Thomas Kinkade’s beautiful skies

I chose to group these cards together to show off Thomas Kinkade’s talent when he painted skies. The light and the effects are just stunning, aren’t they?

He produced several pictures of boats and maritime-themed images but the central windmill scene is one of my favourite skies in the latest collection we have produced. These are from the Thomas Kinkade Pad 5 and Pad 6.

Judging by the hugely enthusiastic response we have had to the latest couple of Thomas Kinkade pads, the concept of mixing backing papers and images in the same pad is going to be a good ongoing idea.

You can see three of the papers included in the pads here – the stripes to the left and a couple of lovely cloudy skies. I do find it convenient having reached for the pad, almost everything I need is there at my fingertips! I am talking to the powers that be at Thomas Kinkade’s management team and hopefully we will have four new pads coming out in the next six months, including some very pretty Christmas ones.


The chandelier – a touch of glamour in the gloom…

Goodness – I am glad to see the back of January – what a wet and miserable month it has been. February is our shortest month… so before we know it we’ll be in March and spring will be well underway! In an attempt to avoid the gloomy weather, I’ve been distracting myself with some very fanciful ‘window shopping’ although these days, it’s more a case of ‘screen shopping’ as I sit in front of my laptop. I have been cheering myself up rummaging around websites full of lovely bits and pieces for the home. Do I need anything new? Of course not, but it’s fun to look and it’s free!

A snazzy pink number from Next.

One of the areas that seems to have undergone a massive change in the last couple of years is lighting, both indoor and out. Solar powered fairy lights are brilliant and mean we can all light up our gardens without any need for an electrician or any DIY skills at all and they are quite cheap to buy too and cost nothing to run… although it’s true they do need sunshine to charge! For interiors, there are some absolutely stunning lights around and metallic effects seem to be very ‘in’ at the moment and there are some lovely copper lampshades and light fittings to be had. Copper is lovely and warm and would give a soft light for winter.

A dramatic smokey style from B&Q!

But if you want to really ‘go for it’… what about a chandelier? Years ago, a chandelier was the height of opulence and only really wealthy people with large, high ceilinged rooms could have them. But not any more! There are some terrific ones available now from as little as £20 and they come in all shapes, sizes and colours. Dunelm, B&Q and Next (to name but a few) have an amazing range and most of them just fit onto your light fitting like a normal lampshade. Their twinkling light cannot help but cheer up the dreariest winter day.

Originally, chandeliers were made from expensive materials such as rock crystal and bronze so they were well beyond the means of anyone except royalty. The name ‘chandelier’ comes from the French ‘chandelle’, which means candleholder. It was that modest monarch, Louis XIV of France, who really bought into the chandelier when he filled the Hall of Mirrors in Versailles with them. It must have been the most breath-taking sight in an age (1600s) long before electric light, and when the soft glow of a few candles in a candelabra was normally all you could have of an evening. Louis’ massive crystal chandeliers were themselves lit by candles, but their light was reflected both by the thousands of crystals and the mirrors on the walls so it must have been an absolutely dazzling spectacle – can you imagine!

What an amazing spectacle the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles must have been, lit by hundreds of candles, their light reflected thousands of times.

Murano glass tends to be a very ‘Marmite’ design, either loved or loathed!

During the 18th century, glassblowers developed more elaborate creations with bevels and facets. Then the Venetian glassblowers of Murano got their hands on the chandelier and transformed it, yet again, into a sprouting profusion of flower-festooned stems and leaves. You can still buy this style of chandelier made in Murano, but they will set you back a bit!

After candles came gaslights and then electricity and the chandelier has continued to evolve. The development of plastics and Perspex in any shape and colour today gives us inexpensive chandeliers that are lightweight and just plain fun. And why not? I’d quite like a natty little aqua blue one to hang in the bathroom… but I’m waiting for just the moment to suggest this to Richard!







A really ‘wow’ tulip card!

This gorgeous tulip design is one of those ‘wow’ cards that looks amazing but is really quick and easy. It’s a great card for scoring brownie points from someone who isn’t a huge fan of handmade cards!

You will need the Butterfly Cloud die and die cut it 8 times in white card. Organise some pale blue card matted on a petrol or darker blue and then mat the topper from the Jane Shasky Garden Delights pad on the same darker blue.

Attach the blue backing to the 8” x 8” card blank and then stick the butterfly die cuts down onto the pale blue. If you twist and tweak them you can line up three down each side and fill in the gap top and bottom with diecut seven and eight. Obviously the middle can stay plain as you will be covering it.

Attach the topper to the card using foam tape to help it stick over the die covered backing card. Then snip out the extra decoupage pieces on the sheet from the pad and add those using glue gel. Finally add the sentiment top right, or wherever you choose.

It’s fun to make, simple and very impressive!


Cosmos and hanging baskets

If you read the title and thought “You can’t put cosmos in a hanging basket” you would probably be correct!

There may be some mini ones I am not aware of but the glorious softly waving flowers at the back of my border would definitely not fit in a basket! No, the title refers to the mix on this card where I have embellished one of Jane Shasky’s amazing images with a die cut basket full of flowers.

The Signature dies I used for this were Hanging Basket and Flowers for Containers. The flower die was specially designed so you can fill the basket to size and choose how you colour them.

You could focus on bright reds as if it were a basket of geraniums, or if the card needs something soft and dgentle – how about cream, white and pale yellow? The joy of diecutting in white is playing with your markers to get something completely unique for your project.

The butterfly in the top right corner is snipped away from the diecut of Butterfly Cloud. The other butterflies all come on the sheet from the pad.

It’s a simple card but a fun change of colour combination for me, I did enjoy playing with this design.


Rainy birthday!

Rainy birthday? Oh dear… It would be nice if there was a rule of Nature that it never rained on your birthday… nope not happening. If it didn’t rain on anybody’s birthday, we’d live in a desert Joanna, be sensible! But it does always seem sad when you wake (as I did this year) on your birthday to hear rain pelting against the glass of your bedroom windows!

However, with luck the younger generations think rain is fun and like dancing in puddles and this is reflected in this lovely birthday card.

The teddies are from a great pack of decoupage that has a lot of occasions covered. The John Bindon set of decoupage has so many different occasions that it could help with card ideas. It’s temporarily on offer on the website at the moment, so that’s a fair bit of inspiration for £4.99 as well as £5 saving. See I knew we saved money by being cardmakers!

The backing paper is from Volume 1 of my collection of backing papers and the umbrella die is (SD157) from the Signature dies range, unsurprisingly called Umbrella! It’s a quick and easy card to make and hopefully your recipient won’t need an umbrella on their birthday!