local shop although the realisation that the bottles were one litre rather than one pint took me a moment – I couldn’t understand why they seemed so large! The milk is from a local dairy so there’s no problem with ‘food miles’ and the cows that produced the milk would have been grazing in fields quite nearby. Who knows where the milk in our supermarkets comes from? And it seems sometimes we can’t even believe the cheery information on the label as some supermarket ‘farms’ are completely fictitious.

It sometimes seems to me that we rush headlong into new ideas and don’t think about the possible side effects, as with the dominance of the supermarkets and the loss of milk rounds and many of our high street shops. But most developments are, of course, huge improvements and we must be open to change. However, I for one will be very pleased if the milkman and his humming milk float make a return to our streets, perhaps other much-missed aspects of earlier decades will come back too…

 

 

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Grace goes gardening!

We have a sad little 4-year old here that has been so poorly with scarlet fever, but I am happy to say she is recovering well. I rather thought scarlet fever had disappeared and was an illness from my childhood era, but it seems not and several of her friends at the nursery have had it as well.

So despite being definitely on the mend, she is still fragile and not up for the usual high jinks with Grandpa down by the swing or any rough and tumble. So one of the things Richard organised with her was some gardening and the early planting of vegetable seeds ready for summer.

It only took a few demonstrations for her to catch on how to plant them and as she explained to me later, it was a bit like putting the seeds to bed! So we now have runner beans (Scarlet Emperor and Guinness Record), radishes and cos lettuce. Several varieties of tomato, including one that promises faithfully to be blight resistant – the jury is still out on that one – and Grace’s favourite… Nasturtiums using last year’s seeds from the plants which she had kept in an envelope over the winter.

I love the fact that she understands where vegetables come from, as she and I stood in the conservatory and watched Grandpa plant out the first early potatoes, she chattered away about how she hoped the rabbits wouldn’t steal our crops this year – too many episodes of Peter Rabbit and Mr McGregor on the TV there I think!

It is such a privilege to be able to spend time with a little mind, we heard today which primary school she has been allocated (her parents first choice – yay!) and I just have to wonder where the past few years have gone – but a lovely time to share with my family.

 

 

 

 

 

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Are there fairies at the bottom of your garden?

The ‘real’ fairy house Julia found on Dartmoor!

Your response to my recent Fairy Doors products shows just how popular these little folk are! Even in 2018, there are signs of fairy life as discovered by my partner in crime writing, Julia, when she moved to a new village on Dartmoor. On one of her first exploratory walks with her dog, Moss, she came across two wooden fairy doors in the base of a living tree. Fascinated, she has kept her eye on this magical phenomenon as she passes the tree at least once a week… She has seen tiny figures come and go, little offerings left at Christmas and Easter, and coins pressed into cracks in the tree’s bark. Yet, she has never seen anyone else nearby…!

Intrigued, I decided to have a scoot about online and see what other fairy evidence I could come up with…

Most of us think of fairies as beautiful, tiny creatures, flitting about on gossamer wings, – but history and folklore tell a different tale. When belief in fairies was common most people didn’t dare mention them by name and referred to them as the Little People or the Hidden People. Many explanations have been given for belief in fairies. Some say that they are like ghosts, spirits of the dead, or fallen angels, neither bad enough for Hell nor good enough for Heaven. There are hundreds of different kinds of fairies – some are minute creatures, others grotesque – some can fly, and all can appear and disappear at will.

Sometimes the term fairy is used to describe any magical creature, including goblins or gnomes, while at others it describes a specific type of more ethereal creature or sprite. As so often happens when I look into ‘traditions’, I find that the Victorians are largely responsible! They were the ones who made fairies tiny and twee… resulting in fairy tales for children. It was during the Victorian and Edwardian eras when fairies were extremely popular that winged fairies became the norm. In folklore, wings were very rare and even tiny fairies flew by magic, sometimes flying on ragwort stems or the backs of birds.

Hobgoblins are guardian fairies – they are the useful ones that secretly come and do housework and odd jobs around the house. Unfortunately, they never seem to come and visit me! In Aberdeenshire, Scotland they are hideous to look at, they have no separate toes or fingers and in the Scottish Lowlands, they have a hole instead of a nose. Banshees are less common and more sinister, they usually only appear to foretell a tragedy. Goblins and Bug-a-boos are always malignant – and we should avoid them if possible!

