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Crunchy Chocolate and Peanut cupcakes

Here’s a delicious recipe for crunchy chocolate and peanut cupcakes. Our wonderful baking bookkeeper, Jo B, produced these cracking cupcakes for our member of staff Maggie, who was celebrating her birthday!

Makes 12

For the cakes:

  • 125g butter
  • 125g caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 eggs, large
  • 125g of self-raising flour, sifted
  • 2 tbsp milk
  • 75g milk chocolate chips

For the frosting:

  • 100g butter, softened
  • 160g smooth peanut butter (nice with almond butter too)
  • 60g icing sugar, sifted
  • 21/2 tbsp milk
  1. Preheat the oven to 170˚C/150˚C fan /gas mark 3 and line a 12 hole muffin tin with paper cases. For the cakes, cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the vanilla and eggs then beat well until thoroughly combined. Add the flour and milk and mix until smooth and fully incorporated.
  2. Fold the chocolate chips into the cake mixture then divide equally between the paper cases. Bake for 18-20 mins or until firm to the touch and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Remove from the tins and place on a wire rack to cool.
  3. For the frosting, beat the butter and peanut butter together until smooth and fluffy. Add the icing sugar and milk and beat together slowly until combined then beat a little faster until soft
  4. Now make the honeycomb which, by the way, could be used in ice cream or just gobbled by grandchildren!
  5. 200g caster sugar, 4 tablespoons golden syrup, 3 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda and chocolate to melt (optional)
  6. Put sugar and syrup into a pan and bring to the boil. Then gently simmer for 6 minutes. Add the bicarb and mix around quickly because it will immediately begin to fizz.
  7. Pour into a greased tray (the butter wrapper works well if you have one) and leave for 5 minutes, then gently begin prising from the tin. Leave for another 5 minutes and completely remove from tin. Break into pieces and keep in an airtight container.
  8. To clean the pan, add water and bring to the boil and just use the spoon to scrape.
  9. You can then half dip pieces of the honeycomb in chocolate if you wish – indeed I suspect serving just the honeycomb dipped in chocolate could get great granny points for me!

 

 

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Homemade bread

I have been making my own soup for years and we have long been thinking we might try making homemade bread to go with the soup – instant homemade lunches!

However this good idea was shelved along with so many others we have, as we got busier and busier. Then whilst at my sister’s house last week we got up one morning to the most amazing smell of bread .. I wondered if she had one of those part-baked loaves in the oven or some frozen croissants, but this really was a very strong scent… enough to raise Richard into an enthusiastic early breakfast!

Kate (my sister) assured us it was real home made bread, courtesy of her bread making machine and it was sitting waiting for us to road test the latest loaf. Cutting a long and delicious story short, it was wonderful and Richard especially, was madly keen as he loves bread and cheese or bread and soup even more than I do.

So courtesy of Amazon we pressed a button and this machine arrived a day or so later. Richard has now taken full control and it is obviously going to be a man thing, a bit like the BBQ. However you will hear no complaints from me – it’s lovely to share the cooking.

We have tried three different recipes this week: a French bread (delicious but a different shape to usual French bread obviously!), a standard white and a 50/50% wholemeal and white and I can honestly say that every crumb has been consumed and little Grace, our granddaughter, gave an enthusiastic thumbs up to the ‘Grandpa’ bread she ate for lunch today.

We chose the Panasonic SD-2511 as that’s what my sister had – seemed easier than choosing a different one and it not being as good. Then all you really need to keep in the cupboard is strong flour, water, salt, dried yeast and a touch of butter. There are plenty of other things you can add but the basics have worked well so far.

I have bought several books on machine bread making and I think we will be trying loaves with delicious little extras like olives or pecan nuts and maple syrup soon. But for now, I think it is unlikely we will bother to buy much regular bread from the supermarket as we just love having it all set on a timer and having that smell of baking bread first thing in the morning.

 

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Lisa Audit artwork

happyanniversaryroseIf you haven’t had a look at our Lisa Audit Cardmaking pads yet… you should! Her work is so pretty, contemporary and useful for, oh, so many cards. They are lovely.

