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Tree-mendous!

Trees are such a familiar part of our countryside that I think we often take them for granted. Not only are trees ‘the lungs’ of our world they are also incredibly beautiful, varied and inspiring. People write poetry about them, paint them and hug them.

I am lucky in that I live quite a rural life and Devon has a reasonable amount of woodland. However, I was somewhat surprised to read that the UK has one of the lowest tree cover rates in Europe, just 13% compared to a European average of 37%.

The Woodland Trust has launched an ambitious plan to plant 64 million trees by 2025 and they want us all to help. They are offering a free pack of seeds containing rowan, dog rose, alder, buckthorn and holly, and it comes with full planting instructions and care advice. What a great idea! They will also offer help and advice as your seedlings germinate and grow.

The seeds they send you will be kept moist with compost to help them germinate. This means it will be harder to tell the different seeds apart when they arrive. If you would like to try and identify the seeds you’re planting you can wash the compost off but then the seeds must be sown immediately. It will be much easier to identify your seedling once it has germinated. To claim your free seed pack click on the link here.

I think this is an absolutely brilliant scheme and the more of us that get involved the better. I will be claiming my pack today.

If you are lucky enough to already have trees in your garden, have you ever considered collecting seeds from them, propagating the seedlings and then either planting more yourself or perhaps giving them away as gifts?

The top four methods for seed collection used on the UK National Tree Seed Project (UKNTSP) are easily remembered through the handy acronym SEED:

Shake tree over a large laid out tarpaulin

Extra-long pole to prune off seeds clusters

Encase branch ends in a cotton fine-meshed bag to collect small wind-dispersed seed

Delicately hand-pick fleshy berries

When collecting seeds it’s best not to collect from the ground, to avoid collecting old seeds from previous years. Never take more than 20% of the seed crop, remember seeds create the next generation of plants and sustain wildlife. There are lots of good reasons to collect seeds and you can read all about it here.

So, the next time you’re out collecting seeds or growing them in your garden, just think of the extraordinary journey their counterparts are on. Heading towards the ultimate goal of ensuring your great-great grandchildren can have the same experience you’re having. The simple yet irreplaceable delights of planting and watching your own seed grow from a tiny speck into a monumental tree.

The Woodland Trust is well worth supporting, and its website is full of interesting facts. Do have a look if you have a moment…

All photos copyright Julia Wherrell. Top illustration – The Woodland Trust.

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New Year’s resolutions and reflections…

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Ahhh! My partner in crime writing Julia was a big Sir Terry fan and met him a couple of times. She confirms he was a lovely, lovely man.

Well, “Goodbye 2016″! I can’t, in all honesty, say I will miss you one bit – and I am excitedly looking forward to what I hope will be a fabulous 2017 for us all.

There seem to have been so many sad deaths of people that brightened our lives with brilliant entertainment – like Terry Wogan (I love that the BBC have named their building Wogan House). Victoria Wood was another entertainer I loved to bits, great lady. The list is horribly long this year with people such as Alan Rickman, Greg Lake, Prince, Ronnie Corbett, Gene Wilder, Andrew Sachs – oh the list is too long to quote. May they all rest in peace.

We have had dramatic political happenings this year (let’s not dwell on those), war and fighting continue in so many areas of the world I can only pray for more peace next year. In my personal world, which I realise does not impact the main population, I lost both my beloved parents only hours apart at the beginning of the year, and then decided I would pop up again on Create and Craft.

Back on Create & Craft!

Back on Create & Craft!

Life goes on and life is for living and the main wisdom that I have ringing in my ears (thank you, Mother) is the advice to live every day to the maximum. Love those around you and tell them so, help the community around you and be the best person that you can.

That’s as close to New Year resolutions that I am going to get for 2017 … oh ok, that old chestnut, I am going to reach my target weight at Slimming World in 2017, but my guess is it will be nearer the end of the year than the beginning, but I will get there!

I wish you all happiness and health, family and friendship and let’s hope the world decides to take a

turn for the better this year!

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A Christmas cracker!

You can’t have Christmas dinner without Christmas crackers – well, that’s my view anyway! We groan at the awfulness of the mottos, we laugh at the pointlessness of the ‘gift’ and we feel silly wearing the paper hats… but it is a tradition and we stick to it every year.

In moments of great industriousness, I have made my own crackers and spent ages thinking of appropriate gifts and jokes to go inside. They always go down well, but they take a lot of planning.

This will be my first Christmas without my parents, Diana and John, so this year will be tinged with sadness for all the family. But Mummy’s enthusiasm for a traditional family Christmas is firmly entrenched with all of us and I shall be filling stockings, dressing the table and fussing about the sprouts just as always.

I love decorating the table, I think it makes such an impact with pretty napkins, candles and, of course, a special Christmas table centrepiece. I have produced so many over the years and always find myself getting excited as I add the finishing touches. If you don’t have a large table, you can still make it look lovely with a table runner ­– cheap enough to buy even in supermarkets these days – or run up one of your own very simply. Table sprinkles are also great fun and really do add a touch of glitz and sparkle… but you’ll be hoovering them up for weeks afterwards!

