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The merry merry month of May!

Forgive me if I am repeating myself… but I LOVE May! It is the month when spring reaches its zenith and summer just starts to sneak in with (hopefully!) some extra warmth…

This year has been very odd with a horribly cold and wet early spring meaning the poor trees and plants seem to have gone into overdrive to get established and then produce their blossom over a very short period of time in an attempt to catch up. Not only does this show the adaptability of Mother Nature, it has also resulted in some spectacular amounts of blossom. As the saintly Monty Don said on Gardener’s World last week, he has never seen so much blossom in his lifetime – and he is in his early 60s. Amazing – the blossom I mean, not his age!

Wisterias are looking as if they will swamp entire buildings and the scent is just amazing! Fruit trees burst into a great froth of blooms – and then seemed over in a flash. All sorts of wildflowers have been flowering together, resulting in some gorgeous colour mixes and amazing vistas. Bluebells, while prolific this year, have run into the emergence of the ferns. The new bright green ferns shooting up among them are diluting their magnificent purple/blue colour somewhat. Different – but no less stunning.

Not knowing much about it, I can only assume the effect on insects and wildlife will be equally ‘rearranged’ by this topsy-turvy weather. I’ve heard more cuckoos this year than I have before and there seem to be a great many swallows about… which I guess must mean more insects thanks to the masses of blossom! And so it goes around.

As long as mankind doesn’t interfere too much with its chemicals and denuding of the countryside, we can rely on Mother Nature to sort it all out for herself. If only other problems in the world could be managed in the same way

PS. Just had to add that I thought the flowers at the royal wedding were absolutely stunning! The entrance to St George’s Chapel was fantastic! What did you think?

 

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Egged on!

Whenever I am thinking about writing a blog, certain topics leap into my mind because they interest me (new craft ideas, gardens, cakes etc.) while others occur just because I’ve written about them before and found them so interesting I have to revisit them! Tea is one such topic, as are chickens and eggs.

Whenever I write about chickens or eggs, the blogs are always popular. Sadly, since she moved house, my partner in crime writing Julia no longer keeps hens, but I do love eggs and manage to buy lovely free range eggs locally. We eat more than 12 billion eggs a year in this country (amazing!), but when you look at how versatile eggs are, I suppose it’s not that surprising.

An egg is just such a wonderful thing – nature at her most clever it seems to me. The design of an egg is so perfect – their asymmetric tapered oval shape means that if you nudge them, they’ll come back to you. They’ll sweep out in a circle around the pointed end, and come to a stop with the pointed end facing uphill – pretty essential if you nest on a cliff edge! In fact, the eggs of birds that have their nests in precarious places are more oval than the eggs of birds that nest on the ground.

Another reason for eggs to be egg-shaped is that they fit together snugly in the nest, with only small air spaces between them so they help keep each other warm. And let’s not forget another reason that eggs are tapered – so that they can get pushed out of the hen more easily – ouch!

An egg contains every vitamin, except C, as well as calcium, magnesium, zinc and selenium, plus lots of other micronutrients. As you may know, all of the fat is in the yolk, but so is most of the goodness. Some terribly serious diet gurus want us to feast(!) on whipped egg white omelettes and, while I’m sure that’s terribly healthy… it’s also rather dull to my mind.

Eggs are so versatile, just think of all the things you can make with them… cakes (now why did that come into my mind first?!), omelettes, meringues and mayonnaise. They can be boiled and used in sandwiches, on picnics and for soldiers at breakfast. Great for glazing baked items and for thickening and lovely when scrambled and served with smoked salmon as a treat! And then, of course, the shells themselves – lovely to decorate, perfect for growing seedlings in and the best packaging ever for a ‘ready meal’!

However, the poor old egg has been through some crises in this country. There was the big salmonella scare in the late 1980s when everyone seemed terrified of eating them. Then we were told their cholesterol content is bad for your heart – it’s not. The egg is also often stated as a cause of constipation but that again, isn’t true, it’s just that they have absolutely no dietary fibre, so you shouldn’t fill up on eggs instead of high-fibre foods. How different from my childhood when I can remember those funny TV adverts with comedians Tony Hancock and Patricia Hayes telling us to ‘Go to work on an egg’ as they were supposed to be so good for you!

 

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Joanna Sheen Cardmaking Collection

I know many of you will have spotted this Cardmaking Collection back in January when it was released, but we have had so much positive feedback from it – I’m so glad everyone has enjoyed playing with the freebies and the papers – that I thought it would be good to just mention it again.

There are many nice bits and pieces that come with the set – a FANTASTIC embossing folder, that I have loved and used and used, a jug on a lace tablecloth that just goes so brilliantly with the flowers in the kit or any other flowers you choose. The daffodil die is of course very appropriate as the daffs are all struggling to come out now the snow has cleared (at least down here in Devon it has!) and there are so many different designs you could create with this die.