The nice thing about our paper pads is that everything you need to get you started on a card is there and then you can add embellishments or backing papers as you desire.

With this card, several Signatures dies have been used – our rose tea set and our Harriet Lace Edger down the right-hand side.

To complement the teapot there’s a fun little tea bag and string bow, and the bunting in the top right is one of our Signature shapes.

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French China and hydrangeas…

CulinaryBirthdayI have said before that Hydrangeas are one of my favourites and here’s another example of how pretty they look. Fresh hydrangea popped in a teacup with another flower or two – lovely!

I follow various vintage–inspired interior design companies on Facebook and I get so much pleasure from little cameos of flowers in old china, or just old china on its own! I keep promising myself that I will redo my kitchen cupboards and arrange vintage china beautifully on every shelf… hmm maybe not, I might be too busy, nice thought, though.

It may be wonderful and contemporary to get all your household contents from IKEA, or somewhere equally minimalist but, for me, it will never have the appeal of collecting oddments from older members of the family and arranging them on shelves and window sills. I have about twenty little jugs of various sizes and I love the way they look as a collection. If I had more space I would love to collect teapots or teacups and saucers. I saw a collection the other day beautifully displayed – vintage Tupperware – hmm mine just looks beaten up and not attractive at all and is bunged in the cupboard over the freezer!

But the romantic in me inspired me to choose this artist – Stefania Ferri – she has some wonderful vintage–inspired looks which we have translated into card ingredients in the pad – I love it! Here’s how to make this card.

Ingredients:

  • Stefania Ferri paper pad
  • Joanna Seen Paper Collection volume 3
  • Signature Dies Hydrangea and Wild Rose
  • 8” square white card blank
  • Pink, Green and burgundy cardstock
  • Assorted glue and tape

Technique:

  1. Take some burgundy paper from the papers pad and layer some of the hessian look paper on top. Cut the main topper from the sheet and the small decoupage piece. Also, cut out the border strip featured on that page and the sentiment. (Brilliant that it’s all on one page I think.)
  2. Attach the hessian layered paper to the card blank, then add the decorated border. I do this with double sided tape. Now add the main topper and build the small amount of decoupage with some glue gel. Add the sentiment in the position shown.
  3. Now cut the roses and hydrangeas. Make sure you lift the rose petals to give some movement and likewise with the hydrangeas. If you wanted to you could add pearls in the centre of the roses. All of the die cuts have been fixed onto the card with glue gel.
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Tea for two

TeaCupBirthdayFor the last 100 years at least, “I’ll just pop the kettle on” has been the British way of handling life. If in doubt … have a cup of tea. Things not going right … have a cup of tea. Long and difficult discussion to have with a family member, I’ll just get the kettle on!

The older members of my family were complete tea-aholics drinking many, many cups a day. But now as the younger generation comes through and flourishes, not so many of them are tea drinkers. I’m a bad example as I mainly drink coffee, then switch to peppermint or ginger tea after lunch, but my daughters – not a sign of a hot drink, what did I do wrong? My younger daughter quite likes mint tea made with fresh mint leaves (bet nobody in the office makes her one of those!) but apart from that, neither of them have anything except water. Goodness me, my granny would be amazed!

I always love sending a card with a tea bag hidden inside it as a little extra – just makes the handmade card even more of a little present. Here’s how to make this card:

Ingredients

Technique

  1. Cut some lilac card to slightly smaller size than the card blank and then white smaller again and layer. Attach to main card using thin foam tape or sticky pads.
  2. Die cut the cups and teapot in white and then stick some scraps of lilac card behind the rose design.
  3. Die cut the Clarissa die in white and trim to fit the card, attach with glossy accents glue or a quickie glue pen.
  4. Now cut a plain circle in the Kraft card and layer onto a scalloped circle in lilac card about 3½” diameter. Attach the teapot and cups using glue gel and curve them slightly.
  5. Die cut the wild rose in cream and green – or you could do it all in white and colour with alcohol pens. Attach to the card as shown.
  6. Finish the card with some flat back pearls and the printed out sentiments.
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