Most of the nature fairies are probably descendants of pre-Christian gods and goddesses or are the spirits of trees and streams. Black Annis, a blue-faced hag, haunts the Dane Hills in Leicestershire and Gentle Annie who governs storms in the Scottish lowlands, are believed to be descended from the Celtic goddess Danu, mother of Ireland’s cave fairies. Mermaids and mermen, river spirits and spirits of pools, are the most common nature fairies.

A famous fairy story

One of the most famous fairy stories, and the photos that we have probably all seen was of the Cottingley Fairies who appeared in a series of five photographs taken by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths two young cousins who lived in Cottingley, near Bradford. In 1917, when the first two photographs were taken, Elsie was 16 and Frances was 9. The pictures came to the attention of world-famous writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (he of Sherlock Holmes fame), who used them to illustrate an article on fairies he had been commissioned to write for the Christmas 1920 edition of The Strand Magazine. Doyle, as a spiritualist, was enthusiastic about the photographs and interpreted them as clear and visible evidence of psychic phenomena. Public reaction was mixed – some accepted the images as genuine, but others believed they had been faked.

Interest in the Cottingley Fairies gradually faded after 1921. Both girls married and lived abroad for a time after they grew up, yet the photographs continued to hold the public imagination. In 1966 a reporter from the Daily Express newspaper traced Elsie, who had by then returned to the UK. She left open the possibility that she believed she had photographed her thoughts, and the media once again became interested in the story and I can remember reading about it myself and wishing the photos were genuine.

In the early 1980s Elsie and Frances, by then very old ladies, finally admitted that the photographs were faked, using cardboard cutouts of fairies copied from a popular children’s book of the time, but Frances maintained that the fifth and final photograph was genuine. The photographs and two of the cameras used are on display in the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford.

How extraordinary that such a hoax could go on for so long, even deceiving Sherlock Holmes’ creator. It just goes to prove how many of us dearly wanted to believe it was genuine and to believe in fairies… do you?

 

 

 

 

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Hand made soap – good clean fun!

Hand making anything is always very rewarding – and making your own soap is no exception. Not only can you create your own perfect scent combo, but you get to make a mess and play with lovely gooey stuff before turning out some beautiful end products! Not just a great treat for you, but also ideal gifts for friends and family – what’s not to love?

When she’s not looking after the company’s bookkeeping, caring for her young children or baking cakes… my bookkeeper Jo Bridgeman likes to turn her hand to different crafts. Recently, she’s been experimenting with making her own soaps and, in true Jo B style, has turned out some super results! She kindly brought in some of her fragrant bath bombs and soaps and let me have the details so you could all have a try. It is really quite a straightforward process and, once you’ve made an initial investment in some soap moulds, the world’s your lather! 

Cedar Wood & Honey soap

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 3/4 cup oats
  • Cedar wood essential oil

Method:

  1. Cut Melt and Pour Soap Base into cubes and add to a microwaveable bowl. Microwave on high for 30 seconds. Then microwave at 10 second increments, stirring in between, until melted.
  2. Mix in oats. Pour into a silicone soap mould.
  3. Drizzle honey into each soap mould and swirl it around with the end of a spoon – make sure you mix it in well or you’ll get a sticky mess! Let the mixture set for 40 minutes to 1 hour.
  4. Remove from soap mould by turning the mould upside down and gently pushing on the back of each soap.

Rose Bathbomb

Making your own bath bombs is simple and uses safe ingredients, so it is a fun thing to work on with young children. Just remember that citric acid will sting if it gets into cuts or scratches and will also be very irritating to the eyes.

Ingredients:

  • 300g bicarbonate of soda
  • 100g citric acid
  • 10ml Rose essential oil
  • Dried rose petals
  • Water

Method:

  1. Measure out the bicarbonate of soda and the citric acid into a mixing bowl, sieving if necessary and thoroughly mix together. Stir in a few rose petals.
  2. Add the essential oil to the mixture, mix in quickly and thoroughly.
  3. Now, working the mixture all the time, spray a little water on with a hand sprayer. Mix continuously to avoid it fizzing-up in the bowl and only add enough water for the mixture to hold together when lightly squeezed in your hand. It should JUST hold together and not be too damp.
  4. Once this point is reached you need to work quickly to compress the mixture into your moulds. Jo has used a rose-shaped mould to compliment the rose scent.
  5. As a finishing touch, sprinkle dried rose petals over the bath bombs.

You could use all kinds of moulds including something simple like ice-cube trays or small yoghurt pots, silicone baking moulds, cup cakes etc. Have fun!

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