I have to say thank you to some of Practical Publishing’s team that made some of the cards in this picture, Nicky Gilburt, Jo Boland and Sue Hughes. There are many more card designers that worked on this issue and I wish I could mention them all – they are a very talented team.

Also included in this kit is the pretty stencil and of course fabulous rubber stamps and not forgetting the sheets and sheets of backing papers and toppers.

Currently, we have a few copies left so if you fancy one, grab it now before they disappear forever – they never republish an issue!

 

 

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The weather is looking a bit blenky out there…

I suspect we’ve all been a little obsessed with the weather over the past couple of weeks as we have swung from a mild February into a ferocious and freezing March… and then back to balmy spring days again – I know I have! I’ve been glued to the Met Office App and avidly following weather stories on the BBC website.

After witnessing a stunning weather phenomenon – a sort of universal ‘glazing’ – down here on Dartmoor last week, a post on Facebook drew my attention to ‘Ammill’, the official term for this rare event. As ever, this set me thinking and I started looking for other unusual or forgotten weather terms – and was delighted with what I discovered! I suspect that, years ago, the weather had so much more direct impact on our lives that we had many more terms to describe it. I am going to start a crusade to reintroduce some of these gems into regular use. So, the next time we are stuck with drizzle and strong wind, be sure to tell everyone it is hunch-weather!! Enjoy…

BLENKY

To blenky means ‘to snow very lightly.’ It’s probably derived from blenks, an earlier 18th-century word for ashes or cinders.

A perfect Drouth day.

DROUTH

This is an old Irish-English word for the perfect weather conditions in which to dry clothes.

FLENCHES

If the weather flenches, then it looks like it might improve later on, but never actually does… we have a lot of that in Devon!

FOXY

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, if the weather is foxy then it is misleadingly bright’ — or, in other words, sunny, but freezing cold.

Hunch weather.

HUNCH WEATHER

An old 18th-century name for weather — like drizzle or strong wind —that’s bad enough to make people hunch over when they walk.

HENTING

A Cornish word for raining hard, as in “ee’s henting out there!”

BENGY

Pronounced ‘Benji,’ this is an old southeast English dialect word meaning ‘overcast’ or ‘threatening rain.’

MESSENGER

A messenger?

A single sunbeam that breaks through a thick cloud can also be called a messenger, rather lovely, I thought.

SWULLOCKING

An old southeast English word meaning ‘sultry’ or ‘humid.’ If the sky looks swullocking, then it looks like there’s a thunderstorm on the way.

HEN-SCARTINS

This is an old English word for long, thin streaks of cloud traditionally supposed to forecast a rain. It literally means

Now that’s what I call a Twirlblast!

‘chicken scratches.’

TWIRLBLAST AND TWIRLWIND

Two lovely old 18th-century names for tornados – much more fun!

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Dreaming of Thomas Kinkade summer cottages in the snow!

I am sitting warm and cosy, at my desk in deepest Devon, while outside there are quite a few inches of snow! It’s very unusual for us to have snow at all never mind this deep as we’re not far from the sea, which seems to keep things warmer. But not this winter… although is March still classed as winter?

So I thought a warm comforting selection of pictures would do us all good! Here you can see Thomas Kinkade at his best. Gorgeous summery cottages, flowers and peaceful fields and a pony or three that looks very content. Not so my daughter’s horse at the moment, I digress I know, but poor Bobby the grey horse is a very grumpy chap this morning. He has four blanket things on (can you tell I’m not horsey?) and has been given a warm breakfast and is still giving any human nearby the evil eye, assuming I guess that it could be any one of us that has caused the drop in temperature! Last night when tucking him into bed (believe me if they did 4 poster beds for horses she would buy him one) the temperature outside the stable was -6 degrees C …. I wouldn’t like to be out in that it has to be said, I have an electric blanket …. Result!

Anyway back to Thomas. These pictures are from our latest Thomas Kinkade pads, volume 5 and volume 6 and they are some of the best yet. I have tweaked the design slightly so you get co-ordinating backing papers contained within the pad and that seems to have hit a chord with many of you. For example that lovely red brick gate post has a matching red brick wallpaper in the pad, then there are frames and sentiments as well as the usual decoupage and borders. Lovely pads and very, very popular everywhere in the world that we sell to.

So all these three cards have main images and backing papers from the pads, have a look at our website and see if you fancy making a happy summery card today!

PS Apologies to those of you reading in other countries that are either hot and sunny currently, or like my friend Cheryl in Michigan, totally unimpressed by a measly inch or six of snow!

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