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Thomas Kinkade for a relaxing cardmaking session

I enjoy crafting and cardmaking most of the time, even the most complex designs, but just occasionally I think how nice it would be to have a pretty card made without too much effort or angst going into it – just a relaxed few minutes at your craft spot, whether it be the kitchen table or a desk.

This Thomas Kinkade project is so simple, hopefully you should find it a great way to chill and craft! The ingredients are all fairly simple and, of course, you can tweak which main design you use, and change the backing paper to use something you may have in your stash.

I think crafting can be compared to cooking – sometimes I want to make my own stock and sauces from scratch – and at other times I just want to get on, and an Oxo cube will do nicely thank you! I hope you enjoy this one.

Ingredients:

Method:

  1. Mat some of the backing paper on grey card – add that to the card blank. I use double sided tape, but use whatever you like to use.
  2. Cut the border from the sheet in the Thomas Kinkade pad, add two-thirds or so of the way down (as in photo).
  3. Die cut the Sabrina border and make sure it is the same width as the grey card. Stick on with whatever glue you enjoy using – I use either glossy accents or a quickie glue pen.
  4. Mat the main image onto white card and attach that to your design and then cut out the little sentiment also on the sheet and add that – hey presto …. done!

 

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Fabulous Faberge egg Easter cards

Lots of people are thinking about Easter cards at the moment – I can always tell as sales of chicks, rabbits and now our Faberge eggs are really strong! We decided to have some Faberge eggs in the range as I thought they would make a much more flexible die than just plain Easter eggs. That’s the only trouble with seasonal designs, they can be a bit limiting – you are not likely to use a Santa in August or a Happy Father’s Day in October!

Faberge eggs are a true symbol of wealth, indulgence and fabulous decoration. I have had a play with decorating real eggs and it’s a wonderful skill – I wasn’t too adept, but my teacher was just amazing and I still have the egg she gave me. Faberge eggs were created from 1885 through to 1916 when the Imperial Russian family were removed by the revolution. The detailing on the eggs and the contents were just breathtaking.

Now I am not saying we mere cardmakers can produce anything quite so fabulous but you can have a lot of fun playing with gold, flat backed crystals and pearls and family pictures peeping out of the little opening door! So maybe you could create a beautiful anniversary card with a Faberge egg on a stand – or just enjoy creating! I have to admit that sometimes I just make cards because I can, it’s so therapeutic and relaxing.

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As the wedding season approaches…

I always think of engagements and wedding announcements as Spring approaches. I’m not quite sure why as I expect people get married all year round – my own was in December – but somehow blossom and weddings… well here is the first of many wedding cards I will need this year no doubt.

The Signature die range has quite a few wedding ideas and this cake is one of them – although of course, you could also use it as a birthday, christening, golden wedding or any celebration cake. I have used just the base very successfully as a Christmas cake design with embellishments of holly etc.

The words are from foil printed sets that are easily available, I have a drawer full of oddments from many years ago that often come in handy, though of course, wedding related words are also available as dies from All Occasion or Britannia dies.

So the components on this card are the Signature dies wedding cake (SD405), the Signature dies wedding horseshoe (SD038) and very importantly the Signature Sabrina Lace Border (SD407) – this is a very useful decorative border that I have used masses of times, it always looks lovely.

Colour wise, nothing beats white and silver – or you could use white and gold if it was for a golden wedding celebration of course. The other option is to know the bride’s colour scheme and bring that into the card. Hooray for weddings I say – I love them!

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Hello Paris!

This is very apt, I feel, for Tina Dorr, our newsletter editor and long time member of the team. Tina has bravely (in my opinion, but then I am a bit wimpy!) bought a lovely home in France and is just starting her journey to moving over and transferring her life.

I think the good luck on the card may be needed. My brother lived and worked in France for many years and often bumped into their red tape, but it was all worth it, he felt, as the local people were lovely and the food and wine… well goes without saying!

So here’s hoping it will be a fabulous retirement home for you Tina and Aidan – life is about following your dreams and I know France is where you have wanted to be for very many years – here you go!

The card uses an image from our Helena Lam 6 x 6” cardmaking pad. If you haven’t tried any of the pads, do give one a go as they are so handy for getting a really lovely card together. The backing paper could be used from one of the Graphic 45 Cityscapes pads or ephemera – or any other Eiffel Tower images or postcards that you have.

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Tree-mendous!

Trees are such a familiar part of our countryside that I think we often take them for granted. Not only are trees ‘the lungs’ of our world they are also incredibly beautiful, varied and inspiring. People write poetry about them, paint them and hug them.

I am lucky in that I live quite a rural life and Devon has a reasonable amount of woodland. However, I was somewhat surprised to read that the UK has one of the lowest tree cover rates in Europe, just 13% compared to a European average of 37%.

The Woodland Trust has launched an ambitious plan to plant 64 million trees by 2025 and they want us all to help. They are offering a free pack of seeds containing rowan, dog rose, alder, buckthorn and holly, and it comes with full planting instructions and care advice. What a great idea! They will also offer help and advice as your seedlings germinate and grow.

The seeds they send you will be kept moist with compost to help them germinate. This means it will be harder to tell the different seeds apart when they arrive. If you would like to try and identify the seeds you’re planting you can wash the compost off but then the seeds must be sown immediately. It will be much easier to identify your seedling once it has germinated. To claim your free seed pack click on the link here.

I think this is an absolutely brilliant scheme and the more of us that get involved the better. I will be claiming my pack today.

If you are lucky enough to already have trees in your garden, have you ever considered collecting seeds from them, propagating the seedlings and then either planting more yourself or perhaps giving them away as gifts?

The top four methods for seed collection used on the UK National Tree Seed Project (UKNTSP) are easily remembered through the handy acronym SEED:

Shake tree over a large laid out tarpaulin

Extra-long pole to prune off seeds clusters

Encase branch ends in a cotton fine-meshed bag to collect small wind-dispersed seed

Delicately hand-pick fleshy berries

When collecting seeds it’s best not to collect from the ground, to avoid collecting old seeds from previous years. Never take more than 20% of the seed crop, remember seeds create the next generation of plants and sustain wildlife. There are lots of good reasons to collect seeds and you can read all about it here.

So, the next time you’re out collecting seeds or growing them in your garden, just think of the extraordinary journey their counterparts are on. Heading towards the ultimate goal of ensuring your great-great grandchildren can have the same experience you’re having. The simple yet irreplaceable delights of planting and watching your own seed grow from a tiny speck into a monumental tree.

The Woodland Trust is well worth supporting, and its website is full of interesting facts. Do have a look if you have a moment…

All photos copyright Julia Wherrell. Top illustration – The Woodland Trust.

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