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Pearls of wisdom

Surely one of the most popular embellishments for card makers – pearls manage to be pretty and elegant without being overly showy, classy rather than brash I always think! Of course, the pearls we use are synthetic, but a real natural pearl is a thing of extraordinary beauty.

If you have been to see Mama Mia II (like me!!), you will know there’s a scene where a young suitor opens an oyster for his beloved (no names, no plot spoilers!) and there just happens to be a great big pearl nestling in it! In reality, finding a pearl in an oyster is very rare… but in fiction, of course, anything can happen!

So what is a natural pearl? I always think it is incredible how they are produced… Pearls are made when a small object, such as a grain of sand, is washed into a mollusc. As a defence mechanism to an irritant inside its shell, the mollusc creates a substance called nacre (mother of pearl). Layer upon layer of nacre, coat the grain of sand until the iridescent gem is formed. The ideal pearl is perfectly round and smooth, but many other shapes, known as ‘baroque’ pearls, can occur. The finest quality natural pearls have been highly valued as gemstones and objects of beauty for many centuries. Because of this, ‘pearl’ has become a metaphor for something rare, fine, and valuable.

The most valuable pearls occur spontaneously in the wild, but are extremely rare, which is why they command such high prices. These wild pearls are referred to as ‘natural’ pearls. Cultured or farmed pearls from pearl oysters and freshwater mussels make up the vast majority of those sold. Imitation pearls are also widely sold in inexpensive jewellery – I think most of us of a ‘certain age’ probably own a string, but their iridescence is poor compared to genuine pearls.

Pearls are cultivated primarily for use in jewellery, but, in the past were also used to adorn clothing – think of the Elizabethans and their bodices encrusted with pearls. They are also been crushed and used in cosmetics, medicines and paint formulations.

Whether wild or cultured, gem-quality pearls are almost always pearlescent and iridescent, like the interior of the shell that produces them… hence the rather lovely term ‘mother of pearl’ as found inside the mollusc’s shell.

Cultured pearls are formed in pearl farms, using human intervention as well as natural processes. As with natural pearls, the initial formation of cultured pearls is the response of the shell to an ‘irritant’ – a tissue implant. A tiny piece of tissue (from a donor shell is transplanted into a recipient shell, causing a pearl sac to form into which the pearls structure starts to form. There are a number of methods for producing cultured pearls and one is by adding a spherical bead as a nucleus and most saltwater
cultured pearls are grown in this way.

So what makes pearls so beautiful? The unique lustre of pearls depends upon the reflection, refraction, and diffraction of light from the pearl’s translucent layers – the thinner and more numerous the layers in the pearl, the finer the lustre. So it’s the overlapping of successive layers causes the iridescence that pearls display. So now you know!

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Thomas Kinkade’s beautiful skies

I chose to group these cards together to show off Thomas Kinkade’s talent when he painted skies. The light and the effects are just stunning, aren’t they?

He produced several pictures of boats and maritime-themed images but the central windmill scene is one of my favourite skies in the latest collection we have produced. These are from the Thomas Kinkade Pad 5 and Pad 6.

Judging by the hugely enthusiastic response we have had to the latest couple of Thomas Kinkade pads, the concept of mixing backing papers and images in the same pad is going to be a good ongoing idea.

You can see three of the papers included in the pads here – the stripes to the left and a couple of lovely cloudy skies. I do find it convenient having reached for the pad, almost everything I need is there at my fingertips! I am talking to the powers that be at Thomas Kinkade’s management team and hopefully we will have four new pads coming out in the next six months, including some very pretty Christmas ones.

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Happy Summer memories!

I do hope you’ve had a lovely Christmas. Now, as we race towards the end of this year I thought I’d take a moment to think back to the Summer. Just now, the sun seems a long way away for us Europeans – but you can always cheer yourself up by playing with sunny images.

I had a particularly lovely holiday in 2017 – possibly one of my best ever and so I have memories galore to enjoy from that. We have just had our favourite holiday picture printed out onto canvas for my writing room wall. So I can look up and see sunny weather and a gorgeous shot of us sailing away from Venice, cheers me up every time I see it!

We saw lots of Greek islands too later in the cruise and more olive trees than you can imagine. I have a stock of perfect olive oil, loads of super smelling olive oil based soaps and Greek honey still in the cupboards to remind me of a happy time.

So this image from the Lisa Audit Pad 2 cardmaking collection is super appropriate. Because it’s part of a pad, it’s really simple to incorporate into a pretty card. It is paired with the Signature die SD567 – the Fishing Net Corner which adds the perfect embellishment.

It may be cold and wintery outside but in my craft room it’s still summer!

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Patchwork Fish!

This is a fun shaker card that has bubbles or snow inside the fishbowl! Shaker cards are simple to make once you have made your first one (I always found them really intimidating) and the swish of the ‘bubbles’ adds another dimension to the card.

The background patchwork paper is from the Joanna Sheen Paper Collections Pad (Volume 3) – there’s a blue version of this pink patchwork too – so pretty. The size of the card is 8” x 8”  – yes I use this card size a lot and love our own brand cards that size as they really are 8” x 8”, whereas most manufactured cards measure the envelope or have slight tolerances with size etc..

The shaker part is created like this:

  1. Take a piece of white card about 4” square and put to one side for now. Cut a piece slightly larger say 4 ¼” square. Stamp or die cut a fish bowl (Sue Wilson does one on the website CED21001) on the larger piece and attach to the centre of the card. Now cut away the centre of the fish bowl. Cover the back of the fish bowl with some acetate.
  2. Die cut some tropical fish (Signature dies Tropical Fish) in white card and colour as you please. Glue these onto the smaller piece of card, checking that you are happy with their placement by hovering the fishbowl over the top.
  3. Place a strip of foam tape all the way around the smaller piece of card – and I mean all the way around. Cracks between the corners can spell disaster. One way to combat this is to place a strip all round and then cover that strip with yet another but staggering where the cracks are.
  4. Now you need to cover the fish and sticky layers with your fishbowl square – do this carefully and leave a small gap once you have most of it covered – pour in your glitter or snow effect crystals or seed beads, whatever you want to use. Don’t add too much or you will just obscure the fish. Now seal down the last bit of tape.
  5. This can then be added to the card and should shake very satisfactorily!
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More seaside memories

As the last blog featured lost ice creams, I thought we should continue the theme of seaside memories but instead of cards, here are a couple of 3D projects that you can make using the Signature dies.

There are lots of inexpensive frames you can buy that are deep 3D designs. This beach scene would look lovely in a child’s bedroom or perhaps just the thing for a bathroom. Just like making a card, you build up the picture and I use Pinflair glue gel for attaching the die cuts as you can add height with larger blobs of glue. We have quite a few beach related designs in our section ‘On the Beach’, so you could chop and change the ingredients to suit you. Perhaps a set of three pictures featuring different beachy scenes would look nice?

Likewise, this wooden plaque makes a pretty ornament. How about hanging it from the door knob or drawer front? It’s an MDF base with the string stapled to the back. You can then add whatever ingredients you fancy. I love the ice cream image, so many happy memories!

Before I redecorated, I had a completely beach-inspired theme for one of my bathrooms. Red and white life belts as towel rings (ok they were bought not made!), a lighthouse lamp in one corner and baskets of beautiful shells! I have collected pretty shells for years and have oodles of them. My towels were striped red and white and blue and white, and the bath mat was cork so looked vaguely beachy! Now I have a much more traditional lavender and roses theme – rather predictable, but I love the big arrangement I created using dried roses and bunches of lavender for the windowsill and pretty towels embroidered with lavender.

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