Returning to the Christmas cracker… did you know they were invented in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Thomas Smith? Rather unromantically, he devised the Christmas cracker as a money-making idea when bonbon sales slumped. They originally contained love messages and a sweet. The enterprising Mr Smith then went on to the snapping strip to replicate the sound of a crackling log fire!

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Vintage Containers

CoffeeBeanSome call it clutter, hoarding or just plain rubbish. However, I love my collection of ‘useful’ pots. I save and buy quite randomly – I might see a basket in a charity shop, or a vase in a local gift shop or florist. But my squirreled away treasures also include things like Camembert boxes (come on, you can cover them or just use them as a ‘useful pot’) and, when I have seedlings in mind, even the yogurt pots are not immune to being well washed and stored away in a cupboard.

As a crafter I have worrying tendencies to clutter my life with things that will ‘come in useful’. But they bring me a lot of pleasure and when you find a brilliant use for something you had hidden away, it can feel really rewarding. If I have to defend myself I will play the eco card and talk loudly about recycling but …. the truth is I was obviously a hamster in a previous life and just like storing all sorts of goodies!

On the desk that I use for crafting I have several recycled items used for storage. I adore Jo Malone perfume and was given a set of their smellies for Christmas and the box – well, I was almost as thrilled with that as with the perfume! So that has all my ‘too small not to get lost’ in a drawer oddments. Then I have an old enamel pot that my Mum decorated with barge art when we were both going through ‘a phase’! That sorts my scissors and Japanese screw punches. I also have a pretty little handmade box that a crafter called Alice gave me one NEC that I treasure and also use for my stash of cocktail sticks.

So I understand only too well when my little toddler granddaughter holds tightly onto the box of an expensive toy and disappears off to play with that leaving whatever the present was languishing on the floor! Maybe my children can blame that on her Granny as an inherited trait!

This image caught my eye as I love the collection of vintage bits and pieces filled with flowers, I may even try and recreate something like it one day – if I do I’ll post it here on the blog!

Lily of the Valley card

Ingredients

Method

  1. Start by trimming some of the paler hessian backing paper to 7 ¾”, then the darker coffee sack paper to 7 ½”. Layer these onto the card with double sided tape.
  2. Cut out the main image from the cardmaking sheet. Also cut the decoupage pieces.
  3. Attach the image to the card using tape and then build the decoupage with Pinflair glue gel.
  4. Make the embellishment of lilies of the valley by cutting the die multiple times in soft green, cream and white. Finish the bunch with a bow tied in bakers twine.
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Children’s books – expanding imagination!

As an every-so-slightly doting grannie, I was very interested to read a recent BBC radio poll about which books most adults say every child should read. At the moment I read my granddaughter Grace Winnie the Pooh (the original, not the Disney version) and a lot of Spot the Dog books and ‘noisy’ books that have buttons to press that make different noises! She is not yet three, but I am already planning her future reading, so was interested to see what the top picks were in the poll…

… and it’s no surprise really that the poll suggested 26% of British adults think Harry Potter is the book they think every child should read, closely followed by Roald Dahl’s The BFG.

Top10BooksThe top ten list looks like this:

  • Harry Potter
  • The BFG
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
  • The Famous Five
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar
  • The Wind in the Willows
  • The Gruffalo
  • The Lord of the Rings
  • The Bible

When people were asked why they chose any particular book, the most common answer was because it ‘expands imagination’, followed by the desire to pass on the pleasure they themselves got from reading it. Couldn’t agree more! Books are so wonderful to lose yourself in, whatever your age.

The top choices of books varied across the generations with Harry Potter (35%) and ‘The BFG’ (31%) the runaway favourites among 18-34-year-olds.

However, ‘The Famous Five’ (26%) and ‘The Wind and the Willows’ (25%) are the most common recommendations for those aged 55 plus – ahem, I think that’s me then! I adored ‘The Famous Five’ series and owned every one, and ‘The Wind and the Willows’ had me enchanted, and I still love it today.

To Kill a Mockingbird was chosen because it provides lessons about the world and because it helps to develop good moral character. It wasn’t a book I particularly enjoyed… but each to their own!

The poll showed that for the most part, choices are evenly split between the genders – however, The Famous Five is a more popular recommendation among women (22%) than men (15%), while The Lord of the Rings is more likely to be recommended by men (20%) than women (9%).

I was also thrilled to see that Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was listed. I wrote a blog about it in 2015 when it was the 150th anniversary of its publication and, since it was first published, it has never been out of print. It is the most fascinating story, simple and also complex, however you want to read it and a book that most certainly expands imagination.

What were your favourite childhood reads? And what did you read to your children or grandchildren? I’d love to hear!

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